West Virginia Leaders Call for a Future Past Coal

first_imgWest Virginia Leaders Call for a Future Past Coal FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Taylor Kuykendall for SNL:West Virginia University Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Joyce McConnell says the university has a moral obligation to investigate the potential for an economic future in West Virginia that could include less coal.McConnell spoke April 8 at the fifth annual National Energy Conference, hosted by the West Virginia University College of Law, which examined the downward trends in the state’s beleaguered coal industry and looked to the future of what could be done.McConnell said the writing that West Virginia’s economy needs diversification have been on the wall for a while. “We are witness to a collapse of an economy,” McConnell said.John Deskins, director of WVU’s Bureau of Business and Economic Research, said, “We have some counties that are in a Great Depression,” noting some counties have lost one-third of their jobs.He said pinning hopes on abolishing U.S. EPA rules is an ineffective solution to the problem of southern West Virginia’s coal demand due to a storm of factors including low natural gas prices, anemic international demand and geologic challenges in the region.Charles Patton, president and COO of Appalachian Power Co., a subsidiary of American Electric Power Co. Inc., said he thinks it is essentially a given there will be carbon dioxide regulations of some sort in the future.Showing a slide that projects a rapid expansion into renewables, Patton said five or six years ago he would not believe that was the sort of direction the company would move toward as quickly as it has.“We’ll continue to operate our coal fleet until about 2040,” Patton said. “The output from those plants is going to be significantly less.”Full article ($): WVU: School has moral obligation to aid state in moving beyond coallast_img read more

Louisiana residents, still reeling from Laura, prepare for Delta

first_imgNew Orleans may be spared the worst of the storm, although it will be hit by gusty winds and mild rain, said AccuWeather meteorologist Dan Kottlowski, with Lafayette the largest city on the storm’s eastern and more dangerous side.WalMart said it was closing many of its stores across the Gulf Coast as a precaution.On Thursday morning, Morgan City resident Lisa Mire and three friends took shelter from a light rain to pray for former colleagues facing the COVID-19 pandemic as teachers.The storm added urgency to the group’s regular get-together, she said.”We have today to prepare ourselves and our families for the arrival of Hurricane Delta,” Edwards told residents. “Let’s make it count.”The state sought and received a federal emergency declaration, he said, making additional resources available.Energy companies halted 92 percent, or nearly 1.7 million barrels per day of offshore oil output, and 62% of natural gas production, data showed. The US Coast Guard warned shippers of impending gale force winds from Port Arthur, Texas, to New Orleans.Southwestern Louisiana bore the brunt of Hurricane Laura’s fierce winds and storm surge in August. There are about 8,000 people still living in hotel rooms as a result of the devastation to homes in the southwest of the state from by Laura, Edwards said on Wednesday.When Delta reaches the northern Gulf Coast, it will be the 10th named storm to make a US landfall this year, eclipsing a record that has held since 1916. Residents of Louisiana, still battered from Hurricane Laura, fled inland or hunkered down on Thursday as Hurricane Delta barreled toward the state, growing in size and force as it spins across the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico.The storm, packing winds of up to 115 miles per hour (185 kph), ranked as a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale on Thursday afternoon and National Hurricane Center forecasters expect it to strengthen before making landfall sometime late Friday.”They never had time to recover from Laura and now this next storm is hitting them. They never had time to get back on their feet and they didn’t think they could survive the second one,” Cathy Evans, 63, said of her daughter’s family as she helped them move out of their Lake Charles home. Evans, who traveled to Lake Charles from Texarkana, Arkansas, left with her daughter and family for Texas on Thursday evening as Louisiana was closing its flood control gates.Delta is forecast to make landfall on Friday in hard-hit southwest Louisiana, between the cities of Lake Charles and Lafayette, said Benjamin Schott, chief meteorologist of the National weather Service office in New Orleans.The storm could drive a 4- to 11-foot (1.2-3.3 meters) storm surge up Vermilion Bay on the coast, the NHC said. It could also unleash tornadoes as it moves over land and drop up to 10 inches (25 cm) of rain.”I know people in Louisiana, especially the southwest are very strong and very resilient, but they are going to be tested here,” Governor John Bel Edwards said at a news conference on Thursday afternoon.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Ex-village watchman nabbed in buy-bust

first_imgAn undercover officer initially boughtfrom Bacroya a sachet of suspected shabu. The suspect was detained in the lockupcell of the Cadiz City police station, facing charges for violation of RepublicAct 9165, or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002./PN He was identified as 45-year-oldRomulo Bacroya, a police report showed. BACOLOD City – A formervillagewatchman was arrested in a drug buy-bust operation in Barangay Zone 12, CadizCity, Negros Occidental. Three more sachets of suspectedillegal drugs were seized during Bacroya’s arrest around 3:20 p.m. on Dec. 17. last_img read more