Stock futures rise slightly after Tuesday’s rally as traders await U.S. election results

first_imgElection officials count absentee ballots at a polling place located in the Town of Beloit fire station on November 03, 2020 near Beloit, Wisconsin.Scott Olson | Getty Images – Advertisement – This week’s market moves come as investors hoped a delayed, or contested, U.S. presidential election result would be avoided and a clear winner would emerge Tuesday night.“This most recent uptick in prices seems to be a ‘clarity rally’ as investors look forward to finally having the election uncertainty overhang removed,” Adam Crisafulli, founder of Vital Knowledge, wrote in a note Tuesday.Former Vice President Joe Biden held a 10-point lead nationally over President Donald Trump, according to an NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll released Sunday. Wall Street is also watching some key Senate races, which could lead to Democrats taking control of Congress.- Advertisement – Stock futures rose slightly on Tuesday night following a sharp rally during regular trading while investors awaited the result of the presidential election.Dow Jones Industrial Average traded 131 points higher, or 0.5%. S&P 500 futures gained 0.4% and Nasdaq 100 futures advanced 0.3%.Earlier in the day, the Dow popped more than 500 points, or 2.1%. The S&P 500 gained 1.8% and the Nasdaq Composite advanced 1.9%. Those gains added to Monday’s strong performance.- Advertisement –center_img Investors are betting that a so-called blue wave — a scenario in which Democrats win the White House, obtain a Senate majority and keep control of the House — could facilitate the passing of new fiscal stimulus as the economy continues its recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.“I think that no matter who wins, you have a quick dip and you have to buy,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer said earlier on Tuesday.The S&P 500 lost 0.4%, on average, the day after presidential elections, according to Baird.Chao Ma of the Wells Fargo Investment Institute thinks investors with a longer time horizon should not worry too much about the election’s impact on the broader market.“The history of the economy and the S&P 500 Index suggests that a president’s party affiliation has made little difference when it comes to long-term returns,” said the firm’s global portfolio and investment strategist. “The long-term drivers of the S&P 500 index have been the economy and business earnings, and we expect that to continue to be the case … beyond the 2020 elections.”One year out from a presidential election, the S&P 500 averaged a return of more than 8%, according to the Baird data back to 1960.Subscribe to CNBC PRO for exclusive insights and analysis, and live business day programming from around the world. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Chrishell Stause Responds to Gleb Savchenko, Elena Samodanova Split

first_img“I don’t hate you. I’m just disappointed you turned into everything you said you’d never be,” the quote read.Savchenko and Stause competed together during season 29 of Dancing With the Stars but were eliminated on the Monday, November 2, episode.Listen to Watch With Us to hear more about your favorite shows and for the latest TV news! The Selling Sunset star, whose public split from Justin Hartley was chronicled during season 3 of the Netflix reality show, continued by denying that she and the pro dancer were anything more than friends.CHRISHELL STAUSE GLEB SAVCHENKOChrishell Stause and Gleb Savchenko Eric McCandless/ABC“As you can imagine, the countless hours of training, and dance rehearsals has created a strong supportive friendship, but nothing more,” she added. “I wish nothing but the best for both Gleb and Elena during this unfortunate time.”Samodanova, 36, announced her split from Savchenko via Instagram on Thursday, sharing a statement via Instagram. He confirmed the news in a statement to Us Weekly.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Speaking out. House after Dancing With the Stars pro Gleb Savchenko and his wife, Elena Samodanova, announced their split, Chrishell Stause took to her Instagram Story on Friday, November 6, to react to the news.“I am so saddened about the news of Gleb and Elena’s split,” the realtor, 39, who was partnered with Savchenko, 37, on season 29 of DWTS, wrote on Thursday night. “It is unfortunate that this has caused rumors to swirl about my personal life. Having gone through a public split myself, I would not wish this on anyone.”- Advertisement – “It is with a heavy heart that I tell you my wife and I are parting ways after 14 years of marriage,” the choreographer said in a statement. “We still intend to coparent our wonderful children together who we love so dearly, and we will strive to continue to be the best parents that we can to them. We ask that you respect our family’s need for privacy and healing during this time.”Gleb Savchenko and Elena SamodanovaShutterstockGleb Savchenko and Elena SamodanovaThe So You Think You Can Dance alum, who shares daughters, Olivia, 10, and Zlata, 3, with the reality star, later posted a cryptic quote via her Instagram, causing fans to speculate that their split was a messy one.- Advertisement –last_img read more

ICE tries to deport potential witness in Georgia doctor investigation

first_img“The women, like the girls that are speaking up, they’re getting deported, like they’re getting rid of them,” Adan continued to Vice News. “They’re getting rid of us.” A petition seeking to block her deportation has been launched by advocacy group Mijente. Click here to sign. Adan told Vice News that like others have described, she never gave the doctor consent, nor was she even told what procedure he was performing on her.“He was ‘overly aggressive,’ she said,” according to the report. “When asked whether this could have been a transvaginal ultrasound, Adan said it could, but to this day, she does not know precisely what he did.” She told Vice News that she “was shocked because, like, first of all, he didn’t explain to me what’s the procedure that he was doing to me. And he was rough on me. There was a couple of times where I said, ouch.” Johnson said during a House floor speech last month that he spoke with one detained woman “who felt pressured to agree to a gynecological surgical procedure that she was not convinced was necessary.” But when she refused, “the doctor ordered mental health evaluation. Being referred to mental health for not wanting a surgical procedure that wasn’t explained to her is completely unacceptable. Another woman told us she was subject to invasive procedures without consent and then was not given any follow-up appointments.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Campaign ActionVice News reports that four other witnesses or potential witnesses have also faced threats of deportation or have already been deported for trying to expose abuses that legislators called “a horror show” following an inspection of the facility in September. “Women at Irwin County detention described a disturbing pattern that many who visited a doctor for Gyno/OBGYN issues came back worse,” California Rep. Nanette Barragán tweeted at the time. – Advertisement – Adan said she was vocal in speaking out about what happened to her, writing to legislators and speaking to organizations, when she was told to get ready for what Vice News describes as imminent deportation to Mexico. That was blocked by Johnson’s office, though that may only be a temporary reprieve because “her lawyers still fear it could happen at any time,” the report continued. ICE’s retaliation is in fact common, and it intentionally forces abused immigrants into silence. Last month, officials attempted to deport two Black immigrants who said in a civil rights complaint that agents tortured them in order to coerce them into deportation. The asylum-seekers were pulled off the flight at the very last moment. But others haven’t been.“There has been a policy choice to allow the system that deports people without allowing them to testify or allowing government to investigate what happened to them,” Andrew Free, an immigration attorney helping in investigation efforts, told Vice News. “The consequence is that they essentially complete the obstruction of evidence.” He said people may be perfectly willing to bravely expose abuses, but then fear it will negatively impact their case and lead to separation from their family.- Advertisement –last_img read more

LISTEN: Dan Leo and Mike Umaga on Will Greenwood’s podcast | Rugby Union News

first_img– Advertisement – To listen to all that and much more, click play above for the latest edition of Will Greenwood’s Podcast! Could Rugby Union head the way of Rugby League and place players on report instead of red carding them?Greenwood and Cox also preview the weekend’s Autumn Nations Cup Tests, as Ireland face Wales in Dublin on Friday, before England play Georgia at Twickenham, Scotland travel to face Italy and France play host to Fiji across the weekend.The bulk of our episode this week is a conversation with special guests Dan Leo and Mike Umaga, however, as the pair discuss the plight of the Pacific Nations, their work for ‘Pacific Rugby Welfare’, and their soon to be released film/documentary called ‘Oceans Apart’.- Advertisement – First up on this week’s episode, Cox and Greenwood review Round 2 of the Tri-Nations and the Wallabies’ dramatic 24-22 victory over the All Blacks in Brisbane, as well as looking forward to Round 3 of the competition.Our team also discuss the red cards dished out to New Zealand prop Ofa Tu’ungafasi and Australia flanker Lachlan Swinton – were they harsh? Or were they absolutely right?- Advertisement – ​​​​​​Will Greenwood and Rupert Cox discuss the Tri-Nations and red cards, preview the Autumn Nations Cup, and chat to special guests Dan Leo and Mike Umaga on the plight of the Pacific Nations…- Advertisement –

Coronavirus Briefing: What Happened Today

first_imgWill Thanksgiving lead to a spike in cases? Time magazine found that Canada’s Thanksgiving, on Oct. 12, did. What you’re doingI have eight roommates in my house, off of Ohio State University’s campus. It has been very helpful to have a community while trying to social distance. People are shocked when I tell them I live with so many people, but I would never have it any other way. Some things we do to keep busy: shave our heads, become Ping-Pong masters, fix old go karts and race in empty parking lots, and work toward becoming master carpenters. This year has been a rough one, but having people to do it with made it extremely fun.— Andy Vasulka, Columbus, OhioLet us know how you’re dealing with the pandemic. Send us a response here, and we may feature it in an upcoming newsletter.Sign up here to get the briefing by email. Adam Pasick contributed to today’s briefing. It’s been a tough year for parents. Schools have closed and reopened, only to close again. Parents have scrambled to find child care while struggling to do their jobs and navigate remote learning. But there have been joyous moments, too.The Times spoke to mothers and fathers across the county about what parenting has been like in the pandemic. Here are a few of their stories.Resurgences As cases continue to grow in most of Canada, the western province of Manitoba implemented sweeping restrictions that closed most stores other than grocers and pharmacies, along with sports fields and playgrounds, bars, movie houses and theaters. Here’s where the virus has hit hardestThe United States is reeling as infections and hospitalizations soar to all-time highs. Outbreaks are emerging from coast to coast.Which place is the worst off?- Advertisement – Schools in N.Y.C. may closeThe nation’s largest school system is on the precipice of closing thousands of schools.New York City, once the global epicenter of the pandemic, now has far lower rates of community infection than most of the country, but the numbers are quickly climbing. On Thursday, the seven-day test positivity rate rose to 2.6 percent. If that number hits 3 percent, schools are supposed to close.For many of the approximately 300,000 families who have cobbled together ways to send their kids to classrooms for a few days a week in this fractured school year, the reversal is a gut punch.Particularly maddening is that restaurants, bars and gyms — indoor spaces which have been shown to be primary vectors of coronavirus infection — remain open, albeit with some restrictions.New York City’s schools have recorded a much smaller number of infections. A recent positive-test rate was just 0.17 percent, prompting one of the city’s top health officials to declare that public schools are among the safest public places around.Many countries in Western Europe have chosen to keep classrooms open and to place restrictions on bars and restaurants instead, a contrast that has not gone without notice.“That N.Y.C.’s public schools may have to shut down because the city and state felt they just had to let people dine indoors and work out at a gym says all we need to know about how much our society values public education, particularly when it comes to low-income Black & brown kids,” our colleague Nikole Hannah-Jones said on Twitter.Other major American cities with climbing cases have already delayed returns or walked back reopening plans for public schools. On Thursday, Detroit announced it would stop all in-person learning. This week, cities including Minneapolis and Philadelphia delayed planned returns. In late October, Boston pulled its few in-person students. And almost all public school students in Los Angeles; Chicago; Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco are also learning remotely. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that children’s visits to the emergency room for mental health issues have risen sharply. Here’s a roundup of restrictions in all 50 states.What else we’re following The state with the highest hospitalization rate: South Dakota.- Advertisement – New Zealand, which eliminated community spread of the virus, discovered a mysterious new case that officials think may have been transmitted within the country, Radio New Zealand reports. Dr. Michael Osterholm, a coronavirus adviser to President-elect Joe Biden, said that shutting down the economy and paying people for lost wages for four to six weeks would help get the virus under control and keep the economy afloat until a vaccine is available, CNBC reports. In Italy, which is facing a surge in cases, a video of a man who died in the bathroom of an emergency room in Naples from what might have been Covid has sparked outrage across the country. – Advertisement – About 54 of every 100,000 South Dakotans are hospitalized with Covid-19. The testing positivity rate remains sky-high, and there are few signs of progress. On Tuesday, Mayor Paul TenHaken of Sioux Falls cast the tiebreaking vote to strike down a citywide mask mandate, which he has called “simply unenforceable.”The biggest cluster: Avenal State Prison, Calif.In the U.S., more than 30 correctional facilities have reported more than 1,000 cases each, but none have more than Avenal State Prison, in the San Joaquin Valley. It has logged more than 3,300 known cases among prisoners and correctional officers.The state that has unraveled the fastest: Wisconsin.At the beginning of September, Wisconsin averaged about 700 cases a day. This week, it’s averaging more than 6,000. Hospitals are packed, positivity rates remain high, and testing supplies are strained. More than 300 deaths were reported in the state over the past week, a record.The big city with the worst death toll: New York City.More than 24,000 New Yorkers, or one in every 351 city residents, have died from the virus. Still, some rural counties in other parts of the country may have higher death rates. Last month, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington predicted that by around Inauguration Day, deaths in the U.S. could reach 2,200 a day, and total 386,000. As infections accelerate, Foreign Policy reports that deaths may reach 2,500 a day, and 400,000 total, by around Christmas. A passenger tested positive on a “preliminary basis” on the first cruise ship to begin sailing again in the Caribbean, The Points Guy reports. Dry air caused by cold winter temperatures and heaters can make it easier for viruses to spread, Wired reports. A humidifier this winter could help. The county with the most known cases: Los Angeles County, Calif.More than 325,000 cases have been identified in Los Angeles County over the course of the pandemic, more than in 44 states — but this figure can be a bit misleading. On a per-capita basis, Los Angeles County has far fewer cases than many other counties in California and elsewhere. Our reporters Mitch Smith and Amy Harmon dug into the data and found lots of places that would qualify — depending on the metrics.The metro area with the most recent cases per capita: Minot, N.D.North Dakota has the most total cases per capita and the most recent cases per capita, and the Minot area, known for its Air Force base, is doing worse than anywhere else.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Trump snubs Senate Republicans in Georgia after they sold their souls to him

first_img“I want to reiterate that the procedure that has been outlined by the secretary of state at our request is not part of a political strategy, but the absolute best opportunity to determine exactly what happened in the state,” said Trump campaign counsel Stefan Passantino.That’s what happens when you sell your soul to the devil.  In fact, Trump is doing nothing but sucking energy, attention, and money away from their reelections. He hasn’t agreed to make any trips to the state yet. He’s tweeted only narrowly about the Georgia recount but not its runoffs. Trump’s campaign has also been soliciting donations to supposedly contest the election (but actually settle debts), and he has established a leadership PAC to vacuum up grassroots donations moving forward. Politico reports Republicans have grown “frustrated that the GOP’s preeminent figure is leaving his party in the lurch at a critical moment.” What’s fascinating is that any Republicans at all were under the impression Trump cared about the party. Apparently, some are invested in trying to convince Trump that his self interests actually align with the party’s interests.   – Advertisement – “Several people have told him it’s important Loeffler and Perdue win because they will help keep his legacy intact. We’ve made the point to him that Republicans slowly dismantled parts of Obama’s legacy when we had control of the Senate in 2016 and a Democratic Senate would do the same to Trump,” a Republican close to Trump told Politico.Good luck with that. The only legacy item Trump cares about is trying to overcome his loser status so he can keep masses of people in thrall to him. That and not going to jail are likely the only two things that ever enter his mind. Trump has never given a lick about governing and therefore couldn’t care less about the fates of Loeffler and Perdue. For now, the only people in Trump’s orbit who have given any attention to the Georgia runoffs are Don Jr. and Mike Pence. In fact, on a call with reporters Wednesday, Trump’s campaign explicitly divorced its own recount efforts from the Senate runoffs.  – Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

EPA finds E coli , coliform in airplane water tests

first_img EPA announcement [News release] Flights in Virginia, Georgia, Texa, and California were tested in August and September. Repeat tests on 11 aircraft indicated eight planes still didn’t meet EPA’s water-quality standards. Sep 27, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – More than 12% of passenger aircraft contained Escherichia coli or coliform bacteria in a recent round of testing, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) found. The Air Transport Association (ATA) said that about 90% of member aircraft could be traveling internationally and loading water from sources not subject to EPA standards. Drinking water aboard 158 randomly selected passenger planes was tested. While 87.4% of the planes met EPA drinking-water quality standards, 12.6% did not. Initial testing showed 20 planes had positive results for total coliform bacteria; two of them also tested positive for E coli. Both of those contaminants are indicators that the water could contain other disease-causing organisms. See alsocenter_img EPA had begun a review of rules and guidelines in 2002 but is speeding up the process in light of the aircraft test results, the agency announced. The agency is placing specific emphasis on preventive measures, adequate monitoring, and sound maintenance practices such as flushing and disinfection of aircraft water systems. EPA and ATA are collaborating to reach agreement on how airlines will bring drinking water up to acceptable standards, a news release said, but added that if they cannot agree, EPA will exercise its enforcement authorities. Passengers with compromised immune systems may want to request canned or bottled beverages, EPA suggested in a Sep 20 news release. EPA answers to frequently asked questions about airline water safety [FAQ]last_img read more

SWINE FLU BREAKING NEWS 2: Second US death, speeding vaccine production, quarantined foreigners, House spending proposal

first_imgMay 5, 2009 Mexico sent a plane to China to pick up about 70 Mexicans who were quarantined there, Reuters reported today. The plane made stops in Shanghai and Beijing and was scheduled to go on to Guangzhou and Hong Kong before flying home, the story said. Meanwhile, a Chinese plane picked up 79 Chinese in Mexico City and was expected to pick up 20 more in Tijuana before flying them home, Reuters reported, citing a Xinhua story. US Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said today at a press briefing that drug companies will accelerate production of the seasonal flu vaccine to help provide the capacity to make a vaccine against the novel H1N1 virus. Health officials have said the CDC is developing a seed strain as the first step toward making the vaccine, though a decision to use the vaccine would be considered separately. US House Democrats have unveiled a $94.2 billion emergency supplemental spending bill that includes $2 billion for battling a potential worsening of the flu epidemic, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report. President Barack Obama had asked for $1.5 billion for the flu epidemic. Most of the money in the bill is intended for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. [AFP report] Texas reported the nation’s second death from the novel H1N1 influenza (swine flu), in a woman from Cameron County who had a chronic health condition. According to an update posted on the Texas Department of State Health Services (TDSHS) Web site, she died earlier this week. The first US death from the new flu strain also occurred in Texas, a 22-month-old boy from Mexico City.last_img read more