Professor speaks about teacher education

first_img One hindrance to progress is the disproportionate focus on ranking individual teachers, rather than making comparisons within teacher education programs themselves, Wilson said. To conclude the lecture, Wilson said teacher education programs must renew their focus on instructing teachers in how to teach their students. Wilson said this theme is the “center” of all discourse regarding education reform, and it constantly raises questions about the relative level of equality in our educational system. Wilson said her biggest question regarding teacher education reform concerns the current status of the issue in terms of its larger historical context, asking whether or not we are at a “historical moment” in the history of education in America. Wilson spoke about three current themes in the dialogue about education reform: equity and equality, efficiency and effectiveness. Regarding equity and equality, Wilson said it is our nation’s duty to provide its children with equal educational opportunities. “This is the promise we made as a nation, as the world’s leading democracy, giving all of our children in our country an equal education,” she said. These improved programs, or “alternate routes,” are already in place in some school systems and include residency programs and other routes for people of color and male teachers to diversify the teaching work force, she said. According to Wilson, efficiency can be measured by a teacher’s “added value,” a new concept in education reform that refers to whether or not a student would be more successful in school based on the efficiency of his or her current teacher. Wilson equated the final theme of effectiveness to the “discourse of accountability.” Critics of the education system frequently point to the ineffectiveness of current teacher preparation methods, but Wilson said those critics should ask better questions and “fight for better programs.” “We haven’t spent enough time studying what it takes to help somebody learn something,” she said. In “Teacher Preparation in an Era of Reform,” Wilson discussed the essentials of teacher education, the current American position on this topic and the ways in which her research could impact teacher reform. In lieu of grading systems, Wilson suggested a new approach to teacher education reform based on the pragmatism of Frederick Taylor, encouraging leadership through practice rather than knowledge alone. With education reform emerging as a hot-button issue among the American public, Suzanne Wilson, university distinguished professor and chair of the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University, outlined her research on developing measures for tracking learning in teacher education programs during a lecture at the Eck Visitor Center on Monday. “[My research] could be a revolution in how we think about teacher education problems,” she said. Wilson added she believes change in the educational reform for teachers is a positive one, but cited universities as being “extremely slow and getting in the way of change” in terms of teacher education reform. “We create standards. We create scoring rubrics. We rank ourselves. Everyone wants to be number one,” she said.last_img read more

University sues federal government

first_imgNotre Dame filed a religious liberty lawsuit today challenging the constitutionality of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) mandate that requires employers to provide contraceptive services in their minimum health insurance packages. The mandate is part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama’s healthcare reform legislation, passed in 2010. The University filed the lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Indiana. Court documents list the defendants as HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Labor Secretary Hilda Solid, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and their respective departments. University President Fr. John Jenkins defended the University’s position in a statement today, saying the University filed the lawsuit “with sober determination” to defend religious freedom. “Let me say very clearly what this lawsuit is not about: it is not about preventing women from having access to contraception, nor even about preventing the government from providing such services,” Jenkins said. “As we assert the right to follow our conscience, we respect their right to follow theirs … This filing is about the freedom of a religious organization to live its mission, and its significance goes well beyond any debate about contraceptives.” Under the original plan announced Jan. 20, religious employers were exempt from providing contraceptives as part of the free preventive services in their minimum insurance package. However, the plan defined “religious employers” narrowly – while places of worship were exempt, religiously affiliated institutions, including universities like Notre Dame, were not. HHS granted these institutions one year to comply with the legislation’s specifications. Obama announced a compromise in February that would shift responsibility for funding contraception from religiously affiliated institutions to insurance companies. The government will be responsible for defining which institutions are included in this compromise, which was unclear regarding self-insured companies. The University is self-insured. The lawsuit states that the federal mandate is irreconcilable with the First Amendment, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and other laws protecting religious freedom. “For if we conceded that the government can decide which religious organizations are sufficiently religious to be awarded the freedom to follow the principles that define their mission, then we have begun to walk down a path that ultimately leads to the undermining of those institutions,” Jenkins said. University Spokesman Dennis Brown said the government has 60 days to respond to the lawsuit. Attempts to contact HHS representatives have not yet been successful. Notre Dame’s lawsuit was one of 12 filed today against the federal government by 43 plaintiffs challenging the constitutionality of the regulation, a University press release stated. “The other lawsuits were filed by dioceses and archdioceses in conjunction with Catholic schools and universities, Catholic health systems and Catholic charitable organizations,” Brown said. The Associated Press reported the Archdioceses of Washington, New York and Michigan were among the plaintiffs, as well as the Catholic University of America. Jenkins said the University would continue its discussions with Sebelius and other government officials to resolve the issue. “We do not seek to impose our religious beliefs on others,” Jenkins said. “We simply ask that the government not impose its values on the University when those values conflict with our religious teachings.”last_img read more

Honor Code appeals process depends on degree of offense

first_imgWith updates on four of the five Irish football players involved with academic dishonesty investigations, the attention now shifts to the Honor Code’s appeal process and requirements for readmission to the University.Irish senior defensive end Ishaq Williams will not play in 2014 and would like to return in 2015, Irish coach Brian Kelly said Tuesday. Senior receiver DaVaris Daniels is “done” at Notre Dame, Daniels said on Twitter on Tuesday, and graduate student linebacker Kendall Moore announced Tuesday evening on Instagram that he will “respectfully leave my alma mater.”Junior cornerback KeiVarae Russell will not play this season and will most likely miss the spring semester before returning in June 2015, the junior said in an Instagram post Friday evening.Vice President for Public Affair and Communication Paul Browne confirmed Friday that the appeal process for the five players would be the same as detailed in the Honor Code.The Honor Code distinguishes between major, minor and flagrant offenses and outlines the notification and appeal process separately for flagrant offenses.According to the Code, students have the right to appeal the Honesty Committee’s decision that a student is responsible for offense and/or the penalty attached to the dean of the college involved. For a major or minor offense, he or she must appeal “no later than seven days from the date notification of the decision and penalty was sent by the Committee,” although the dean could extend this deadline “at his or her sole discretion.”“Grounds for appeal are limited to: evidence discovered after the Honesty Committee Hearing which is relevant to the judgment that a violation has occurred or to the evaluation of its gravity; the presence of a procedural defect in the preliminary investigation or honesty committee hearing; or evidence of personal bias on the part of members of the Honesty Committee that likely influenced the committee’s decision that a violation has occurred or its assignment of a penalty,” the Code states.To appeal the decision or penalty involving a major or minor offense, “the student must provide a detailed written statement of the reasons for the appeal both to the dean of the college or school in which the offense occurred and to the chair of the Honesty Committee.”The dean “should not conduct a new hearing on the original allegation,” but before making a decision, he or she “is required to speak with the chair of the Honesty Committee to understand fully the Committee’s reasons for its original decision and to discuss the dean’s reasons for considering a change in that decision,” the Code statesThe dean deciding the appeal could: overrule the finding of the Honesty Committee that a violation occurred and dismiss the charge in its entirety; remand the case to the original Honesty Committee for a new hearing or follow-up “either because of new evidence or procedural defect;” create a new Honesty Committee to consider the alleged violation if “there is evidence that personal bias may have affected the original Committee’s decision;” agree with the decision but decrease the severity of the penalty; or agree with both the decision and the penalty, affirming the decision.For flagrant offenses, the case proceeds automatically on appeal to the dean, the Code states. The student can appear before the dean to discuss the appeal, and the dean has the same five options when evaluating appeals of flagrant offenses as he/she does for major or minor offenses.If a student has been found responsible for repeated violations, the standard penalty is dismissal from the University, according to the Code.“Dismissal is separation from the University for at least one semester,” the Code states. “Unless otherwise specified, the student is eligible to apply for readmission to Notre Dame, but readmission is not automatic.“Permanent Dismissal is separation from the University with no opportunity to apply for readmission.”To be readmitted, a dismissed student must submit an application and his or her readmission must be approved by the dean of the college involved and the associate provost chairing the University Code of Honor Committee (currently Hugh Page, vice president and associate provost for undergraduate affairs and dean of the First Year of Studies).If the dismissal is permanent, the student has the right to a review “of any aspect of the case for any reason” by the Office of the President, the Code states. Decisions of the President’s Office will be final.In a statement Oct. 6, Browne acknowledged that “it can be difficult for students, regardless of culpability, who are subject to such reviews, especially when public scrutiny becomes so magnified for those who are student-athletes,” and said “we are working to resolve these situations as quickly as possible.”These cases provided “a complex set of circumstances that required thoroughness,” Browne said Friday, and “appropriate parties were working as expeditiously as possible on them.”Tags: DaVaris Daniels, football, Honesty Committee, Honor Code, KeiVarae Russell, Kendall Moore, Notre Dame footballlast_img read more

Mendoza highlights ethical business practices

first_imgMendoza College of Business will host its 19th annual Ethics Week, devoted to examining different facets of ethical business practices, from Feb 8. to 11. The week will include a variety events and several different speakers. Lauren Weldon Mendoza teaching professor Brian Levey said the week is also a continuation of the legacy of John Houck, a Notre Dame management professor who died in 1996. “Our last two deans were very fond of saying ‘Ethics is in our DNA,’ and so much of what we do today goes back to this quote from Fr. O’Hara [the first dean of the College], that the primary function of commerce is to serve mankind,” Levey said. “We think of it in terms of management and marketing and accounting and finance, but all of that ultimately is to serve mankind on some level and create something where there is nothing.”The week is co-sponsored by the Notre Dame Deloitte Center for Ethical Leadership, and the events are free and open to the public. Levey said the events are aimed at the entire Notre Dame community, as well as the South Bend community. John D’Arcy, associate professor at the University of Delaware, will deliver a presentation titled, “Data Breach: Failures and Follow-ups,” at the Giovanini Commons in Mendoza on Monday at 12:30 p.m. D’Arcy is a former assistant professor for Mendoza.“His expertise is IT security and his particular topic is data breach,” Levey said. “He’s going to talk about things like the Target data breach, going back a few years ago – this was probably the biggest and earliest exposure of credit card information.” Larry Katzen, a former partner at the accounting firm Arthur Andersen, will speak about the collapse of the company Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. at the Giovanini Commons.“ … The popular narrative about that company is it started as a firm of technical competence and integrity but somehow lost its way, leading to its demise,” Levey said. “Although the firm collapsed, he’s made it his mission in retirement to tell a competing narrative about the firm and the many people that went down with the ship — in his view — wrongfully. Eighty-five thousand people lost their jobs, and he’s on something of a mission to tell that story.”The keynote speaker for Ethics Week, Susan Ochs, will give her presentation Wednesday at 4:30 p.m. at Giovanini Commons. Ochs is a senior fellow and founder of the Better Banking Project and will speak on improving corporate ethical behavior. “Her focus is on organizational culture and, in particular, financial institutions, banks, investment banks, Wall Street,” Levey said. “One of the things she’s come upon when looking at banks is this notion of complexity. On Wall Street, folks seem to value complexity – the more complex the better. In most other walks of life, we try to keep things simple, and there seems to be some sort of bias toward complexity.”Ethics week closes Thursday night at 7 p.m. with a showing of the movie “Margin Call,” followed by a panel question-and-answer session in the Jordan Auditorium in Mendoza. The 2011 film follows people at an investment bank during the first 24-hour period of a financial crisis. “Each of the characters deals with this very practical, but also ethical, issue of what they should do,” Levey said. The panel following the film will include professional specialist Walter Clements, associate professional specialist Jessica McManus Warnell and senior management consulting major Kevin Frost.“Ethics and asking more of business is a hallmark of the Mendoza College of Business. Students have many opportunities to explore issues of ethics in business in and outside the classroom,” McManus Warnell said in an email. “Ethics Week is a chance for our Notre Dame community to come together and hear from experts in the field on key issues facing business today. These events allow us to hear from and discuss real-world implications of ethics in business — an important part of developing our own capacities to lead and serve.”Levey said Ethics Week is just a part of Mendoza’s dedication to making its students aware of ethical issues that arise in business. “We certainly have a reputation for ethics, and Ethics Week is just a part of that — it’s part of this ongoing and cumulative effort to expose students to ethical issues and raise their awareness, give them tools and hope it does some good in the long run.”Tags: business, Ethics week, mendoza college of businesslast_img read more

New Saint Mary’s club looks to foster economic education

first_imgStudents and professors joined together to create the Economics Club, a new organization aiming to extend economic education beyond the classroom.Junior Mari Garza, founder and president of Economics Club, said both students and faculty have encouraged participation in the club.“Right before this academic year, one of the [economics] professors reached out to me because he saw that there was in interest in [the subject],” she said.Prior to the club’s formation, students were looking for ways to expand their economic education outside the classroom, Garza said.“When I first had my [economics] class, [my professor] was looking for someone to do study sessions and review sessions for exams,” she said. “There were two or three sections of a macro[economics] course, and from that I would host these sessions and have 30 or 40 girls show up.”Garza said the club held numerous review sessions to accommodate the many students looking to expand their knowledge and perform better in their classes.“I [wasn’t] an official tutor,” Garza said. “I [was] just there to help people who were struggling.“As she helped students, Garza said she realized the professor who had encouraged her to host the review sessions had been correct in sensing students’ interest in having regular access to the knowledge of their peers.“We’re providing not necessarily tutoring, but a resource for students,” Garza said.Freshman Julia Wilson said in an email she joined the organization not only because of her professor’s encouragement and an interest in the club’s focus.“My involvement has helped me academically because, by tutoring other students, I am able to better understand the material,” Wilson said.The club’s first event featured a question and answer session and a documentary screening.The Economics Club hopes to expand its membership to students of subjects other than business and economics, Garza said. The club plans to host several events open to all students throughout April, one of which will be a review session for students preparing for the end of the semester. The others, Garza said, will include a movie and game night oriented towards the social element of the club.After noting the growth in attendance from its review sessions, the Economics Club decided to keep the timing of its weekly Monday meetings flexible, Garza said, which allows attendees to ask for help or clarification on concepts discussed in classes.“We’re trying to figure out ways to get more people involved,” Garza said.Alongside being an additional academic resource for students, Wilson said the organization has given participants the opportunity to meet other people with similar interests.“My involvement [in the club] has led me to meet new people,” she said.Tags: business, economics, Economics Club, tutoringlast_img read more

Lessons of the Week: Daniel Radcliffe, Lea Michele & More

first_imgStop everything! Before you jump in the car and speed off to the beach for the weekend, aren’t you forgetting something? You’ve got sunscreen, road trip tunes, an itsy bitsy teenie weenie yellow polka dot bikini (or, um, banana hammock?)…But wait, it’s not officially the weekend until you’ve read the Lessons of the Week! Read below to get a refresher on all of the crazy stuff that happened over the last seven days. You won’t regret it. We promise.God, Daniel Radcliffe Hopes He Gets ItHarry Potter stud Daniel Radcliffe has a steady gig in The Cripple of Inishmaan, but he’s already got his eyes on a new project—Robin in the new Batman movie. “I’d be perfect!” he says. Holy barraccuda, Daniel! We know you’re excited, but you’ll just have to submit your headshot and resume like everyone else.Thank Heaven for…Vanessa Hudgens?After playing a brothel babe in Sucker Punch, going wild at the Cat Scratch Club in Rent and having an underage threesome with James Franco in Spring Breakers, High School Musical alum Vanessa Hudgens will be classing it up as a Parisian champagne guzzler in Gigi this summer. Bottoms up!Tom Felton Wants to Be a B’way WizardSpeaking of Hogwarts (and let’s face it, when aren’t we?), Harry Potter star Tom Felton must be reading Broadway.com, because he’s super excited about joining fellow wizards Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint on Broadway. Hey, Emma: How many more hints do you need? Let’s get moving.Greta Gerwig Has an Expensive HabitThe Village Bike star Greta Gerwig admitted she needs something a little stronger than whiskey to unwind after the show. Namely, a $7 bar of Fine & Raw Chocolate. After a taxing day of interviews and press junkets, we personally prefer to go on a three-hour peanut butter cup bender, but hey, whatever works. (P.S. Peanut butter cups may be sent to 729 7th Ave., New York, NY, 10019.)Want a Free Drink? Sleep Through BulletsBullets Over Broadway headliner Zach Braff spotted a snoozing lady in the front row during his performance, so he kindly sent over a Red Bull at intermission. Sure, Bullets is splashy and loud and exciting, but it’s so cozy and dark in the St. James Theatre…It’s making us very sleepy…Zach, when we wake up, we’d like a caramel frappuccino.James Franco Can’t Keep His Pants OnAfter flashing his followers countless times on Instagram, Of Mice and Men star James Franco showed off his butt in public at this year’s Broadway Bares, thanks to some coaxing from Broadway.com video blogger, Queen Lesli Margherita. You didn’t happen to capture a close-up for Looks Not Books, did you, your majesty?Anna Kendrick Is a Meryl Streep SuperfanYou’d think Oscar nominee and Broadway pro Anna Kendrick would be able to keep it together around celebrities, but apparently she had a full-out fangirling session while hanging out with Meryl Streep on the set of Into the Woods. Anna, now that you’re working from the inside, can you please make sure Mer received our extremely important letter? Thanks.Shia Needs to Sit Alone in His RoomWe’re not exactly sure what Broadway alum Shia LeBeouf is going through, but he wreaked some serious havoc this week when he wandered around Studio 54 feeding people strawberries, smoking, yelling and eventually getting himself arrested at a performance of Cabaret. Hmm, we distinctly thought Alan Cumming told you to leave your troubles outside.Lea Michele Has a New PhilosophyKristin Chenoweth is a lot of things: Hilarious, pint-sized, charming, talented…we could go on. So it only seems natural that Glee star Lea Michele looked up to her as a kid. In fact, at the Hollywood Bowl, she brags that she still knows all the words to “My New Philosophy.” Wait, doesn’t everyone? We’re willing to bet 100 bucks the overly enthused accompanist behind you does.Sorry, Cosette—Marius Is TakenWe are agog, we are aghast, is Marius in love at last? Les Miserables star Andy Mientus got engaged to his beau Michael Arden this week, which means, yes, the handsome revolutionary is now officially off the market. Sorry, everyone. Especially Eponine and Cosette. Ladies, we bet you didn’t see this one coming. If you want to come over and watch bad romantic comedies and eat peanut butter cups, we’re here for you. Star Files View Commentscenter_img Daniel Radcliffelast_img read more

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical Will Be Adapted for the Big Screen

first_img Beautiful: The Carole King Musical Related Shows View Comments Take good care of our baby! Broadway hit Beautiful: The Carole King Musical is heading to a movie theater near you, produced by Tom Hanks’ production company and released by Sony Pictures. The New York Times reports that Douglas McGrath, who wrote the book for the show, will pen the screenplay. Casting has not been announced; Chilina Kennedy recently took over from Tony winner Jessie Mueller as King on the Great White Way.The movie adaptation will also be produced by Paul Blake, the Broadway incarnation’s lead producer, along with Mamma Mia! film producer Gary Goetzman.Featuring songs written by Gerry Goffin, Carole King, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, Beautiful tells the story of King from her early days as a Brooklyn teenager (named Carol Klein) struggling to enter the record business to her years spent as a chart-topping music legend. The production, directed by Marc Bruni, currently also features Scott J. Campbell as Gerry Goffin, Jarrod Spector as Barry Mann, Jessica Keenan Wynn as Cynthia Weil, Paul Anthony Stewart as Don Kirshner and Liz Larsen as Genie Klein. The tuner has also recently opened in London’s West End. Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 27, 2019last_img read more

Hedwig Star Darren Criss on Where His Heart Is

first_img Hedwig and the Angry Inch Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 13, 2015 Darren Criss Darren Criss stopped by TODAY on May 20 to chat about returning to the Great White Way in Hedwig and the Angry Inch. The former Glee star, who won a Broadway.com Audience Choice Award for his portrayal of our favorite internationally ignored song stylist, is already “so sad at the idea of it ever being over.” However we can all take heart, as although Criss will depart the Belasco Theatre on July 19, it sounds like he won’t be away from the Main Stem for too long. “I come from the theater, my heart will always be in the theater, there’s nothing like it,” he told Kathie Lee and Hoda. Check out the interview with the adorable Criss below. View Comments Related Showslast_img read more

Supergirl, Starring Laura Benanti & Jeremy Jordan, Sets Premiere Date

first_imgBreathe, Laura Benanti and Jeremy Jordan fans, we have the premiere date of their new TV show, Supergirl. The Broadway faves’ series will premiere on Monday October 26 at 8.30 PM ET, before moving to a regular Monday 8 PM timeslot on November 2. We are already refusing to make any evening plans apart from with our television sets on fall Mondays.Glee star Melissa Benoist will take on the role of Kara Zor-El, AKA Supergirl, with Benanti playing her mom. Rumor has it that Jordan’s character, Winslow “Winn” Schott, is also supervillain Toyman.Check out an extended trailer of the show below! Laura Benanti View Commentscenter_img Star Fileslast_img read more

Odds & Ends: Alan Cumming is (Still) Sexy & More

first_img View Comments Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Broadway Gets Sexy (Erm, Sexier)Still yearning for the studs of the Great White Way, even after Broadway Bares? Roberto Araujo, a photographer and performer originally from Mexico City, is showing off the sexy side of Broadway in Male Exposure—B Side, a new photo gallery at G Lounge in Chelsea. The models include Tony winner/recent host Alan Cumming as seen above in his Cabaret drag, Aladdin’s Yurel Echazarreta and Alec Vargas of the late 50 Shades! (who we’ve gotten to, uh, know, previously). Araujo’s work will be on display from June 30 through July 7.Scream Queens Sets Premiere DateBrace yourself for some fresh hell. The new Ryan Murphy comedy-horror series Scream Queens will premiere on Fox on September 22. As previously announced, the series will feature Broadway alums Lea Michele in full headgear, Abigail Breslin, Keke Palmer and a shirtless Nick Jonas. It’ll be like Glee, but less singing and more blood-curdling shrieks.James Corden Honored with OBETony winner and Into the Woods star James Corden received an Order of the British Empire (OBE) on June 25 at Buckingham Palace. “It’s overwhelming,” the Late Late Show host said of the honor, reports the International Business Times, “the things that have happened in the past few years. I feel very underserving…but I feel very grateful.” Take a look at the overwhelmed but grateful show off his medal below.last_img read more