Vermont Senators Sanders, Leahy praise EPA on power plant pollution

first_imgUS Senators Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Bernie Sanders (I-VT) today praised the Environmental Protection Agency for forcing coal- and oil-fired power plants to reduce emissions. Leahy Statement: “I commend the Environmental Protection Agency for doing the right thing, under tremendous special interest pressure, in standing up for the public’s interest.  The Utility Air Toxics Rule to control toxic air pollutants such as mercury is a health and environmental breakthrough for the American people, and especially for Vermonters.  Finally, after 20 years of dodging regulation, coal- and oil-fired electric power plants, the largest contributors of these toxics, will be held accountable for the pollution they emit, just as many other industries are.These controls are particularly important to Vermont, which is why I have long fought to reduce mercury pollution and protect public health.  Though we have no major sources of mercury, we are on the receiving end of much of the rest of the country’s pollution.  So much, in fact, that the mercury data crucial to the development of this rule came from the atmospheric monitoring station at Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research Center, for which I secured funding.  Unfortunately, deep budget cuts will hamper EPA’s data gathering from this location, making it difficult for the EPA to get the full swath of information needed to keep the public safe, and informed.In Vermont, the devastating effect of all this mercury pollution is most evident in our waterways.  While we celebrate greatly improved fishing on Lake Champlain, we also know that large game fish from every water body in Vermont, including Champlain, are so heavily contaminated with out-of-state mercury that Vermonters are warned against eating them. That needs to change, and these new actions will help.Pollution control technology is already widely available, affordable, and in use at many plants nationwide.  We cannot allow outdated technology to endanger lives and stifle the innovation, investment and productivity that new technologies offer.  It is time for those older power plants that have failed to install this life-saving technology to catch up with the 33 percent that already comply with all of EPA’s emission limits, and with the 60 percent that already comply with EPA’s mercury limit. Without these safeguards, the public would continue to shoulder the cost of dirty industries, with their health, their children’s health, and sometimes with their lives. These poisonous emissions lead to more than 17,000 premature deaths every year, and they compromise our children’s brain development.  But with clear and effective Clean Air Act rules, we see tremendous benefits: cleaner air, healthier and more productive citizens, and the creation of thousands of good-paying clean jobs.  Skilled laborers are standing ready to fill the 31,000 short-term construction jobs and 9,000 long-term utility jobs that the Utility Air Toxics Rule will create.  This is about five times more jobs than the controversial Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline would employ.  And unlike the pipeline, these clean air improvements do not gamble with the public’s health and our environment.For the hundreds of thousands of Americans suffering from heart attacks, bronchitis, asthma attacks and even worse, the EPA must act now to implement the Utility Air Toxics Rule.  We have the opportunity to create thousands of jobs that will make this nation safer and cleaner.  I look forward to fewer poisonous power plant emissions drifting over us to settle in Vermont’s backyards.” Sanders Statement: ‘I strongly support the Clean Air Act standards announced today that will slash toxic air pollution, such as mercury and arsenic, from our nation’s power plants,’ said Sanders, a member of the Senate environment committee. ‘We know from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that mercury can cause brain damage and is particularly harmful to infants and young children. We also know that installing the necessary pollution control scrubbers and equipment will create jobs as we update our power plants. This clean air rule is long overdue, and I commend EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson for protecting our families’ health and wellbeing,’ Sanders added. Sanders and other senators sent a letter to the White House on December 16 urging President Obama not to delay implementation of the rule. Power plants that have not installed equipment to reduce emissions are the largest remaining source of uncontrolled toxic air pollution in the United States. The EPA rule would prevent the release of about 90 percent of the mercury in coal and cut emissions of other toxic substances, such as arsenic. Medical experts estimated that the rule would prevent 11,000 premature deaths and 4,700 heart attacks a year, prevent 130,000 cases of childhood asthma symptoms and result in about 6,300 fewer cases of acute bronchitis among children each year. Enforcing the stricter rule, Sanders said, also would create an estimated 46,000 short-term construction jobs and result in 8,000 permanent jobs. 12.21.2011last_img read more

Clatter of wickets puts Jaguars in control against Scorpions

first_imgSCORPIONS 1st innings 106JAGUARS 1st innings (o/n 75 for three)C. Hemraj c Green b Miller 47A. Persaud lbw b Leveridge 0L. Johnson c Palmer b Green 13V. Singh c Allen b Leveridge 19S. Chanderpaul lbw b Miller 50A. Bramble c Miller b Green 10R. Reifer lbw b Green 0K. Paul c Blackwood b Miller 1V. Permaul b Jacobs 7G. Motie c Leveridge b Miller 13K. Joseph not out 0Extras (b10, lb11, w1, nb1) 23Total: (all out, 59.5 overs) 183Fall of wickets: 1-4, 2-57, 3-63, 4-102, 5-122, 6-122, 7-123, 8-139, 9-180.Bowling: Green 14-3-39-3, Leveridge 12-1-42-2, Blackwood 2-0-8-0, Miller 14.5-3-30-4, Campbell 7-1-10-0, Jacobs 10-1-33-1.SCORPIONS 2nd inningsJ. Campbell c Paul b Motie 62A. Fudadin not out 61J. Blackwood run-out 9B. King b Motie 0P. Palmer run-out 10F. Allen b Permaul 4A. Thomas not out 9Extras: (b-1, lb-4, nb-7) 12Total: (5 wkts, 50 overs) 167Fall of wickets: 1-112, 2-127, 3-133, 4-149, 5-153.Bowling: Paul 10-1-31-0, Joseph 3-0-27-0, Reifer 6-1-22-0, Johnson 2-0-16-0, Permaul 18-3-45-1, Motie 11-4-21-2.Position: Scorpions lead by 90 runs. KINGSTON, Jamaica (CMC) – Half-centuries from left-handed openers John Campbell and Assad Fudadin led a Jamaica Scorpions fightback but a clatter of wickets late in the day left leaders Guyana Jaguars firmly in control of their eighth round contest in the Regional Four-Day Championship here yesterday.Trailing by 77 runs on first innings, Scorpions ended the second day at Sabina Park on 167 for five – just 90 runs ahead.They made an excellent start to their second innings as Campbell stroked 62 and Fudadin, 61 not out, in a fine first wicket stand of 112.Campbell was his usual aggressive self, stroking nine boundaries in a 68-ball innings while Guyanese Fudadin proved the anchor for Scorpions against his old team, and has so far faced 155 balls and counted six fours.However, once Campbell became the first of left-arm spinner Gudakesh Motie’s two wickets, the innings fell apart with five wickets tumbling for 41 runs.Motie has been the best bowler with two for 21.Earlier, veteran former West Indies batsman Shiv Chanderpaul completed his 142nd first class half-century as Jaguars, resuming from their overnight 75 for three, were dismissed in their first innings for 183.The left-hander Chanderpaul made exactly 50 off 129 balls with three fours but received little support. He extended his overnight fourth-wicket stand with Vishaul Singh (19) to 39 before the last seven wickets tumbled for 81 runs.Left-arm spinner and captain Nikita Miller picked up four for 30 while seamer Derval Green ended with three for 39.last_img read more

Men’s basketball: Wisconsin’s Bo Ryan to retire after 2015-16 season

first_imgAfter 14 seasons of serving as the head coach for the Wisconsin men’s basketball team, Bo Ryan has decided his 15th season will be his last, per a statement released by UW officials Monday afternoon.In his career at Wisconsin, Ryan has posted a record of 357-125, won four Big Ten regular season championships, three Big Ten tournament championships and made it to 14 NCAA tournaments in 14 seasons.He has been most successful in the last two seasons, as he led the program to consecutive Final Four appearances, which included a trip to the national championship game in April for the first time since 1941. Overall, Ryan has advanced to the Sweet 16 seven times and the Elite Eight three times. Statement from #Badgers head coach Bo Ryan pic.twitter.com/pVSeO5eATC— Wisconsin Basketball (@BadgerMBB) June 29, 2015Ryan’s final season at UW won’t be as easy as recent years, with four starters – Frank Kaminsky, Sam Dekker, Josh Gasser and Traevon Jackson – from last year’s national runner-up team who will not be returning. But, two potential all-Big Ten selections, Nigel Hayes and Bronson Koenig, will be back, which was part of the reason Ryan decided to return for one more season, according to ESPN’s Jeff Goodman.One source close to Wisconsin program was surprised that Bo Ryan didn’t announce his retirement immediately instead of coaching this year.— Jeff Goodman (@GoodmanESPN) June 29, 2015 One source close to program told ESPN that he feels like Bo Ryan decided to coach one more season due to loyalty to Nigel & Bronson Koenig.— Jeff Goodman (@GoodmanESPN) June 29, 2015Ryan has been named Big Ten Coach of the Year four times, with the most recent coming this past year when he led the Badgers to a 16-2 conference record.In his college coaching career, Ryan has amassed a 740-228 record dating back to 1984 when he took his first college head coaching job at Division III UW-Platteville. Ryan went on to win four national championships at UW-Platteville before making the jump to Division I to coach UW-Milwaukee from 1999-2001.According to the statement, Ryan’s hope is that associate head coach Greg Gard will fill his shoes following his retirement.Gard is already second-in-command of the program.He has been assistant to Ryan since 1993 when they coached at UW-Platteville and later at UW-Milwaukee, before both joining the Wisconsin coaching staff in 2003. Their career history largely lead to Gard’s promotion to associate head coach before the 2008 season.last_img read more