Tech Prediction for 2014: As BYOD Matures, BYOI Is Waiting in the Wings

first_imgThe analyst firm IDC has cleverly delineated the evolution of computing over the past 40+ years into three eras or platforms – the mainframe platform of the 70’s, the client/server platform of the 90’s, and the Big Data, Cloud, Social, and Mobile platform of today.One of the interesting trends of this third platform and the rapid and extensive proliferation of mobile technology that has been one of its hallmarks is the consumerization of IT. Companies are giving employees greater latitude in accessing corporate resources and data via their own personal devices (Bring Your Own Device or BYOD).In 2014, we will begin to see the next wave of the consumerization of IT with the emergence of the consumerization of ID or identity.  Just as employees pushed for the simplicity of a single mobile device for both their personal and professional needs, they are beginning to push for a simpler, yet controlled, system of identification for authorization of personal and professional device usage.We are witnessing the dawn of Bring (and Control) Your Own Identity (BYOI), which will be marked by two developments:Our digital identities will become consolidated, centralized, and secured on our devices and less entrusted to external parties like Facebook and Google.The security industry’s growing adoption of an Intelligence-Driven Security model will mean identity is less a perimeter-based gateway and more a multi-faceted, continuously authenticating process that is more seamlessly integrated within our workflow.As it turns out, BYOD was only the beginning.  Brace yourself for 2014 and BYOI.You can see more of Art’s predictions for 2014 in his end of year letter.—More Predictions for 2014SDx (Software-Defined Everything) by Amitabh Srivastava, President, Advanced Software DivisionA Battle Cry for Protected Storage by Stephen Manley, Chief Technology Officer, Data Protection & Availability DivisionSoftware-Defined in Two Architectures by Josh Kahn, Senior Vice President, Global Solutions MarketingBringing Hadoop to Your Big Data by Bill Richter, President, EMC IsilonA Whole New World by CJ Desai, President, Emerging Technologies DivisionTargeting the Value Office to Transform IT Business by Rick Devenuti, President, Information Intelligence GroupIT’s Ability to Evolve Quickly by Vic Bhagat, Chief Information OfficerService Orientation, Big Data Lakes, & Security Product Rationalization by Tom Roloff, Senior Vice President, EMC Global Serviceslast_img read more

Earth: It Gives You a Lifetime, Can You Give It an Hour?

first_imgWhy turn out the lights?One of the neat things about Earth Hour is that it creates a “rolling blackout” (of the good kind) across the planet. As each time zone reaches 8:30pm, people turn out their lights to show their support. Last year that included 12,000 landmarks and participants in 187 countries. This visible (or invisible?) display is meant as a symbolic gesture. Its goal is awareness and longer-term behavior change, not simply to reduce the electricity demand for an hour. That said, the connection between turning out the lights and taking climate action is strong. Throughout most of the world, the majority of electricity is created by burning coal or natural gas – both of which create carbon emissions. Think of Earth Hour as your first step toward taking meaningful climate action.So, it’s dark… now what?I hope you’ll join us by turning off the lights where you are at 8:30pm on Saturday night. What you do once the lights are out is up to you (keep it clean, people). Some of the larger cities have public events – Singapore has had a week-long event with concerts, festivals and a count-down to dimming the skyline Saturday night. Some local Planet teams have organized events and learning opportunities. Planet Bangalore, for example, has a selfie kiosk they’ll be setting up for Earth Hour and Planet Malaysia published a list of “Fun things to do in the dark.” Or you may choose to dine by candlelight or even just go out and look at the stars for a change. What you do is up to you.The important thing is to re-establish a connection with nature.And why is Dell involved?Climate change is an economic, social and environmental challenge with increasingly evident consequences. It is affecting the natural systems around us, changing migration patterns and growing seasons, increasing the frequency and severity of extreme weather and drought, and damaging our oceans.Our products use electricity, and unless you are purchasing 100 percent renewable electricity, that means you are creating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by using them. We continue to work hard to reduce the “embedded emissions” on our end: we work with our suppliers to set GHG emissions reduction targets, we sourced approximately one-quarter of our electricity needs from renewable generation (both purchased and electricity we generated on-site), and we’ve reduced the energy intensity of our entire product portfolio by an astounding 54 percent since 2011.This last one is especially important to our customers, because it affects their carbon footprint (and, obviously, their electricity costs).It’s also important because of the role technology is likely to play in helping the world address climate change. It will take a wide range of concerted, collaborative actions, many of which will be enabled by the products and services we provide. High-performance computing, cloud storage, virtualization, big data analytics and the Internet of Things all have important roles to play in understanding how the climate is changing and in changing the way we manage our world to use less energy, water, and other resources.I’m ready – let’s fight climate changeSo Mother Nature thanks you for your commitment to turn out the lights on Saturday at 8:30pm. Help us let the world know Dell has been participating and show us your selfie of what you do in the dark, tagging #EarthHour and #LegacyofGood. No idea what to do? Host a party, have dinner by candlelight, or find some friends and play.Beyond Saturday, there are plenty of resources out there for you:To learn more about Earth Hour, you can visit their site.Join forces with one of the many environmental organizations working hard to preserve the You may even have an environmentally-focused employee resource group at your own workplace.Find out how Dell is Building a Legacy of Good. This Saturday (March 24) at 8:30 pm, millions of people, businesses and landmarks around the globe will set aside an hour to host events, switch off their lights and make some noise for action on climate change.It’s called Earth Hour, and I’m proud that Dell is once again turning off logo signs on many buildings and darkening areas (where it won’t interfere with safety or security) from 8:30-9:30pm local time. Dell Facilities, Planet ERG and the Legacy of Good team have been working together to support the effort. This story shares one example of how Dell is committed to driving human progress by putting our technology and expertise to work where it can do the most good for people and the planet.We invite you to explore our FY17 Annual update on our 2020 Legacy of Good Plan at legacyofgood.dell.comlast_img read more

Steve Rowan, 54, Wellington: Dec. 17, 1959 – April 8, 2014

first_imgSteve RowanSteve Rowan, 54, of Wellington, died Tuesday, April 8, 2014, at the Golden Living Center in Wellington.Funeral Services will be held at 2 p.m., Friday, April 11, 2014 at the St. John’s Lutheran Church in Wellington. Visitation will be Thursday, April 10, 2014 from 9 a.m., until 8 p.m. Burial will be at the Sumner Memorial Gardens Cemetery in Wellington. A memorial has been established with the St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital and may be left with the Shelley Family Funeral Home. For further information please visit www.shelleyfamilyfh.com.Steve was born December 17, 1959 the son of Eugene and Dorothy (Bunch) Rowan in Wellington, Kansas. He graduated from Wellington High School in 1977 and was a Wichita State University Graduate. Steve was a pharmaceutical sales rep working for GlaxcoSmithKline, he enjoyed his work. Steve’s hobbies included, golfing and Wichita State Sports. Steve also enjoyed watching both of his children’s sporting activities.Steve is survived by his mother, Dorothy Rowan of Wellington; a son, Samuel Rowan of Ellicott City, MD and a daughter, Gabrielle Rowan of Ellicott City, MD; aunts, Lela Fowler of Blackwell, OK, Betty Day of Braman, OK, and his uncle, Alan Rowan of Wichita, KS; cousins, Fred Fowler of Houston, Texas, Rick Rowan of Oklahoma City, Okla., Dwight Rowan of Wellington, Craig Day of Braman, OK, and Mindy Evans of Clearwater.He is preceded in death by his father, Eugene Rowan in 1994.last_img read more