Pochettino happy at Saints

first_img Next week the former Argentina international will celebrate a year in charge on the south coast – a time in which his profile has transformed from the unknown bad guy that came in for fans’ favourite Nigel Adkins. Pochettino’s improved image saw him mentioned as a potential successor to Andre Villas-Boas at Tottenham and this week a report in Italy suggested he is set to leave for pastures new in June. Such talk flies in the face of the ‘project’ the Saints boss often mentions and was unsurprisingly dismissed out of hand on Thursday. “In Italy there is a new piece of news happening every single minute and most of them are contradictory from one hour to the next,” Pochettino said. “What can I say about it? I think if we paid attention to every single report that came out in Italy we’d probably go mad. I can’t really comment on something that has no solidity to it.” The news will be relief to Saints fans, who 10 years ago today were left reeling from the news that Gordon Strachan was leaving the managerial hotseat at the end of that campaign. Pochettino has no intention of making such an exit and would be keen to extend his contract past the end of the 2014/15 season, although no talks have begun. “I am happy here, of course,” he said. “There haven’t been any talks about an extension of the contract. “There isn’t any news about that and the moment that does happen I will answer that question.” The Saints boss was similarly coy when asked about movement in the January transfer window. Southampton manager Mauricio Pochettino has laughed off speculation that he will walk away from St Mary’s at the end of the season. Pochettino confirmed there had been no bids for the likes of Dani Osvaldo, Rickie Lambert and Luke Shaw, while there are no plans to make additions. “We don’t have any intention to sign any players,” he added. “In theory, no we do not. There is no intention at the moment. “There is still 22 days left in the transfer period and in that time we may change our minds. But at this moment we don’t have any intention to buy any players.” Press Associationlast_img read more

Street proving critics wrong

first_imgPeople told Ben Street he should play juniors one more year. People told him, he would have to wait to get playing time at the Division I level. People told him he wasn’t going to make an impact. No one told him he would score the first goal of the season for the Wisconsin Badgers, or that he would be among the team leaders in goals by this point in the year.Good thing he didn’t listen to those people. Street came to Wisconsin from Salmon Arm, British Columbia. He was recruited by several teams, including Colorado College, North Dakota and two-time defending national champion Denver. But Street chose to come to Wisconsin because he wanted to make an impact right away with a Division I team.”A lot of the schools were looking at me playing another year of juniors and then coming on to play, so [Wisconsin] was a good fit,” said Street of his decision to forego another year of juniors to play for the Badgers.With an immediate chance to bring something to a team, Street did just that in his first game as a Badger. With the Badgers trailing 2-0 in the third period against St. Lawrence, forward Robbie Earl passed the puck to Street in the slot, who beat Saints goalie Kevin Ackley with a quick shot to cut the lead in half. The 10, 000-plus crowd went crazy for the young Canadian, whose first career goal was integral in his team’s eventual comeback.”It was like being in a video game,” Street said of the goal.Since that goal, Street has added two more, propelling him to second on the team in goals scored. With those efforts, he has shown that he belongs not at the junior level, but at the college level. He has succeeded thus far, and he continues to show improvement. Badger head coach Mike Eaves agrees that Street can make it in the WCHA.”He’s adapted pretty well,” said Eaves. “His ability to skate at that pace and think at that pace, he keeps getting better and better at it.”With 190 pounds stacked on his 5’11” frame, Street won’t overpower anyone with his size, but he has shown he has the quickness to move around people. Street has also impressed with his puck handling skills. He doesn’t possess the highlight reel moves that someone like Earl has, but he gets the job done, says coach Eaves.”I think the best way to talk about Ben is he’s effective in the way he plays,” Eaves said. “There’s not a lot of flair or flash, but he does a lot of little things well, and when the puck is on his stick he has a good stick.”He also wants to shoot the puck. Street is fourth on the Badger squad with 17 shots so far this season, and he has the most of any freshman on the team.”He shoots the puck a lot, and he gets a lot of chances out there, which is great,” said fellow freshman forward Jack Skille. “He always wants the puck out there, and that’s one of the best things I’ve seen so far.”Skille and Street are both part of a promising group of rookies that include forward Tom Gorowsky, Minnesota’s 2004 “Mr. Hockey,” as well as a couple of goaltenders in Shane Connelly and Ryan Jefferey. While the goalies may not get a chance for some serious playing time in the near future with junior Brian Elliott in net, the trio of forwards could be making a serious impact by the end of the year.As far as goals go for the young Street, he just wants to make a difference for his teammates, and he wants to help them win in any way possible.”You always want to contribute as well as you can,” said Street. “We’ve chipped in, got a few goals. We’re playing significant roles and on some of the top lines, so it’s been really good to step in and be able to contribute right away.”For now, Street continues to improve on all the things he hasn’t yet perfected, which seems to be only the little things.”He wants to get better every day,” said Eaves. “He comes here with a purpose, and that’s a real treat to be around.”last_img read more

Young the Giant discusses new album, social issues

first_imgStudents gathered at Bovard Auditorium Tuesday to see members from rock band Young the Giant speak about their most recent album, Home of the Strange, as well as their opinions on current immigration issues. Sameer Gadhia, lead vocalist of rock band Young the Giant, said that the group hopes to create more conversation regarding social issues by creating music that touches on these topics. Emily Smith | Daily TrojanThe talk was organized by USC Speakers Committee, USC Service Student Assembly, USC International Student Assembly and USC Political Student Assembly. The event featured lead vocalist Sameer Gadhia, guitarist Jacob Tilley and bass guitarist Payam Doostzadeh of Young the Giant, and was moderated by USC Dean of Religious Life Varun Soni. Soni began the event by discussing current social issues, particularly racism, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia and transphobia, which have been “grappled with very publicly over the last two years.”“From the persecution [of] undocumented immigrants and refugees to the increase in civil rights challenges for LGBTQ … it has been a very challenging time for all of us who aspire to live up to our ideals of diversity, inclusion, equity and justice,” Soni said.As the Dean of Religious Life, Soni said he has witnessed the impact these political issues have had on campus. According to Soni, government decisions have caused DACA students and staff to worry about their futures, and international students have been affected by the travel bans.“We need musicians … who are politically engaged, spiritually astute, socially active,” Soni said. “Musicians who are voices for peace, reconciliation and justice … So we are very fortunate to spend this evening with Young the Giant.” During the event, Young the Giant members discussed their 2016 song “Amerika.” Unlike previous songs, “Amerika” delves into political issues and addresses themes like displacement. Band members discussed this shift in terms of the types of music the group has produced over time.“We’ve been doing this for almost 10 years now, which is crazy,” Gadhia said. “And the first two albums, we were trying to establish ourselves. For this third record, we wanted to show a little more of who we were and pay homage to our parents because we wouldn’t have been here without them.” According to Gadhia, the group noticed the “undercurrent” of anger and division throughout the nation, which continued to grow following the 2016 presidential election. Gadhia said the group became more exposed to these social issues, and by creating music that touches on these topics, they hope to generate more conversation.“I don’t necessarily think we are a political band,” Gadhia said. “I think all art, even if it’s not conscious, can give a political or social snapshot of that time. So this record for us I guess it could be considered as a political record, but in a lot of ways we’re just talking about what we want to talk about.” Doostzadeh said that “Amerika” was inspired by Franz Kafka’s incomplete first novel, regarding the current discussion on immigration. According to Doostzadeh, the novel is about a German child who sneaks into America to pursue the American Dream. “And every time he feels like he’s feeling comfortable, there is this strange feeling where everything also feels like it’s falling beneath him,” Doostzadeh said. “[It’s this] idea of the ‘in between,’ the place that doesn’t exist between where your family came from, where you might have come from, where you are now and the different cultural expectations and ideas of the American Dream.” Tilley ended the conversation with closing remarks about how he ultimately finds the motivation to pursue his passions and his aspirations for the band.“We’re striving to be the band that we can be,” Tilley said. “We want to find passion projects and I think all of us are trying to find what the next 10 years look like in our careers and personal lives. What gives me hope is you guys. Sometimes I struggle to find it from within, but I just see you guys to find motivation.”last_img read more