Harvard Innovation Lab receives green light from Boston Redevelopment Authority

first_imgAfter months of discussion and collaboration, the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) has unanimously approved Harvard’s plans to transform a vacant building in Allston into the Harvard Innovation Lab.The Harvard Innovation Lab is a new and innovative initiative that will foster team-based and entrepreneurial activities and deepen interactions among students, faculty, entrepreneurs, and members of the Allston community.  It will support Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s innovation agenda and activate a building that once housed WGBH-TV’s studios.The Innovation Lab will encourage entrepreneurship and innovation across the University, bringing together many cross-curricular interests, including Harvard College, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard Business School, Harvard Law School, the School for Engineering and Applied Science, and the Harvard Kennedy School.In addition to its educational focus, with classrooms and meeting areas designed to serve both undergraduate and graduate students, the Harvard Innovation Lab will also support the local business community by providing public areas, meeting rooms, and business development resources for businesses, nonprofits, entrepreneurs, and others in the Allston-Brighton neighborhood and the region.  This will be a central place where students and local businesses can work together, share knowledge, and collaborate on ideas.“Innovation is absolutely in the air,” says Cherry A. Murray, dean of the Harvard School of Engineering and the John A. and Elizabeth S. Armstrong Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “How can we leverage all this intellectual energy? I see the Harvard Innovation Lab as having the potential to become an indispensable resource for the entire campus, connecting existing innovation programs at the schools and the College into a Grand Central Station for entrepreneurial thinking. As a hub, the new lab will bring together faculty, students, alumni, local community members, and industry professionals, empowering everyone to dream, create, and change the world for the better.”Organizations including SCORE, the Small Business Administration, the Center for Women & Enterprise, and the Massachusetts Small Business Development Center Network have committed to a generous schedule of one-on-one coaching and business advising, workshops, and training sessions in the Innovation Lab. It will also host lectures, panel discussions, and presentations that will be open to the public, as well as networking events for student teams, local businesses, and nonprofits.“The Innovation Lab is an entirely new model for Harvard. It is an innovation in and of itself. We’re delighted by the unanimous support of the BRA board and the many community members who have expressed their enthusiasm for this project, which will also be part of the University’s efforts to enliven Western Avenue,” said Gabe Handel, managing director of the Dean’s Office at Harvard Business School.“I want to thank Harvard University and the Harvard Business School for all the work they have done in including the community in the development of this project, which will help revitalize Western Avenue,” said Alana Olsen, executive director of Allston Village Main Streets. “I look forward to continuing to work together on this project.”When the Innovation Lab opens next fall, Harvard will provide transportation services between the Lab and the Harvard Square and Longwood campuses to ensure easy access for undergraduate and graduate students. MBTA bus and subway service will also provide access to the facility, and the use of Zipcars and bikes will be encouraged to help contribute to the sustainability of the environment.last_img read more

Tech Prediction for 2014: As BYOD Matures, BYOI Is Waiting in the Wings

first_imgThe analyst firm IDC has cleverly delineated the evolution of computing over the past 40+ years into three eras or platforms – the mainframe platform of the 70’s, the client/server platform of the 90’s, and the Big Data, Cloud, Social, and Mobile platform of today.One of the interesting trends of this third platform and the rapid and extensive proliferation of mobile technology that has been one of its hallmarks is the consumerization of IT. Companies are giving employees greater latitude in accessing corporate resources and data via their own personal devices (Bring Your Own Device or BYOD).In 2014, we will begin to see the next wave of the consumerization of IT with the emergence of the consumerization of ID or identity.  Just as employees pushed for the simplicity of a single mobile device for both their personal and professional needs, they are beginning to push for a simpler, yet controlled, system of identification for authorization of personal and professional device usage.We are witnessing the dawn of Bring (and Control) Your Own Identity (BYOI), which will be marked by two developments:Our digital identities will become consolidated, centralized, and secured on our devices and less entrusted to external parties like Facebook and Google.The security industry’s growing adoption of an Intelligence-Driven Security model will mean identity is less a perimeter-based gateway and more a multi-faceted, continuously authenticating process that is more seamlessly integrated within our workflow.As it turns out, BYOD was only the beginning.  Brace yourself for 2014 and BYOI.You can see more of Art’s predictions for 2014 in his end of year letter.—More Predictions for 2014SDx (Software-Defined Everything) by Amitabh Srivastava, President, Advanced Software DivisionA Battle Cry for Protected Storage by Stephen Manley, Chief Technology Officer, Data Protection & Availability DivisionSoftware-Defined in Two Architectures by Josh Kahn, Senior Vice President, Global Solutions MarketingBringing Hadoop to Your Big Data by Bill Richter, President, EMC IsilonA Whole New World by CJ Desai, President, Emerging Technologies DivisionTargeting the Value Office to Transform IT Business by Rick Devenuti, President, Information Intelligence GroupIT’s Ability to Evolve Quickly by Vic Bhagat, Chief Information OfficerService Orientation, Big Data Lakes, & Security Product Rationalization by Tom Roloff, Senior Vice President, EMC Global Serviceslast_img read more

Asia Today: South Korea adds 559 cases, highest in 10 days

first_imgSEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea has reported 599 new coronavirus cases, the highest in 10 days, as health workers scramble to slow infections at religious facilities, which have been a major source throughout the pandemic. The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency says 112 of the new cases came from the southwestern city of Gwangju, where more than 100 have so far been linked to a missionary training school. An affiliated facility in the central city of Daejeon has been linked to more than 170 infections. The Seoul metropolitan area reported nearly 300 cases. South Korea has repeatedly seen big clusters emerge from religious groups, including more than 5,000 linked to the secretive Shincheonji Church of Jesus that drove a major outbreak last spring.last_img read more

New Saint Mary’s club looks to foster economic education

first_imgStudents and professors joined together to create the Economics Club, a new organization aiming to extend economic education beyond the classroom.Junior Mari Garza, founder and president of Economics Club, said both students and faculty have encouraged participation in the club.“Right before this academic year, one of the [economics] professors reached out to me because he saw that there was in interest in [the subject],” she said.Prior to the club’s formation, students were looking for ways to expand their economic education outside the classroom, Garza said.“When I first had my [economics] class, [my professor] was looking for someone to do study sessions and review sessions for exams,” she said. “There were two or three sections of a macro[economics] course, and from that I would host these sessions and have 30 or 40 girls show up.”Garza said the club held numerous review sessions to accommodate the many students looking to expand their knowledge and perform better in their classes.“I [wasn’t] an official tutor,” Garza said. “I [was] just there to help people who were struggling.“As she helped students, Garza said she realized the professor who had encouraged her to host the review sessions had been correct in sensing students’ interest in having regular access to the knowledge of their peers.“We’re providing not necessarily tutoring, but a resource for students,” Garza said.Freshman Julia Wilson said in an email she joined the organization not only because of her professor’s encouragement and an interest in the club’s focus.“My involvement has helped me academically because, by tutoring other students, I am able to better understand the material,” Wilson said.The club’s first event featured a question and answer session and a documentary screening.The Economics Club hopes to expand its membership to students of subjects other than business and economics, Garza said. The club plans to host several events open to all students throughout April, one of which will be a review session for students preparing for the end of the semester. The others, Garza said, will include a movie and game night oriented towards the social element of the club.After noting the growth in attendance from its review sessions, the Economics Club decided to keep the timing of its weekly Monday meetings flexible, Garza said, which allows attendees to ask for help or clarification on concepts discussed in classes.“We’re trying to figure out ways to get more people involved,” Garza said.Alongside being an additional academic resource for students, Wilson said the organization has given participants the opportunity to meet other people with similar interests.“My involvement [in the club] has led me to meet new people,” she said.Tags: business, economics, Economics Club, tutoringlast_img read more

Plant wisely

first_imgBy Faith PeppersUniversity of Georgia Georgia’s last frost date has passed. And just in time for spring garden planting, rain has returned to Georgia. But those water-conservation habits learned during the drought can still be a sustainable way to keep landscapes healthy.“Just because we’ve seen a lot of rain in the past few weeks doesn’t mean it’s time to forget about water conservation in the landscape,” said Todd Hurt, a program coordinator with the University of Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture in Griffin, Ga. “But, Georgians can get busy planting in their gardens.”Drought conditions over the past three years have had many Georgia gardeners holding off on planting annuals and new shrubs. But with some smart planning, it’s OK to plant what you want, he said.“Simply concentrate high-water-use plants such as annual color plants or highly maintained turf in locations where we can supplement rainfall when necessary,” he said. Hurt recommends developing a strategy to water plants with only one or two moves of a hose-end sprinkler. “The water illogic areas in your landscape will become obvious if you think of it this way,” he said. “The narrow strip of turf next to the street or long line of annuals next to the established shrub bed would be the last to get water.”He suggests planting annual color plants in small beds or containers close together. This will give your landscape the color and texture you want, but still conserve water. Other ways to conserve include mulching and using drip or soaker hoses when possible. A professional audit of your irrigation system can help find and correct problems, too.“There are tons of new technologies on the market,” he said. “There are new lawn rotator heads that use fingerlets of water versus one concentrated stream which allows for a more even wetting of the soil. There are even sprinkler heads that shut off when damaged. That’s right. We can prevent the irrigation geysers we have all seen at the mall parking lot.” Georgia’s population continues to grow, creating greater demand on its limited water supply. Though the rain has returned, the Georgia Environmental Protection Division will monitor certain indicators that must return to normal for around four consecutive months before it will change statewide water restrictions. However, HB 1281, passed last year, says local water providers can request a modified drought level based on their water supplies. “I heard from a couple of sources that Athens/Clarke County and others in that watershed have asked or will be asking to go to level 4b, which is two days a week water use by May,” he said. “Another 57 or so water providers in the drought level 4 area are already approved for outdoor water use two or three days a week.” No matter what drought level your county is in, he said, 25 minutes a day of hand watering is allowed on the odd-even system. If that time is used wisely, most plants will not only survive, but will do well.“Water conservation efforts should continue, even though we are getting rain,” he said. “It’s the responsible thing to do.”To find out what drought level you are facing, go online to: http://www.gawp.org/GAOutdoorWaterRestrictions.pdf (Faith Peppers is a news editor for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Bomb blast wounds 12 outside Colombia spy agency

first_imgBy Dialogo September 10, 2010 Twelve people were wounded Wednesday when a bomb exploded outside the Colombia intelligence agency’s offices in the southern city of Pasto, near the Ecuadoran border, the Red Cross said. A “low-intensity package bomb was left outside the Administrative Department of Security (DAS) building, next to a lamppost, by a man who then ran away,” Pasto Red Cross official Henry Palacios told AFP. He said 12 passersby and workers from the DAS building were wounded in the blast and taken to area hospitals. Narino department Governor Antonio Navarro told Caracol radio that two of the wounded were in serious condition and that the damage wrought by the bomb was considerable. He said authorities suspect the bombing is the work of the leftist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the country’s oldest and strongest rebel group. Pasto is the capital of Narino department, one of FARC’s strongholds in southern Colombia.last_img read more

Senators recognize CUs’ importance, tout reg relief efforts

first_img continue reading » 18SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The Senate is working toward bipartisan regulatory relief for credit unions, a few senators told hundreds of industry representatives at NAFCU’s Congressional Caucus on Tuesday.Credit union representatives heard directly from Senate Appropriations Subcommittee Chairman Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., and Senate Banking Committee members Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and Mike Rounds, R-S.D.Speaking on issues ranging from the regulatory burden caused by the Dodd-Frank Act to the need to hold retailers accountable for data security breaches that occur on their end, senators reaffirmed for Caucus attendees the importance of credit unions in the financial services industry.last_img read more

Coronavirus Briefing: What Happened Today

first_imgWill Thanksgiving lead to a spike in cases? Time magazine found that Canada’s Thanksgiving, on Oct. 12, did. What you’re doingI have eight roommates in my house, off of Ohio State University’s campus. It has been very helpful to have a community while trying to social distance. People are shocked when I tell them I live with so many people, but I would never have it any other way. Some things we do to keep busy: shave our heads, become Ping-Pong masters, fix old go karts and race in empty parking lots, and work toward becoming master carpenters. This year has been a rough one, but having people to do it with made it extremely fun.— Andy Vasulka, Columbus, OhioLet us know how you’re dealing with the pandemic. Send us a response here, and we may feature it in an upcoming newsletter.Sign up here to get the briefing by email. Adam Pasick contributed to today’s briefing. It’s been a tough year for parents. Schools have closed and reopened, only to close again. Parents have scrambled to find child care while struggling to do their jobs and navigate remote learning. But there have been joyous moments, too.The Times spoke to mothers and fathers across the county about what parenting has been like in the pandemic. Here are a few of their stories.Resurgences As cases continue to grow in most of Canada, the western province of Manitoba implemented sweeping restrictions that closed most stores other than grocers and pharmacies, along with sports fields and playgrounds, bars, movie houses and theaters. Here’s where the virus has hit hardestThe United States is reeling as infections and hospitalizations soar to all-time highs. Outbreaks are emerging from coast to coast.Which place is the worst off?- Advertisement – Schools in N.Y.C. may closeThe nation’s largest school system is on the precipice of closing thousands of schools.New York City, once the global epicenter of the pandemic, now has far lower rates of community infection than most of the country, but the numbers are quickly climbing. On Thursday, the seven-day test positivity rate rose to 2.6 percent. If that number hits 3 percent, schools are supposed to close.For many of the approximately 300,000 families who have cobbled together ways to send their kids to classrooms for a few days a week in this fractured school year, the reversal is a gut punch.Particularly maddening is that restaurants, bars and gyms — indoor spaces which have been shown to be primary vectors of coronavirus infection — remain open, albeit with some restrictions.New York City’s schools have recorded a much smaller number of infections. A recent positive-test rate was just 0.17 percent, prompting one of the city’s top health officials to declare that public schools are among the safest public places around.Many countries in Western Europe have chosen to keep classrooms open and to place restrictions on bars and restaurants instead, a contrast that has not gone without notice.“That N.Y.C.’s public schools may have to shut down because the city and state felt they just had to let people dine indoors and work out at a gym says all we need to know about how much our society values public education, particularly when it comes to low-income Black & brown kids,” our colleague Nikole Hannah-Jones said on Twitter.Other major American cities with climbing cases have already delayed returns or walked back reopening plans for public schools. On Thursday, Detroit announced it would stop all in-person learning. This week, cities including Minneapolis and Philadelphia delayed planned returns. In late October, Boston pulled its few in-person students. And almost all public school students in Los Angeles; Chicago; Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco are also learning remotely. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that children’s visits to the emergency room for mental health issues have risen sharply. Here’s a roundup of restrictions in all 50 states.What else we’re following The state with the highest hospitalization rate: South Dakota.- Advertisement – New Zealand, which eliminated community spread of the virus, discovered a mysterious new case that officials think may have been transmitted within the country, Radio New Zealand reports. Dr. Michael Osterholm, a coronavirus adviser to President-elect Joe Biden, said that shutting down the economy and paying people for lost wages for four to six weeks would help get the virus under control and keep the economy afloat until a vaccine is available, CNBC reports. In Italy, which is facing a surge in cases, a video of a man who died in the bathroom of an emergency room in Naples from what might have been Covid has sparked outrage across the country. – Advertisement – About 54 of every 100,000 South Dakotans are hospitalized with Covid-19. The testing positivity rate remains sky-high, and there are few signs of progress. On Tuesday, Mayor Paul TenHaken of Sioux Falls cast the tiebreaking vote to strike down a citywide mask mandate, which he has called “simply unenforceable.”The biggest cluster: Avenal State Prison, Calif.In the U.S., more than 30 correctional facilities have reported more than 1,000 cases each, but none have more than Avenal State Prison, in the San Joaquin Valley. It has logged more than 3,300 known cases among prisoners and correctional officers.The state that has unraveled the fastest: Wisconsin.At the beginning of September, Wisconsin averaged about 700 cases a day. This week, it’s averaging more than 6,000. Hospitals are packed, positivity rates remain high, and testing supplies are strained. More than 300 deaths were reported in the state over the past week, a record.The big city with the worst death toll: New York City.More than 24,000 New Yorkers, or one in every 351 city residents, have died from the virus. Still, some rural counties in other parts of the country may have higher death rates. Last month, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington predicted that by around Inauguration Day, deaths in the U.S. could reach 2,200 a day, and total 386,000. As infections accelerate, Foreign Policy reports that deaths may reach 2,500 a day, and 400,000 total, by around Christmas. A passenger tested positive on a “preliminary basis” on the first cruise ship to begin sailing again in the Caribbean, The Points Guy reports. Dry air caused by cold winter temperatures and heaters can make it easier for viruses to spread, Wired reports. A humidifier this winter could help. The county with the most known cases: Los Angeles County, Calif.More than 325,000 cases have been identified in Los Angeles County over the course of the pandemic, more than in 44 states — but this figure can be a bit misleading. On a per-capita basis, Los Angeles County has far fewer cases than many other counties in California and elsewhere. Our reporters Mitch Smith and Amy Harmon dug into the data and found lots of places that would qualify — depending on the metrics.The metro area with the most recent cases per capita: Minot, N.D.North Dakota has the most total cases per capita and the most recent cases per capita, and the Minot area, known for its Air Force base, is doing worse than anywhere else.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Spanking Children Might Not Be That Harmful, Stetson Professor Finds

first_imgFlorida Daily 13 December 2018Family First Comment: We already knew that, but his comments are interesting…“A new study that says spanking is not as bad as previously reported may not be all that well received by his peers. Ferguson admits that there is a liberal bias amongst his peers in the clinical psychology field, saying there has been a moral push in academia for the elimination of spanking. He pointed out that while he is no advocate for spanking children, the numbers were just too narrow for academia to go as far in its conclusions as had been done in the past.”New research out of Stetson University suggests spanking children is not as bad for them as other research projects in the past have shown.Dr. Chris Ferguson, a clinical psychologist at Stetson, has looked a multiple studies on spanking, especially ones that claimed that the spanking of children is predictive of them becoming violent in the future. He said the research is simply lacking.“If you control for other variables like whether the kids had pre-existing behavior problems, or whether their family environments had problems of neglect or abuse, when you control these other things is there any predictive value left over for spanking? The simple answer is no,” he said.Ferguson conducted his own study as well and found, for the most part, spanking children is not a big deal in determining whether or not they will be violent or damaged from it in the future.“There is really no effect that parents need to be worried about for the most part,” Ferguson insisted.Ferguson researched multiple studies done on the effects of spanking children and found several problems with them. The biggest problem was a lack of control for factors other than spanking that would be even more predictive of a violent future than whether or not a child was spanked. This included whether or not the child had behavior problems long before the first spanking and if parents abused the child, going beyond just spanks. Research indicates spanking is more effective for younger children than older children.“Part of it is genetics of course,” Ferguson said. “What we tend to find is the evidence suggests that there is usually a culmination of a pre-existing genetics risk coupled with a harsh environment. We are really talking about neglect, emotional harshness, kids who are told they are not loved by their parents.”READ MORE: https://www.floridadaily.com/spanking-children-might-not-be-that-harmful-stetson-professor-finds/last_img read more

Deer-Vehicle Accidents More Likely In The Fall

first_imgA deer in the headlights is one hazard of driving through Southeastern Indiana.October and November have historically been the worst months for deer-vehicle collisions and the amount of accidents have been on the rise in recent years.In fact, animal-vehicle collisions have gone up dramatically by almost 69 percent since the 1990’s.The rise in deer-vehicle accidents in the fall can be directly linked to multiple factors including the mating season of deer, farmers in the field and more cars on the road, according to District 9 Conservation Officer Bill Beville.“All of those factors are probably the reason why accidents have risen over recent years,” Officer Beville said.“Annually we do see an increase in car-deer collisions in the fall, mainly because of the harvest and mating season.”Hunting season and improved technology that allows farming operations to continue around the clock are also contributing factors.Deer are most active during dawn and dusk. According to Beville, “Drivers should be especially cautious during the two hours window before and after sunrise and sunset.”It is important to always scan the roadway, use high beams, and if a collision is imminent, stay calm and don’t swerve.“Drivers need to be alert and watch for animals entering the roadway. Just by keeping your eyes up and not being distracted by other things, you can greatly decrease the possibility of a deer-car collision.”last_img read more