Hedwig Star Darren Criss on Where His Heart Is

first_img Hedwig and the Angry Inch Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 13, 2015 Darren Criss Darren Criss stopped by TODAY on May 20 to chat about returning to the Great White Way in Hedwig and the Angry Inch. The former Glee star, who won a Broadway.com Audience Choice Award for his portrayal of our favorite internationally ignored song stylist, is already “so sad at the idea of it ever being over.” However we can all take heart, as although Criss will depart the Belasco Theatre on July 19, it sounds like he won’t be away from the Main Stem for too long. “I come from the theater, my heart will always be in the theater, there’s nothing like it,” he told Kathie Lee and Hoda. Check out the interview with the adorable Criss below. View Comments Related Showslast_img read more

Supergirl, Starring Laura Benanti & Jeremy Jordan, Sets Premiere Date

first_imgBreathe, Laura Benanti and Jeremy Jordan fans, we have the premiere date of their new TV show, Supergirl. The Broadway faves’ series will premiere on Monday October 26 at 8.30 PM ET, before moving to a regular Monday 8 PM timeslot on November 2. We are already refusing to make any evening plans apart from with our television sets on fall Mondays.Glee star Melissa Benoist will take on the role of Kara Zor-El, AKA Supergirl, with Benanti playing her mom. Rumor has it that Jordan’s character, Winslow “Winn” Schott, is also supervillain Toyman.Check out an extended trailer of the show below! Laura Benanti View Commentscenter_img Star Fileslast_img read more

Vermont Senators Sanders, Leahy praise EPA on power plant pollution

first_imgUS Senators Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Bernie Sanders (I-VT) today praised the Environmental Protection Agency for forcing coal- and oil-fired power plants to reduce emissions. Leahy Statement: “I commend the Environmental Protection Agency for doing the right thing, under tremendous special interest pressure, in standing up for the public’s interest.  The Utility Air Toxics Rule to control toxic air pollutants such as mercury is a health and environmental breakthrough for the American people, and especially for Vermonters.  Finally, after 20 years of dodging regulation, coal- and oil-fired electric power plants, the largest contributors of these toxics, will be held accountable for the pollution they emit, just as many other industries are.These controls are particularly important to Vermont, which is why I have long fought to reduce mercury pollution and protect public health.  Though we have no major sources of mercury, we are on the receiving end of much of the rest of the country’s pollution.  So much, in fact, that the mercury data crucial to the development of this rule came from the atmospheric monitoring station at Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research Center, for which I secured funding.  Unfortunately, deep budget cuts will hamper EPA’s data gathering from this location, making it difficult for the EPA to get the full swath of information needed to keep the public safe, and informed.In Vermont, the devastating effect of all this mercury pollution is most evident in our waterways.  While we celebrate greatly improved fishing on Lake Champlain, we also know that large game fish from every water body in Vermont, including Champlain, are so heavily contaminated with out-of-state mercury that Vermonters are warned against eating them. That needs to change, and these new actions will help.Pollution control technology is already widely available, affordable, and in use at many plants nationwide.  We cannot allow outdated technology to endanger lives and stifle the innovation, investment and productivity that new technologies offer.  It is time for those older power plants that have failed to install this life-saving technology to catch up with the 33 percent that already comply with all of EPA’s emission limits, and with the 60 percent that already comply with EPA’s mercury limit. Without these safeguards, the public would continue to shoulder the cost of dirty industries, with their health, their children’s health, and sometimes with their lives. These poisonous emissions lead to more than 17,000 premature deaths every year, and they compromise our children’s brain development.  But with clear and effective Clean Air Act rules, we see tremendous benefits: cleaner air, healthier and more productive citizens, and the creation of thousands of good-paying clean jobs.  Skilled laborers are standing ready to fill the 31,000 short-term construction jobs and 9,000 long-term utility jobs that the Utility Air Toxics Rule will create.  This is about five times more jobs than the controversial Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline would employ.  And unlike the pipeline, these clean air improvements do not gamble with the public’s health and our environment.For the hundreds of thousands of Americans suffering from heart attacks, bronchitis, asthma attacks and even worse, the EPA must act now to implement the Utility Air Toxics Rule.  We have the opportunity to create thousands of jobs that will make this nation safer and cleaner.  I look forward to fewer poisonous power plant emissions drifting over us to settle in Vermont’s backyards.” Sanders Statement: ‘I strongly support the Clean Air Act standards announced today that will slash toxic air pollution, such as mercury and arsenic, from our nation’s power plants,’ said Sanders, a member of the Senate environment committee. ‘We know from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that mercury can cause brain damage and is particularly harmful to infants and young children. We also know that installing the necessary pollution control scrubbers and equipment will create jobs as we update our power plants. This clean air rule is long overdue, and I commend EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson for protecting our families’ health and wellbeing,’ Sanders added. Sanders and other senators sent a letter to the White House on December 16 urging President Obama not to delay implementation of the rule. Power plants that have not installed equipment to reduce emissions are the largest remaining source of uncontrolled toxic air pollution in the United States. The EPA rule would prevent the release of about 90 percent of the mercury in coal and cut emissions of other toxic substances, such as arsenic. Medical experts estimated that the rule would prevent 11,000 premature deaths and 4,700 heart attacks a year, prevent 130,000 cases of childhood asthma symptoms and result in about 6,300 fewer cases of acute bronchitis among children each year. Enforcing the stricter rule, Sanders said, also would create an estimated 46,000 short-term construction jobs and result in 8,000 permanent jobs. 12.21.2011last_img read more

What jazz teaches us about marketing

first_imgJazz is in the moment—If you have ever listened to jazz music, you know you can get wrapped up in the song you’re hearing. When was the last time your members or customers got wrapped up in your marketing? Look for ways to give your targets an experience they will share with others. Just like jazz is in the moment, you need to provide consumers a “wow” experience. continue reading » There are all types of music: classical, hard rock, rap, grunge and country. And then there is jazz—a unique music style born in New Orleans. During the Credit Union National Association’s Marketing Management School (held in New Orleans), Hattie Bryant opened the week with a session on “All That Jazz.”“Jazz actually teaches us quite a bit about marketing,” she noted. “Jazz tells a story; it tells us how to feel. It’s the same with marketing: it tells a story and it’s about feelings.”So what does jazz teach us about marketing? Consider the following:Jazz is a musical conversation—In today’s social media world, marketing is no longer about sending marketing messages. It’s about having conversations. When it comes to marketing, are you just making noise that consumers are tuning out or you really taking time to have conversations? Just like you want to listen to jazz music, you want to listen to your target audiences. 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Johnson City man charged with identity theft

first_imgSmallze was released on an appearance ticket. The Broome County Sheriff’s Office charged 35-year-old Joshua Smallze with identity theft in the 2nd degree and criminal possession of stolen property in he 4th degree. (WBNG) — A Johnson City Man was arrested and charged with two felonies in an investigation into making a fraudulent purchase.center_img The sheriff’s office says Smallze used a credit card that was reported stolen on July 8.last_img

Trump snubs Senate Republicans in Georgia after they sold their souls to him

first_img“I want to reiterate that the procedure that has been outlined by the secretary of state at our request is not part of a political strategy, but the absolute best opportunity to determine exactly what happened in the state,” said Trump campaign counsel Stefan Passantino.That’s what happens when you sell your soul to the devil.  In fact, Trump is doing nothing but sucking energy, attention, and money away from their reelections. He hasn’t agreed to make any trips to the state yet. He’s tweeted only narrowly about the Georgia recount but not its runoffs. Trump’s campaign has also been soliciting donations to supposedly contest the election (but actually settle debts), and he has established a leadership PAC to vacuum up grassroots donations moving forward. Politico reports Republicans have grown “frustrated that the GOP’s preeminent figure is leaving his party in the lurch at a critical moment.” What’s fascinating is that any Republicans at all were under the impression Trump cared about the party. Apparently, some are invested in trying to convince Trump that his self interests actually align with the party’s interests.   – Advertisement – “Several people have told him it’s important Loeffler and Perdue win because they will help keep his legacy intact. We’ve made the point to him that Republicans slowly dismantled parts of Obama’s legacy when we had control of the Senate in 2016 and a Democratic Senate would do the same to Trump,” a Republican close to Trump told Politico.Good luck with that. The only legacy item Trump cares about is trying to overcome his loser status so he can keep masses of people in thrall to him. That and not going to jail are likely the only two things that ever enter his mind. Trump has never given a lick about governing and therefore couldn’t care less about the fates of Loeffler and Perdue. For now, the only people in Trump’s orbit who have given any attention to the Georgia runoffs are Don Jr. and Mike Pence. In fact, on a call with reporters Wednesday, Trump’s campaign explicitly divorced its own recount efforts from the Senate runoffs.  – Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

Medical staff prioritized in West Java’s COVID-19 rapid tests

first_imgRead also: Want to take a rapid test in West Java? Know which category you belong toNucki also listed non-medical staff who would be prioritized in the rapid testing, namely drivers who helped transport COVID-19 patients, security guards who have had close contacts with patients, forensic staff who bathed dead bodies of infected patients as well as administration staff and cleaning service staff in the ring 1 area, the closest epicenter to the isolation rooms.”If we have enough test kits, we will also conduct the tests on staff in ring 2 areas, as they may face the same risks,” he added.The West Java administration plans to conduct COVID-19 rapid tests for people in three categories, identified as categories A, B and C. Category A includes people at the highest risk of COVID-19 transmission, such as people who recently returned from overseas, patients under monitoring and their families, neighbors and friends as well as medical staff handling COVID-19 patients in hospitals.Category B includes people at high risk of COVID-19 transmission based on their professions and daily social interactions, while Category C covers people showing symptoms similar to COVID-19 who have referral letters from a health facility.The provision of drive-thru rapid tests for categories B and C will be discussed with regencies and city administrations as the medical equipment and medical staff need to be prepared in advance.At least three officials in West Java have been infected with the novel coronavirus to date, namely Bogor Mayor Bima Arya, Bandung Deputy Mayor Yana Mulyana and Karawang Regent Cellica Nurachadiana.As of Wednesday, West Java had recorded 73 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 10 fatalities, according to the central government’s data. (trn)Topics : “Hopefully, the rapid tests will detect more cases and/or people with a high risk of getting the disease so we will be able to take precautionary measures in advance,” West Java Health Agency head Berli Hamdani said.The tests for RSHS staff members marked the first phase of rapid testing in the province.RSHS Medical and Nursing Department director Nucki Nursjamsi Hidayat said the staff members tested ranged from doctors and nurses to drivers and security personnel.The first group prioritized are doctors, including internists, anesthesiologists, clinical pathologists and pediatricians as well as students of medical specialist programs. The second priority is given to nurses stationed at special inpatient rooms, isolation emergency rooms and isolation outpatient rooms. The West Java administration began COVID-19 rapid tests on Wednesday, prioritizing at least 300 medical and non-medical staff of Hasan Sadikin Hospital (RSHS) in Bandung who have had close contact with coronavirus-positive patients.Read also: COVID-19: Inadequate medical supplies take toll on lives of Indonesian medical workerslast_img read more

Investors ‘warming’ to alternative ways of viewing portfolios – survey

first_imgInstitutional investors may be warming to approaches beyond traditional asset class-based allocation regimes, with many also turning to factor or objective-based alternative investment models, according to a survey commissioned by State Street Global Advisors.Conducted in the second half of last year, the survey was of senior executives with asset allocation responsibilities at 400 large institutional investors from around the world.It focused on investors’ objectives, their approach to asset allocation and their framework for measuring success.According to State Street, the survey shows investors are “reassessing strategic asset allocation models and turning to objective and factor-based approaches to better achieve investment objectives in a low-return environment”. Respondents’ long-term return expectations were generally elevated across most asset classes, raising the question of whether these were overly ambitious, State Street said.For example, they are looking for a return of 10.9% on the long-term performance of their portfolio, 10.9% in real estate, 8.1% in commodities, 10% in equities and 5.5% in bonds.More than half – and in some cases more than 75% – of respondents said their return expectations were being met (plus or minus 1%) for the overall portfolio and in different asset classes.However, nearly one-quarter of respondents (20%) said their long-term return expectations were not being met, with only 13% saying that, on average, their expectations were being exceeded (State Street pointed out that the survey was conducted before the significant market downturn at the start of this year).For Rick Lacaille, CIO at State Street Global Advisors, the survey shows institutional investors are “beginning to question whether they can achieve objectives through traditional investment models in the current lower-for-longer return environment”.He added: “Not only does this challenge traditional, strategic asset allocation models by forcing greater consideration of risk, but it also confronts investors with a need to focus from a top-down perspective on the drivers of returns in their underlying asset class choices.”Investors, State Street noted, have traditionally viewed their total portfolios through the lens of asset classes, and 41% of respondents said this was the most important asset classification method – simplicity was one of the reasons cited.However, the survey revealed the “significant adoption by many investors of an additional layer of factor-based classification (or by assets’ exposure to different types of risk)”, according to the asset manager.Although 30% indicated their primary method was to classify assets by factors or exposures to types of risk, 65% said they applied this method in addition to others.A further 55% also classified according to assets’ contribution to their portfolios’ overall objectives, such as growth or income.“This may be evidence of a warming to approaches beyond rigid asset allocation regimes,” said State Street.A breakdown by investor type is not provided in the report, although pension funds are described as being most traditional in their approach, with nearly half of respondents saying they focused on asset class-based categorisation.This compares with two-thirds of sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) indicating that factor exposures and contribution to objectives served as the primary method for classifying assets.For those respondents whose overall portfolio was performing below expectations, the most popular change in approach identified was to increase the allocation to alternative investments – SWFs (42%) and pension funds (24%) were more likely to feature this approach as their most preferred, according to State Street.“Other popular tactical changes included the introduction, or increased use, of objective-based investing (selected by 63% of respondents), and an increased use of active managers (selected by 59% of respondents),” said the asset manager.However, the survey also showed investors feel they face significant barriers to adopting new approaches, according to State Street.These include limited or slow peer-group adoption of strategies such as smart beta (60% of respondents), difficulties obtaining board buy-in (46%) and a lack of in-house expertise (46%).last_img read more

IPE Views: Beware the stimulus hype

first_imgIn that respect Philip Hammond, the Chancellor of the Exchequer (finance minister), was right to identify the UK’s weak productivity as a key problem to address. In his official speech he noted that: “We lag the US and Germany by some 30 percentage points. But we also lag France by over 20 and Italy by eight.”He went on to spell out what this means in practice: “It takes a German worker four days to produce what we make in five; which means, in turn, that too many British workers work longer hours for lower pay than their counterparts.”The subsequent news that real wages look likely to be lower in 2021 than they were in 2008 underlined the scale of the problem. If productivity does not increase then wages will continue to stagnate.Hammond’s proposed solution is the creation of a National Productivity Investment Fund that will provide £23bn of additional spending over five years. Its focus will be on transport, digital communications, research and development (R&D), and housing.The most striking thing about this proposal is how small the planned spending is relative to the scale of the problem. The UK’s GDP is about £1.9trn so an extra £4.6bn a year is a tiny amount in contrast.In addition, £7.2bn of the proposed new fund will go to housing. There is nothing wrong with that in principle – on the contrary, the UK’s decaying housing stock could do with much more investment – but it will not raise productivity. Investment in housing is essential to improving living standards, which is welcome, but it does not contribute to making future production more efficient.Increasing productivity cannot be achieved simply by spending more money. Another key requirement is a willingness to stop state support for unproductive or “zombie” companies. In the authorities’ desperation to keep the economy ticking over, for instance by allowing the provision of cheap credit, otherwise defunct firms are often allowed to survive. Such action hinders the economic process of creative destruction that is essential to dynamic growth in any market economy. This problem is apparent in Japan where economic growth has remained weak despite several attempt at fiscal stimulus.From this perspective the two common reactions to the Autumn Statement can be put into context. For a start, the scale of the fiscal boost, at least on the spending side, is tiny relative to the huge task of bolstering productivity.In addition, the discussion of Brexit in this context is a diversion. It is hard to make any meaningful estimate of its likely cost when the form it will take remains so uncertain. Meanwhile, the preoccupation with the subject obscures the fact that Britain’s weak productivity record long predates the Brexit referendum. The problem would exist whether or not the UK was in the European Union.Although the UK’s circumstances are unique, there are broader international lessons to be learnt. The widely anticipated fiscal stimulus from the incoming Trump administration in the US could also be on a smaller scale than much of the discussion suggests. Talking about improving infrastructure is much easier than doing it. Ensuring it bolsters innovation and economic growth is particularly tough.With the global pendulum swinging towards fiscal stimulus it is more important than ever to separate the reality from the hype. The UK seems to have fallen in line with a growing international consensus on the need for fiscal stimulus. Central banks seem to be “running out of ammo”, to use the favoured expression, so higher public spending and tax cuts are gaining political support.Infrastructure spending in particular is coming into favour. Not only does infrastructure across the developed economies need more investment, but such spending could bolster economic activity more widely. Its advocates contend that improving infrastructure makes economies more efficient and so helps generate future growth. Better roads, railways and telecommunications are all welcomed in this respect.The UK’s plans were announced on Wednesday in what is known as the Autumn Statement (one of two annual sets of parliamentary proclamations on the government’s fiscal plans). In broad terms there were two reactions to it. First, it was hailed as a dramatic break from the harsh austerity of the previous government. Second, there was a lot of excitement about its implicit estimate of the likely cost of Brexit to the British economy (£58.7bn (€69bn) judging by additional borrowing costs).But a closer examination shows that, at best, these points are secondary. The plans should be judged in relation to their stated goals.last_img read more