Contrasts between past and present

first_imgCambridge is half a world away from Iraq and Afghanistan for most Americans, but not for U.S. veterans of those long-running wars. As many as 150 veterans are now students at Harvard, where they have adjusted from combat zones to tidy classrooms, as they study business, government, and law. In a series of interviews, two dozen vets discussed the startling contrasts between past and present. A few shared perspectives from overseas.Oasis GarciaOasis Garcia, M.P.A./M.B.A. (HKS/Wharton) ’12 Captain, U.S. Army, IraqOut of high school, his first service was with the U.S. Marine Corps Band as a trumpet player. Later, as an Army officer, he was an embedded adviser to the Iraqi army and border patrol.“The military opens doors so long as you accept the responsibilities that lie on the other side.”Hagan Scotten, J.D. ’10Captain, U.S. Army, IraqAfter the rigors of training in Korea (“there are no distractions in Korea”), the Long Island native spent time as a platoon leader — “the plum job, in charge of 40 guys with rifles” — and then post-9/11 on the periphery of Afghanistan, where “I wanted to do more.” He spent three tours in Iraq as a Special Forces officer, conducting raids, collecting and analyzing intelligence, advising Iraqi counterterrorism forces, and managing logistics and convoys. The experience gave him pragmatism, a sense that intelligence is diverse, and insight into national security law. “Experience,” he said, “has some virtue.” After graduation, he will clerk for a year in the D.C. Circuit Court and then with Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts.Of combat veterans at Harvard, said Scotten: “We’re happy to be here.”Joe QuinnJoe Quinn, M.P.P. ’10Captain, U.S. Army, IraqA senior at West Point when his brother James Quinn was killed in the 9/11 attacks on Manhattan. Helped start the Sons of Iraq program, an expansion of the “Sunni Awakening” that reduced violence throughout Iraq.“It’s that experience you really can’t duplicate.”Jason Saunders, M.P.A.-ID/M.B.A. ’12Captain, U.S. Army, Afghanistan and IraqAbout a year and a half after graduating from West Point in 2003, he was a rifle platoon leader in Afghanistan. Redeployed to Iraq in July 2006, he was a logistics officer stationed near the Syrian border.Of youth and warfare, said Saunders: “Going to Afghanistan was my first real job.”Pete HegsethPete Hegseth, M.P.P. ’11Captain, U.S. Army, IraqHe is still in the military with a National Guard unit in Massachusetts and is chairman of VetsforFreedom.org and a frequent television commentator. Served with the 101st Airborne in Iraq and did liaison work with local governments.“Vets come into the classroom with their eyes wide open. Vets also say: I’ve seen the best and the worst.”Jared Esselman, M.P.P. ’11Staff Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, Iraq and AfghanistanAfter high school in Mooresville, N.C., and one desultory year in college, he worked as a ranch hand in Montana and Wyoming before taking a factory job. After the 9/11 attacks, he joined the Air Force, trained as a loadmaster on a C-17, and by February 2003 was flying missions into Afghanistan. While deployed to Iraq, he flew 300 combat sorties before returning to college and, in the summer of 2008, serving as a White House intern.“They say it’s not the years, it’s the mileage,” said the 29-year-old, who plans to return home and run for mayor. “I’ve done things in my lifetime that most people will never do. I’ve stood on almost every continent. I’ve swum in almost every ocean. I’ve seen things that people will never see or ever want to see.”David TierDavid Tier, M.P.A. ’10Major, U.S. Army, IraqStill on active duty. His first duty station was as a tank platoon commander in Korea, where he spent two and a half years. During the second of his three Iraq tours he was a cavalry troop commander and led tactical raids.Of vets in the classroom: “It’s a great thing for Harvard. One, you have perspective from a proven patriot. It’s very difficult to question someone’s motives or patriotism, having risked a certain level. It’s great for the vets too.”Seth Moulton ’01, M.P.A./M.B.A. ’11Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, IraqDeciding to join the Marines long before the 9/11 attacks, he gave the English Oration at his 2001 Harvard Commencement on the need for national service, and went on to serve four tours in Iraq. He was a rifle platoon commander at the beginning of the war, helped to establish free-speech media outlets in Iraq (including a twice-weekly television show with his translator called “Moulton and Mohammed”), served in a Marine unit that saw intense combat with Shiite insurgents in Najaf, and twice served on Team Phoenix, a small-scale group organized by Gen. David Petraeus to study and counter renegade militias.“One thing I certainly try to do in class is bring a little dose of reality to the discussion about what these wars mean in terms of the actual people on the ground. It’s so easy at a place like Harvard to discuss the grand strategies and the budgets and the politics — and forget that out in Afghanistan today there’s an 18-year-old kid fighting for his life.”Kurt White, J.D./M.B.A. ’11Captain, U.S. Army, IraqHe is a West Point graduate now serving an 18-month stint with the National Guard in Massachusetts. During the first of two Iraq tours, he was an infantry platoon leader starting a week after the fall of Baghdad — and “I still trust my experiences more than what I see in the news.”At Harvard, where there are so few veterans, other students meeting them “really want to know and learn, and ask.”Scott OsterlingScott Osterling, M.P.A./M.B.A. ’10Captain, U.S. Army, IraqHe was inspired to join the military by a high school teacher who was deployed in the first Gulf War. After 18 months in Korea as an infantry officer he did two tours in Iraq as a Green Beret — and today “it’s sometimes hard to be on the sidelines.”One impression from the Nov. 11, 2009 ceremony for Medal of Honor winners at the Memorial Church: “Harvard has a tremendous history of service to the country.”Nathaniel Davis, M.P.A. ’11Captain, U.S. Army, IraqStill on active duty, he said his next posting will be to teach at West Point. During 19 months in Iraq, he worked in an infantry unit trying to reduce sectarian violence — “cleansing” operations by Shiite factions against their Sunni neighbors. Abandoned Sunni houses were stripped of anything valuable, he said, and often only family photos were left. “You would see a family photo. You’d see father, mother, daughter, son, baby. You’d go in the front yard and start digging, and you’d find them a mass grave: father, mother, daughter, son, baby.”At Harvard, “We bring a current, realistic perspective on ongoing conflicts and the capabilities and limitations of Western powers to intervene in those conflicts.” It’s “where strategies meet resources.”Christopher Cannon (soldier on the left)Christopher Cannon, M.P.A. ’11Captain, U.S. Army, Iraq and AfghanistanIn April 2004, he was in Baghdad’s Sadr City, which was ground zero for the Shiite insurgency, when he was caught in an ambush. Cannon was wounded in one calf. “If there’s a good place to get shot, I got shot in that place.” His second combat tour was with a civil affairs team on a PRT (provincial reconstruction team) in Ghazni Province, Afghanistan, a unit that was “the eyes and ears of our commander.” He turned 26 in Iraq and 30 in Afghanistan.As for what’s next: “I still want to serve, just not necessarily at the tip of the spear of our foreign policy.”Jordan Brehove, M.P.A./M.B.A. (HKS/Wharton) ’11Captain, U.S. Army, IraqHe is still in the Reserves, where he has served in a drill sergeants’ training company and as an assistant professor of military science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. During his second tour in Iraq, his convoy vehicle was hit 23 times by IEDs (improvised explosive devices).Of the hard work in school, he said, “It’s a great problem to have.”Thomas RubelThomas Rubel ’13Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, IraqHe joined the service right out of Phillips Exeter Academy, when colleges were recruiting him to play lacrosse. He did two tours in Iraq, starting the first as an 18-year-old lance corporal and ending the second on the day he turned 21.Why he joined: “I just decided I wanted to do something else. Kids my age were fighting overseas.”Jon Gensler, M.P.A./M.B.A. (HKS/Sloan) ’11Captain, U.S. Army, IraqA Russian and German major at West Point, he was assigned to a tank unit that at the start of the Iraq War penetrated nearly to the Iranian border. He helped to train Iraqi police and fought in the Sunni Triangle.“Military veterans have a strong sense of consequences for their actions, which is something we can share in the classroom.”last_img read more

EU-China Year of Tourism: Korcula, Rijeka and Zagreb among 30 EU cities in the “light bridge” project

first_imgToday, many European landmarks will be illuminated in red to mark the EU-China Year of Tourism (ECTY), and the pan – European celebration coincides with the Lantern Festival in China, which marks the end of New Year ‘s festivities. The “Light Bridge” is part of an ambitious program of activities carried out on the occasion of the EU-China Tourism Year.The “light bridge” project involves 30 cities from 12 EU member states and aims to raise awareness of lesser-known European destinations in China, and is also an opportunity for European and Chinese communities to get to know and appreciate each other’s culture better. to promote the EU as a travel destination in China, to provide opportunities to increase bilateral cooperation and mutual understanding, and to create an impetus for progress in market opening and visa facilitation.The Tourist Board of the City of Rijeka has joined the celebration of the EU-China Year of Tourism, which is celebrated today, March 2, 2018. On that occasion, a “light bridge” program with the theme of the year is being implemented all over the world, and on that occasion, the Trsat Castle will shine in red. Today, in Korčula, the Tourist Board of the City of Korčula will mark the 2018 year of EU and Chinese tourism, supporting the EU Light Bridge project with events in cooperation with the city institutions of Korčula. Thus, an exhibition of books with archival material about Marco Polo will be opened, as well as a lecture about this world traveler and researcher. In the evening, the Veliki Revelin tower will be illuminated, which will include Korčula in the “light bridge” project, which is being implemented in 30 cities from 12 EU countries.Since 2018 has been declared the year of EU and Chinese tourism, from 12 to 16 February, in cooperation with the City of Zagreb, the Embassy of the People’s Republic of China and the Zagreb Tourist Board, the Chinese New Year and, at the same time, the EU-China Light Bridge project . Zagreb’s fountains are lit by lanterns, and the fountains themselves will shine with the traditional red color of the flag of the People’s Republic of China. At the representative entrance to the city center, in this way, Zagreb and China will be symbolically connected, whose inhabitants are among the most numerous visitors to the city. Namely, in 2017 in Zagreb there was an increase of 36 percent in the arrival of Chinese guests (42.202) and 25 percent in overnight stays (56.707), which made guests from China enter the ten most numerous visitors to Zagreb for the first time.The organization of this international event is carried out by the European Commission in cooperation with the European Tourism Commission and the Chinese National Tourism Organization and with the support of other institutions that are preparing a “light bridge” on major monuments and sights.last_img read more

DGS records success in sports; other inter-school competitions

first_img Share Sharing is caring! EducationLocalNewsSecondary DGS records success in sports; other inter-school competitions by: – March 27, 2012 Share 185 Views   no discussionscenter_img Tweet Share Sports Teacher Neshara Sorhaindo during Phys Ed class at the DGSRoseau, Dominica – The Dominica Grammar School (DGS) is riding a wave of success in inter-school competitions held recently. The DGS recorded impressive wins in the Secondary Schools Athletics Championships held last week, capturing 25 gold medals, 17 silver medals and 6 bronze medals to take the top spot as overall champions.The U-14 netball team also defeated the Portsmouth Secondary School in the finals, 18-7, and the school is also the current volleyball champions after defeating the Dominica State College 3-2 sets earlier this month.The DGS is also the reigning U-15 Boys Football champion.Sports Teacher, Neshara Sorhaindo said these performances prove that there are hardworking students at the DGS who are striving to overcome the challenges posed by anti-social behaviour at their school.Winners of the Rotaract Club Literacy Competition with Literature teacher at the DGS Giselle Mondesire“The children have been working tirelessly to achieve their goals. I think this is a boost after all the negativity that has been attached to the school recently. The majority of students are very optimistic and are doing their best to excel in all disciplines,” she said.Sorhaindo said the DGS has also experienced success in disciplines other than sport.Earlier this month, Ashner De Jean and Dilano Miller won the literacy competition organised by the Rotaract Club and Cleopatra Christopher and Joanne Jno Baptiste competed in the semi finals of the Kiwanis Club Debating Competition.Last Friday Dimitri Raphael won the quiz competition organised by the Allaince Francaise de la Dominique as part of French Day activities and Kellin Juliana, Angel Joseph and Bernika Samuel won the song competition.Also, at the recently held Youth Parliament to mark Commonwealth Day 2012, Peaches Green was adjudged Best Role Player. By: Dionne DurandPublic Relations Specialist, Ministry of Education and Human Resource Developmentlast_img read more

Arkansas Spring Nationals checkers fly twice for Taylor

first_imgBATESVILLE, Ark. (March 25-26) – Another early-season special at Batesville Motor Speedway brought out the best in Jeff Taylor.Taylor swept $1,000 to win Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified main events on Friday and Saturday during the Arkansas Spring Nationals lidlifter.He’d brought the broom to Batesville as recently as 2014, winning all three season-starting special main events that spring as well.“I was really comfortable with my car,” said Taylor, coming off an IMCA career-best 14 feature wins in 2015 and already on the ballot for the upcoming Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational. “I’ve been racing here since 1996. I don’t know how many laps I’ve got here but I learned from the best. My car could do anything this weekend.”Taylor started Friday’s 30-lapper from inside the second row and led most of the way, holding off Tyler Droste after getting into lapped traffic.Droste got a look inside Taylor once but wasn’t able to get by and settled for second. Richie Tosh, Robby Arnold and Brint Hartwick completed the top five.Arnold, Tosh, Hartwick and Droste finished in that order behind Taylor in the Saturday main event pared to 25 laps after a multi-car incident.Taylor had started fifth and passed brother Peyton for the front spot on lap 11.Feature ResultsMarch 25 – 1. Jeff Taylor; 2. Tyler Droste; 3. Richie Tosh; 4. Robby Arnold; 5. Brint Hartwick; 6. Clay Norris; 7. Mark Norris; 8. Brandon Smith; 9. Bennett Johnson; 10. Daryl Hay; 11. Rick Engles; 12. Chris Junkersfeld; 13. Peyton Taylor; 14. Mike Bowers; 15. Drew Armstrong; 16. Tyson Franks; 17. Timothy Culp; 18. Buck Reid; 19. Kris Lloyd; 20. Heath Grizzle; 21. Travis Mosley; 22. Jeremy Tharp; 23. Mikey Bell; 24. Brian Ritchie.March 26 – 1. Jeff Taylor; 2. Arnold; 3. Tosh; 4. Hartwick; 5. Droste; 6. Mosley; 7. Mark Norris; 8. Bowers; 9. Armstrong; 10. Clay Norris; 11. Engles; 12. Brandon Smith; 13. Johnson; 14. Bell; 15. Hay; 16. Tyler Newcom; 17. Lloyd; 18. Gage Raines; 19. Blake Smith; 20. Junkersfeld; 21. Tommy Burkhead; 22. Ritchie; 23. Chadd Avery; 24. Peyton Taylor; 25. Daniel Roe.last_img read more

Premier League clubs discuss options but left in limbo

first_imgBy Simon EvansMANCHESTER, England (Reuters) – Premier League clubs on Friday discussed possible models for finishing the current season but did not consider a specific date for play to resume while U.K. government lockdown restrictions remain in place.Representatives of the 20 teams took part in a conference call to look at various possible options for restarting the season and remain committed to completing the fixtures rather than voiding the season.But after the government announced on Thursday that the lockdown would remain in place for at least another three weeks, all options remain hypothetical.A Premier League spokesperson said: “Today’s Shareholders’ Meeting provided an opportunity to discuss possible scheduling models. It remains our objective to complete the 2019-20 season but at this stage all dates are tentative while the impact of COVID-19 develops.“In common with other businesses and industries, the Premier League and our clubs are working through complex planning scenarios.“We are actively engaging with stakeholders, including broadcast partners, and our aim is to ensure we are in a position to resume playing when it is safe to do so and with the full support of the Government.“The health and wellbeing of players, coaches, managers, club staff and supporters are our priority and the League will only restart when medical guidance allows.”There was no discussion during the meeting of the possible complications that could be caused by the season running beyond June 30 — when some player and manager contracts run out.World soccer’s governing body FIFA has stated that contracts should be adjusted to reflect the actual end of the season. However, that issue could be open to challenge under English law.The Football League (EFL), which represents the three divisions below the Premier League, has said that teams should not return to training before May 16 “at the earliest”.Should teams be allowed to train it is expected they would need two-to-three weeks to get prepared for the return to action, making the earliest possible return in June.But with the ban on mass public gatherings likely to be one of the last restrictions to be removed, rescheduled games could well be held behind closed doors.last_img read more