Coronavirus Briefing: What Happened Today

first_imgWill Thanksgiving lead to a spike in cases? Time magazine found that Canada’s Thanksgiving, on Oct. 12, did. What you’re doingI have eight roommates in my house, off of Ohio State University’s campus. It has been very helpful to have a community while trying to social distance. People are shocked when I tell them I live with so many people, but I would never have it any other way. Some things we do to keep busy: shave our heads, become Ping-Pong masters, fix old go karts and race in empty parking lots, and work toward becoming master carpenters. This year has been a rough one, but having people to do it with made it extremely fun.— Andy Vasulka, Columbus, OhioLet us know how you’re dealing with the pandemic. Send us a response here, and we may feature it in an upcoming newsletter.Sign up here to get the briefing by email. Adam Pasick contributed to today’s briefing. It’s been a tough year for parents. Schools have closed and reopened, only to close again. Parents have scrambled to find child care while struggling to do their jobs and navigate remote learning. But there have been joyous moments, too.The Times spoke to mothers and fathers across the county about what parenting has been like in the pandemic. Here are a few of their stories.Resurgences As cases continue to grow in most of Canada, the western province of Manitoba implemented sweeping restrictions that closed most stores other than grocers and pharmacies, along with sports fields and playgrounds, bars, movie houses and theaters. Here’s where the virus has hit hardestThe United States is reeling as infections and hospitalizations soar to all-time highs. Outbreaks are emerging from coast to coast.Which place is the worst off?- Advertisement – Schools in N.Y.C. may closeThe nation’s largest school system is on the precipice of closing thousands of schools.New York City, once the global epicenter of the pandemic, now has far lower rates of community infection than most of the country, but the numbers are quickly climbing. On Thursday, the seven-day test positivity rate rose to 2.6 percent. If that number hits 3 percent, schools are supposed to close.For many of the approximately 300,000 families who have cobbled together ways to send their kids to classrooms for a few days a week in this fractured school year, the reversal is a gut punch.Particularly maddening is that restaurants, bars and gyms — indoor spaces which have been shown to be primary vectors of coronavirus infection — remain open, albeit with some restrictions.New York City’s schools have recorded a much smaller number of infections. A recent positive-test rate was just 0.17 percent, prompting one of the city’s top health officials to declare that public schools are among the safest public places around.Many countries in Western Europe have chosen to keep classrooms open and to place restrictions on bars and restaurants instead, a contrast that has not gone without notice.“That N.Y.C.’s public schools may have to shut down because the city and state felt they just had to let people dine indoors and work out at a gym says all we need to know about how much our society values public education, particularly when it comes to low-income Black & brown kids,” our colleague Nikole Hannah-Jones said on Twitter.Other major American cities with climbing cases have already delayed returns or walked back reopening plans for public schools. On Thursday, Detroit announced it would stop all in-person learning. This week, cities including Minneapolis and Philadelphia delayed planned returns. In late October, Boston pulled its few in-person students. And almost all public school students in Los Angeles; Chicago; Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco are also learning remotely. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that children’s visits to the emergency room for mental health issues have risen sharply. Here’s a roundup of restrictions in all 50 states.What else we’re following The state with the highest hospitalization rate: South Dakota.- Advertisement – New Zealand, which eliminated community spread of the virus, discovered a mysterious new case that officials think may have been transmitted within the country, Radio New Zealand reports. Dr. Michael Osterholm, a coronavirus adviser to President-elect Joe Biden, said that shutting down the economy and paying people for lost wages for four to six weeks would help get the virus under control and keep the economy afloat until a vaccine is available, CNBC reports. In Italy, which is facing a surge in cases, a video of a man who died in the bathroom of an emergency room in Naples from what might have been Covid has sparked outrage across the country. – Advertisement – About 54 of every 100,000 South Dakotans are hospitalized with Covid-19. The testing positivity rate remains sky-high, and there are few signs of progress. On Tuesday, Mayor Paul TenHaken of Sioux Falls cast the tiebreaking vote to strike down a citywide mask mandate, which he has called “simply unenforceable.”The biggest cluster: Avenal State Prison, Calif.In the U.S., more than 30 correctional facilities have reported more than 1,000 cases each, but none have more than Avenal State Prison, in the San Joaquin Valley. It has logged more than 3,300 known cases among prisoners and correctional officers.The state that has unraveled the fastest: Wisconsin.At the beginning of September, Wisconsin averaged about 700 cases a day. This week, it’s averaging more than 6,000. Hospitals are packed, positivity rates remain high, and testing supplies are strained. More than 300 deaths were reported in the state over the past week, a record.The big city with the worst death toll: New York City.More than 24,000 New Yorkers, or one in every 351 city residents, have died from the virus. Still, some rural counties in other parts of the country may have higher death rates. Last month, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington predicted that by around Inauguration Day, deaths in the U.S. could reach 2,200 a day, and total 386,000. As infections accelerate, Foreign Policy reports that deaths may reach 2,500 a day, and 400,000 total, by around Christmas. A passenger tested positive on a “preliminary basis” on the first cruise ship to begin sailing again in the Caribbean, The Points Guy reports. Dry air caused by cold winter temperatures and heaters can make it easier for viruses to spread, Wired reports. A humidifier this winter could help. The county with the most known cases: Los Angeles County, Calif.More than 325,000 cases have been identified in Los Angeles County over the course of the pandemic, more than in 44 states — but this figure can be a bit misleading. On a per-capita basis, Los Angeles County has far fewer cases than many other counties in California and elsewhere. Our reporters Mitch Smith and Amy Harmon dug into the data and found lots of places that would qualify — depending on the metrics.The metro area with the most recent cases per capita: Minot, N.D.North Dakota has the most total cases per capita and the most recent cases per capita, and the Minot area, known for its Air Force base, is doing worse than anywhere else.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Syracuse tries to capitalize on scoring opportunities

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 3, 2013 at 1:02 am Contact Eric: esriter@syr.edu In Friday’s exhibition game against Guelph, Syracuse’s offense seemed to be a bit unorganized. Players threw pucks at the net, with little to no semblance of order. “The girls were just trying to get shots on net,” head coach Paul Flanagan said. “It was kind of a point of emphasis to just get shots on net to get some rebounds and get some ugly ones.” The Orange showed its youth against University of Guelph, and Flanagan said the team will improve with time. SU opens the season on Friday at 7 p.m. at Northeastern and follows it with a 2 p.m. matchup with New Hampshire on Saturday. Flanagan expects that as the season goes along, more and more structured plays will take form.“It is a work in progress,” Flanagan said, “I would like to think some of the veterans will be a little more selective than just throwing it on net. I still understand if you’re a rookie just getting a shot on net until they get that confidence.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAgainst Guelph, Syracuse registered 34 shots but only tallied three goals. This, Flanagan says, may be a result from the lack of power play success. “We spent a lot of time on the power play,” Flanagan said “Just kind of breaking things down. Trying to keep it basic and moving the puck quickly.”Syracuse is coming off of a 20-15-1 record last year, but has six freshman forwards this season. So, the Orange will rely heavily on veterans such as captain Margot Scharfe and winger Nicole Ferarra, Flanagan said.In Friday’s matchup, Syracuse will face Northeastern, a team that went 23-11-2 on the season and made it all the way to the Women’s Hockey East Association title game. The Huskies have also cruised to four straight winning seasons, meaning it will be a tough matchup for sure, Scharfe said.In its last three matchups against Northeastern, Syracuse is winless. The Orange was outscored 14-8 and lost the last two games 5-2. SU’s other opponent, New Hampshire, is a less decorated program, but the Orange will still need to find better chances, something that the team struggled with last week, Flanagan said.Neutral zone play is key to getting out in transition, which is one thing he wants to work on heavily in practice to create breakaways and odd man rushes to the net. These breakaways on offense can help Syracuse get off to a quick start to the season.“I think if we are smart on a breakout, we can find the stretch person,” Ferarra said. “Breakaways will definitely be a possibility.”Although Syracuse has never beaten Northeastern, there is no shortage of confidence brewing in the locker room. “I think they can be a little bit overconfident when it comes to playing us,” Scharfe said, “so I think we can be pretty good underdogs this weekend.” Commentslast_img read more