Rising rooftop solar output pushes demand on Western Australia’s grid to all-time low

first_imgRising rooftop solar output pushes demand on Western Australia’s grid to all-time low FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:The West Australia grid has set a new record low for minimum demand as rooftop solar continues to increase its share of generation, and the government announces it is reshaping solar export tariffs to encourage storage, electric vehicles and west facing solar panels.The new low was set on Sunday, just after noon local time, when grid demand fell to 1059MW as rooftop solar provided 40 per cent of total generation. That’s below the previous record of 1135MW set in January this year, but the Australian Energy Market Operator expects that further lows will be set this spring and in following years.The record fell on the same weekend that new winter lows for minimum demand were set in Victoria and South Australia, according to AEMO, both also the result of increased generation from rooftop solar, and low overall demand.The lows for minimum demand levels are falling rapidly. “This was the fourth consecutive quarter in which a minimum quarterly demand record was set, of which two were all-time minimum demand records, highlighting the continuing impact of distributed PV on demand patterns and quantities in the WEM,” AEMO said in its latest Quarterly Energy Dynamics statement.This new record takes the number of consecutive quarters with a new minimum demand record to five, including three which are all time records.[Giles Parkinson]More: Rooftop solar: W.A. sets new record low for grid demand, two other states set winter lowslast_img read more

U.S. Soldiers Train under Fire Aided by Army’s New Network

first_img To get that critical information from the depths of the woods to the commanders across the brigade, the squad leader simply typed the location and information into his device. His Rifleman Radio sent that signal to his platoon’s vehicle, which was equipped with CS 13 capabilities. Since his unit’s networked radios retransmit signals, he didn’t have to be within range of the vehicle; his radio could just hop through other radios in the area to get the signal back to the vehicle, reaching tactical operations centers and WIN-T Increment 2-equipped vehicles across the brigade. In a matter of minutes, everyone involved in the operations had the complete operational picture. As a U.S. Army platoon in training heads into a quiet mock Afghan village, an improvised explosive device detonates in its path; Soldiers on foot dodge swarms of insurgent gunfire. Because the unit is equipped with new Capability Set 13 network technologies, the location of each Soldier and details of the fight can be sent to commanders throughout the entire brigade, who can quickly send in needed support and put their next move into action. If needed, the WIN-T network could pass that information all the way back to the United States. If they deploy, the BCTs armed with CS 13 capabilities will serve as Security Forces Advisory and Assist Teams (SFAATs), working with Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF), to improve their capability and help the Afghans secure their country as coalition forces reduce their presence. The advantages of CS 13 were apparent when a U.S. Army platoon was required to assist the ANSF role players in questioning a suspected Afghan insurgent in a small village. After searching the suspect’s car, they found explosive materials and a map that led to a replicated weapons cache in the woods outside of the village. The platoon’s new CS 13 capabilities enabled the squad leader at the scene to inform the entire brigade of the event so an Explosive Ordnance Disposal team could be called in to safely dismantle the explosives. The Warfighter Information Network-Tactical system (WIN-T, Increment 2), often referred to as the Army’s Internet, is the mobile tactical communications network backbone that binds the capability sets together, increasing the pace of combat operations and extending the operational distances units can cover. CS 13 is the first of the U.S. Army’s fully-integrated network fielding efforts, which include a mix of capabilities that are scalable and tailorable in design to support the changing requirements of current and future missions. CS 13 includes radios, satellite systems, software applications, smartphone-like devices and other network components that provide connectivity from the stationary command post to the commander on-the-move in a tactical vehicle to the dismounted Soldier. center_img “SFAAT missions involve small teams pushing out to assist their Afghan counterparts, and they might not be going to a U.S. base with tremendous network capability, but now Soldiers can take the network with them — and that is incredible,” said Maj. Graham Wood, brigade communications officer for 3/10. “As we begin to reduce our footprint in Afghanistan, WIN-T Increment 2 [as part of CS 13] gives you that capability to have the network up until the point that you leave theater. There is no gap anymore; you can stay because the network stays with you.” Real-life scenarios unfold daily at the U.S. Army’s Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC), in Fort Polk, Louisiana, complete with simulated IED explosions and gunfire, replicated Afghan villages and more than 250 role players standing in for the Afghan Army, police and civilians. In preparation for a possible deployment, 3/10 recently trained at the JRTC with the Army’s new Capability Set 13 (CS 13), capabilities. “[In the past] information on improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in theater was delayed as it got [disseminated throughout the brigade] in detail,” said Staff Sgt. Christopher Clark, a squad leader with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team (BCT), 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), or 3/10, during recent training exercises. “Now, with everyone seeing the same picture at the same time, a battalion or brigade commander and his higher headquarters can make [immediate] assessments.” By Dialogo July 23, 2013 “Information is populated across the world, not just in the brigade, really it’s global,” Wood said. “Anybody [in the U.S. force] is going to be able to see and communicate with that Soldier once you get that link out of the vehicle.”last_img read more

Colombian National Army provides health care to more than 800 people in La Gloria

first_imgLa Gloria is located in the southwestern portion of Cesar, near the Eastern mountain range and the Magdalena Medio valley. Economic and production development in the municipality of La Gloria is based on farming and fishing. “This type of service allows our soldiers to look after the well-being of the civilian population, especially those who one way or another have been affected by the armed conflict in that area,” said the commander of the Tenth Armored Brigade, Brigadier General Adelmo Fajardo Hernández. “It is our responsibility to guarantee the safety and tranquility of the Colombian people, but we have a commitment to society to find ways to improve the welfare of the least fortunate members of the population.” While military physician treated patients, soldiers with the Special Psychological Operations Group (GEOS) from the Tenth Armored Brigade entertained children from the area. Soldiers dressed as clowns, set up moon bounces for children, and provided snacks and the styling of various Vallenato music groups. While military physician treated patients, soldiers with the Special Psychological Operations Group (GEOS) from the Tenth Armored Brigade entertained children from the area. Soldiers dressed as clowns, set up moon bounces for children, and provided snacks and the styling of various Vallenato music groups. The Colombian National Army is charged with protecting the country’s civilian population, and it recently extended that role into health care provision by providing medical treatment in the municipality of La Gloria, in the Department of Cesar. This wasn’t the first time GEOS troops worked to provide health care to the civilian population. At the end of September, they supported other Colombian government agencies and an NGO to provide medical care to more than 1,000 people in the Department of Putumayo. At that event, GEOS soldiers also entertained area children. And in early October, GEOS troops and soldiers from the Eleventh Brigade sponsored the recreational event “Get to Know Your Army,” which was attended by more than 60 children at the El Amparo Comprehensive Development Center. That facility is run by the Bendecir Foundation in the neighborhood of Santander, located in the city of Montería, Córdoba. These integration events promoted activities that strengthen the social fabric of the communities in Montería. Members of the Bendecir Foundation supported the event to help youth learn about the National Army. By forging ties with children, Army soldiers can help encourage them to reject recruitment efforts by the FARC and the National Liberation Army (ELN). Military physicians – including general practitioners, pediatricians, optometrists, odontologist, and gynecologists – provided their services to more than 800 civilians, including children and the elderly on September 30. They were joined by soldiers from the Third Special Energy and Roadways Battalion, Tenth Armored Brigade, National Army First Division, who provided haircuts and delousing by physicians in the battalion’s reserve units. “Without a doubt, these activities are part of a program to prevent crime and protect families,” said Jaime Libreros, a security analyst at the External University of Colombia. “The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia not only have not stopped illegal recruitment efforts, especially the recruitment of children, but they have increased their recruiting capabilities. The Army’s presence plays a critical role, because it dissuades recruitment and has managed to control some sites that historically have been vital to FARC’s recruitment plans.” The presence of the Army in neighborhoods where the FARC and the ELN operates helps improve public safety in those regions and reduces the chances that these outlaw groups will terrorize civilians. “The ability to intimidate society has a huge effect. So the security forces’ efforts to secure this area are essential.” By Dialogo October 22, 2014 The Colombian National Army is charged with protecting the country’s civilian population, and it recently extended that role into health care provision by providing medical treatment in the municipality of La Gloria, in the Department of Cesar. Military physicians – including general practitioners, pediatricians, optometrists, odontologist, and gynecologists – provided their services to more than 800 civilians, including children and the elderly on September 30. They were joined by soldiers from the Third Special Energy and Roadways Battalion, Tenth Armored Brigade, National Army First Division, who provided haircuts and delousing by physicians in the battalion’s reserve units. GEOS entertains children “This type of service allows our soldiers to look after the well-being of the civilian population, especially those who one way or another have been affected by the armed conflict in that area,” said the commander of the Tenth Armored Brigade, Brigadier General Adelmo Fajardo Hernández. “It is our responsibility to guarantee the safety and tranquility of the Colombian people, but we have a commitment to society to find ways to improve the welfare of the least fortunate members of the population.” This wasn’t the first time GEOS troops worked to provide health care to the civilian population. At the end of September, they supported other Colombian government agencies and an NGO to provide medical care to more than 1,000 people in the Department of Putumayo. At that event, GEOS soldiers also entertained area children. And in early October, GEOS troops and soldiers from the Eleventh Brigade sponsored the recreational event “Get to Know Your Army,” which was attended by more than 60 children at the El Amparo Comprehensive Development Center. That facility is run by the Bendecir Foundation in the neighborhood of Santander, located in the city of Montería, Córdoba. These integration events promoted activities that strengthen the social fabric of the communities in Montería. Members of the Bendecir Foundation supported the event to help youth learn about the National Army. By forging ties with children, Army soldiers can help encourage them to reject recruitment efforts by the FARC and the National Liberation Army (ELN). GEOS entertains children La Gloria is located in the southwestern portion of Cesar, near the Eastern mountain range and the Magdalena Medio valley. Economic and production development in the municipality of La Gloria is based on farming and fishing. “Without a doubt, these activities are part of a program to prevent crime and protect families,” said Jaime Libreros, a security analyst at the External University of Colombia. “The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia not only have not stopped illegal recruitment efforts, especially the recruitment of children, but they have increased their recruiting capabilities. The Army’s presence plays a critical role, because it dissuades recruitment and has managed to control some sites that historically have been vital to FARC’s recruitment plans.” The presence of the Army in neighborhoods where the FARC and the ELN operates helps improve public safety in those regions and reduces the chances that these outlaw groups will terrorize civilians. “The ability to intimidate society has a huge effect. So the security forces’ efforts to secure this area are essential.”last_img read more

Strsslines: The art of personal peace

first_imgStrsslines: The art of personal peace The art of personal peace December 1, 2002 Regular News Dr. Bernard G. Suran Dictionaries define peace as a state of tranquillity or freedom from agitation. When we are thinking wisely, we define peace as a blessing.Although few of us achieve tranquillity as a permanent state, we cherish our moments of peacefulness as a respite from the stress and pressures that haunt us in our individual searches for the tools that will make our lives better. Infrequently do we consider peace itself as one of the significant tools, let alone the object of the search.In truth, some of us prefer a state of agitation as a more rewarding condition: Being stirred up assures a vibrant existence, even if the vibrancy borders on lunacy. To the unfamiliar, tranquillity may be mistaken for boredom; absence of effort; or, worst of all, a threat.Don’t we all know a few type-As who would implode if ever their lives were peaceful enough to conduct a moment of genuine self-examination? They are well aware of the old Chinese proverb: Those who ride the back of the tiger should be very careful on the dismount. At times, all of us avoid peace because we fear what we might find within ourselves if we allow quiet contemplation to have its due.In a culture that places such premium on achievement and accomplishment, peace remains a confusing possibility. A little here and there might nourish the spirit, but caution warns about too much of a good thing.Many people may appreciate a little less jangle in the nervous system — but not enough to risk losing the edge that maintains position in the rat race. If we unconsciously associate the prospect of a more enduring state of composure with loss of mastery, that prospect will never hold sufficient power to motivate a search adequate to the conquest of obstacles.Peace as Mastery Unlike failing memory and back problems, peace will not find us simply because we grow older, slow down, and outlive our indiscretions and immaturities.It’s not something that happens to us against our will or wishes. Oh, the coffin does that: Rigor mortis beats a quicker path to those who spend their lives rushing down the highway of death without thought of peaceful rest stops. The highway of death? Yes, the ambitiously dutiful, driven, down-and-dirty dynamics of professional life that regard personal growth as an unnecessary luxury. That formula invariably disguises a lack of control even in those who look like gifted controllers. What is less masterful than the inability to manage oneself peacefully when need be?Since growing peaceful is much like taming the whirlwind, finding peace when we need it is likely the highest form of self-mastery.When our lives have been dedicated to higher-gear action, our psychic apparatus keeps on whirring even when we try to shut down the engine. Thus, peace requires a new and unique mastery of the psychic machinery that we rev on a daily basis: Sovereignty of all that we have come to be plus command of how we choose to be in different moments of our lives.Such self-possession enables us to exercise the power of discretion. We refrain and contain without stuffing feelings or blocking affect. We recognize blind alleys without having to travel the maze. We use our experience to inform us about situations as they develop. We make decisions based on the merits rather than impulse, unconscious agendas, or conflicting motivations. We also make decisions about taking action or simply remaining above the fray.Peaceful does not mean chicken hearted. The tiger is peaceful. The tiger’s patience before the pounce creates better decisions about when and if to pounce at all. We will not find peace if we do not learn to choose our battles wisely and infrequently.Where Does it Start? In an inherently adversarial profession, lawyers might contend that any hope for personal peace got flushed when they began counting billable hours with a micrometer.In truth, those who are predictably exposed to intense scrutiny and hot-blooded interactions have an even greater need to develop strategies for cooling off and calming down. Peacefulness is not an event, like locating a calm button in our response repertory. Rather, it must be cultivated as a quality of personhood that overlooks the irrelevant and distinguishes worthy action from the simple whirr of the engine.Serious movement toward peace usually arises in consternation, namely allowing the conflicts and contradictions in our lives to surface undisguised, undenied, and unwanted.We begin the journey toward cultivating an inner calm because we’re able to recognize the fruitlessness of various hassles in our lives. Usually, we cannot find the motivation to reconcile conflicts and contradictions until we have been exposed sufficiently to having conducted ourselves badly as an object lesson in how not to do it.The conflicts between ourselves and others are obvious enough: bruises on the knuckles or the noggin, not to mention the havoc we might wreak for others. For what? A start toward peaceful mind begins by identifying the conflicts that don’t seem necessary; in time, that list might grow. Sometimes, the price of peace requires the termination of hopelessly conflictual relationships. The conflicts within ourselves are more difficult to discern, but they all involve behaving in ways we know to be wrong for us.Living with built-in contradictions between values and behavior is the chief enemy of peace; the best antidote for contradiction is living honestly by being faithful to our needs and beliefs. It’s hard to be peaceful if our lives don’t make sense.The actual techniques for cultivating a spirit of peacefulness are many and varied: deep breathing and relaxation exercises, yoga, meditation, walks in the park, visits to a place of worship. The process of peace is self-fulfilling: When we have found a degree of harmony, we become more aware of making decisions or taking actions that disturb that harmony. The path to greater serenity is rooted in the intention to explore the possibility, rather than living with the unrecognized or untested conviction that “It won’t work for me.” Dr. Bernard G. Suran, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist and diplomat and fellow of the Academy of Clinical Psychology and the American Board of Professional Psychology. This column is published under the sponsorship of the Quality of Life and Career Committee. The committee’s Web site is at www.fla-lap.org/qlsm. The Quality of Life and Career Committee, in cooperation with the Florida State University College of Law, also has an interactive listserv titled “The Healthy Lawyer.” Details and subscription information regarding the listserv can be accessed through the committee’s website or by going directly to www.fla-lap.org/qlsm.last_img read more

University’s concerns yield new stoplight

first_imgAfter one year of negotiations between the Los Angeles Department of Transportation, officials from USC’s Undergraduate Student Government and university administration, construction on a traffic light at the intersection of Hoover Street and 28th Street has been completed.Efforts to place a light at the heavily trafficked intersection began in the fall of 2008. Former USG president Jens Midthun and his administration successfully lobbied the city to paint a crosswalk there in the spring of that year, but student safety remained an issue after two accidents occurred despite the improvements, current USG President Holden Slusher said.Slusher said the new stoplight resulted from discussion at a town hall held last year.“Students were very concerned,” Slusher said. “We took it upon ourselves to get flashers [for the crosswalk], but we made it our ultimate goal to get a stoplight.”The Hoover and 28th crossing has seen a total of 10 traffic collisions, six involving bicyclists, from Jan. 1, 2006 to present, but these numbers only reflect those accidents reported to the Department of Public Safety, DPS Capt. David Carlisle said.The number of collisions — likely higher than the number reported — made safety at the intersection a prime concern, Carlisle said.LADOT had initially hesitated to grant the university’s request for a traffic light at the intersection, believing the area lacked enough pedestrian traffic to warrant the expense, said Glen Ogura, principal transportation engineer for LADOT.But after USC invited city officials to conduct a study of the intersection at night, LADOT determined the high volume of students crossing the intersection between the hours of 10 p.m. and 1 a.m. made the traffic light necessary.“It was really a great partnership between the city and ’SC to make this happen and to make it happen quickly,” Ogura said.Rather than wait three or four years — the time Ogura estimated it would have taken — for LADOT to place a traffic light at the intersection, the university submitted designs to the city and paid $190,000, along with $10,000 from USG, for the light’s construction. The necessary permits were approved over the summer, allowing the light to be built last week.“I think it’s awesome that USC fronted that money because even though it took two horrible accidents to get it going, USC was active in getting this done,” Slusher said. “If we partner with administrators, we can get more things done on campus.”Carlisle said he commends USG’s continued collaboration with university officials in the matter of student safety.“People would cross in all sorts of directions, and so many students live in that area [and] would brave the traffic,” Carlisle said. “It was a great help to get USC student government to get involved and get that signal up quickly. We think it’s a much safer intersection than it was before.”Students said they have already experienced positive changes from the traffic light’s construction and hope it will serve as one more step to increase safety in the neighborhood surrounding USC.“It makes a real difference if you’re trying to turn from The Row. It makes a difference for everybody because pedestrians and drivers are trying to do the same thing, so it can get confusing,” said Noelle Blanchard, a junior majoring in political science and creative writing.Richard Heredia-Arriaga, a first-year graduate student studying cinema-television production, said he considers the traffic light an improvement on the existing crosswalk at Hoover and 28th.“It’ll help ensure student safety at school, and school should be a place where you feel safe,” he said. “Crosswalks and pedestrian walks are often ignored by drivers, so I think [the traffic light] is very beneficial and will have a much greater impact than the crosswalk.”While the traffic light may contribute to a potential decrease in accidents at the intersection, students also have to be proactive in ensuring their own safety by following traffic laws, Carlisle said.Even though he hopes the new light will make the Hoover and 28th crossing safer for students, Slusher said last year’s fatal hit-and-run at the intersection of Jefferson Boulevard and Hoover was a sobering reminder to remain cautious despite the presence of a traffic signal.“It’s a matter of comfort for some and confidence for others. Knowing those [drivers] have a red light means a lot,” he said. “But even though there’s a red light, that doesn’t make you completely safe.”last_img read more

Bladow ready for return to starting lineup

first_imgBRYAN FAUST/Herald photoDuring her freshman year, Amy Bladow played in 109 of the Wisconsin women’s volleyball team’s 123 games. The last two years, however, she has only played in 82 of Wisconsin’s 230. Now as a senior, Bladow is ready to get back on the court full time, become a team leader and help the Badgers achieve their goals of winning the Big Ten and making it to the Final Four.”I think as a senior on the team, I’m definitely going to have to step up into a leadership role this year,” Bladow said. “With Aubrey Meierotto and Shelia Shaw leaving last year, those are some big shoes to fill. I think that Katie Lorenzen, Maria Carlini and myself are all three going to have to step up this year and really try to take the leadership role on this team.”However, for Bladow, volleyball wasn’t always a passion of hers.”I tried out because my dad made me in the seventh grade,” she said. “I was a basketball player for the a long time, and he was like, ‘I think you should try it,’ and he made me do it. And I cried for two whole days straight because I didn’t want to do it, but I ended up going, and I made the team.”From there on, Bladow went on to play high school and club volleyball. When it came time to choose a school to attend to play volleyball and get an education, she knew right away Wisconsin was the place she wanted to come.”I went on a lot of visits to a lot of different schools, and everyone kept telling me while I was visiting, ‘When you go somewhere you will know; you will just get that feeling on the inside, like that’s where you are supposed to be,'” she said. “As soon as I took a tour of Wisconsin and met with the coaches and toured the facilities and everything, it just clicked. I was like, ‘This is where I’m supposed to be. This feels like home.'”During her freshman year in Madison, Bladow teamed with former Badger and two-time all-Big Ten player Shelia Shaw in the middle, but before the beginning of her sophomore year, Taylor Reineke came in and beat Bladow out of her spot, forcing her to more of a reserve role and limiting her playing time.”In my sophomore year, Taylor Reineke came in, and [Reineke] is super tall and super athletic, and she’s a great volleyball player,” Bladow said. “She just beat me out for my spot in the middle, and she deserved it. [Reineke’s] an awesome volleyball player. She was just really strong, really consistent and held her own really well even as a freshman; she was a stud. She came in and earned that spot and got to play a head of me, and I was fine.”Even though Reineke beat her out of the starting middle spot, Bladow has used the last two years to become a better player.”I’ve learned a lot from Taylor; just as a volleyball player, she has taught me a ton, especially about blocking in the middle,” she said. “In practice, I’m always asking Taylor what I am doing wrong. ‘Why am I not blocking that ball, I feel like I’m doing something wrong,’ and she helps and she corrects me.”And head coach Pete Waite sees the time spent on the bench the last two years has helped her improve her game.”She has always brought a lot of energy, and that is one thing she always did, even from the bench,” Waite said. “She was really pushing the team on and off the court. What I think she learned from being on the sidelines is how hard she has to work in practice to become more disciplined as a player to raise her level of her game.”Waite also sees a big difference in her game and the way she worked to become better from last year to the spring season.”There were times in her game in the past where she wasn’t working as hard as she could,” Waite said. “I think she wasn’t correcting things and raising the level of her game as fast as she could. She really has had a goal this spring to give it everything she had, and we’ve all seen the results of that.”All of Bladow’s hard work over the past three years has helped her get closer to getting back in the starting lineup.”We are still determining [the starting lineup],” Waite said. “I think she has become much more of a leader because she has worked very hard on all of her skills. She has become much more disciplined in everything she does, and we’re excited about it, and we can tell she is, too.”I think as a senior coming into the season, she has shown the ability to take charge out there, and she is a very powerful athlete, so those are all great things that we want in the lineup.”One thing is for certain, whether Bladow makes it back in the starting lineup, she will be the team’s emotional leader next year just like she has been in years past.”I think my role is kind of like the spark plug,” Bladow said. “I think I just bring a lot of energy and a lot fire to the team. I know that I’m really loud. I love to cheer for everyone, and I think that will be one of my biggest roles on the team, to just keep us pumped up and motivated all the time. Especially in practice sometimes you don’t always want to do every single drill because it is toward the end of the day and it might get monotonous or something.” Just like any senior, Bladow wants to end her volleyball career at Wisconsin by going out on top.”One of my personal goals is to go out with a bang,” Bladow said. “I think it says a lot the last two years we lost to the national champs. We really, really would like to make it to the Final Four this year. I think that is a huge goal for us, and for me personally. As a senior, you always want to go out on top.”We are always looking to finish first in the Big Ten, too. There are such great teams in the Big Ten in Penn State, Minnesota and Michigan. Everybody’s always vying for that first-place spot. I think that just with the talent that we have this year, it is a definite possibility for us. We could actually make it happen. A really great way to go out would be to win the Big Ten and make it to the Final Four.”During the spring season, Bladow has been playing on the right side, besides playing her normal position in the middle. This has helped improve her chances of being in the starting lineup.”The fact that she was able to play both makes her more versatile and more valuable to us,” Waite said.Regardless of where she ends up playing this year, Bladow isn’t really concerned, just as long as she is on the court.”I feel pretty comfortable playing both positions,” Bladow said. “I just want to play. If [Waite] wants me to set, I’ll be like, ‘Yeah, put me in coach.'”last_img read more

Barcelona Sue Neymar €8.5million For Breach Of Contract

first_imgMore to follow shortly…Related Barcelona have announced they are suing world’s most expensive footballer, Neymar Jr, for breach of contract.The Catalan club filed a lawsuit claiming Neymar owe Barcelona €8.5m from last year’s contract renewal bonus.Neymar completed his world record €222m move to Paris Saint-Germain from Barcelona earlier this month, reportedly earning £40.3m in wages per year after tax, with around £515,000-a-week.last_img

ICE Raids Expected in Miami, Other Cities on Sunday

first_imgImmigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids are still expected to take place Sunday in South Florida and several other cities across the country.Immigration reform advocates say that areas around Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York and San Francisco will be targeted in the raids, which are anticipated to last through at least Thursday. President Trump told reporters on Friday, “It starts on Sunday and they’re going to take people out and they’re going to bring them back to their countries. We are focused on criminals as much as we can before we do anything else.”When the raids did not begin as expected before dawn, advocacy groups began redirecting their efforts from helping the detainees to spreading information and awareness about immigrant rights.To that end, they are knocking on doors in immigrant-heavy neighborhoods, canvassing churches and supermarkets, and worked to keep people prepared.About 2,000 people around Miami-Dade County are expected to be detained.last_img read more