Michael Tinkham

first_imgMichael Tinkham, Rumford Professor of Physics and Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics in the Physics Department and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Emeritus, who was internationally known for his contributions to condensed matter physics, in particular superconductivity, died in Portland, Oregon, on November 4, 2010, of complications following a stroke.  He was 82 years old.Mike was an experimental physicist with a gift for theory and a nose for important challenging problems.  After graduating from Ripon College in Wisconsin in 1951 with a bachelor’s degree in physics, he proceeded to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he received his master’s degree and Ph.D. in just three years.  His thesis, “Theory of the Fine Structure of the Molecular Oxygen Ground State with an Experimental Study of its Microwave Paramagnetic Spectrum,” was published in 1955.  He changed his interests from gaseous magnetic oxygen to the understanding of properties in solids with a classic study of magnetic properties of transition metal ions in a diamagnetic lattice as a postdoctoral fellow at the Clarendon Laboratory in Oxford University from 1954-1955.  Mike then moved to the University of California in Berkeley as a postdoctoral fellow in 1955, and joined the faculty there in 1957.At Berkeley Mike wrote his first book, Group Theory and Quantum Mechanics (1964).  His research was predominantly in superconductivity and magnetism.  This was an era when the understanding of superconductivity in metals was just emerging after many decades of study and lack of understanding.  Together with Rolf Glover III, a fellow postdoc, he set up a laboratory and measured the absorption/transmission of far infrared light passing through thin superconducting films. The remarkable result was that more light passed through the films in the superconducting state than in the higher temperature normal metal phase.  The far IR measurements as a function of frequency showed the existence of the superconducting energy gap.  These observations preceded the just-developing Bardeen-Cooper-Schriefer (BCS) theory of superconductivity and were key evidence in support of the theory.  His double-pronged research group in superconductivity and magnetism created an exciting environment, and Berkeley was an important stop for travelling scientists to visit Mike and his group and observe the latest findings.  In 1974 Mike was awarded the Oliver Buckley Prize of the American Physical Society for outstanding theoretical or experimental contributions to condensed matter physics based upon that work.In 1966 Mike accepted an offer from the Physics Department at Harvard University, where he spent the rest of his career.  Superconductivity continued as the main focus of his research.  His deep understanding of superconductivity led him to write his second book, Introduction to Superconductivity (1975), which clearly elucidated the subtle mysteries of the subject and has become a classic in the field.  In the early seventies, together with his postdocs and students, he made important advances in understanding the effect of thermal fluctuations on broadening the transition between superconducting and normal states.  With his deep understanding of the subtle theoretical underpinnings of superconductivity, he led a research activity to study many properties of the superconducting state.  With members of his group he applied those ideas to phase-slip centers, current flow across the superconductor-normal interface, and the subharmonic energy-gap structure in superconducting metallic weak links.  Mike moved with the times.  At Harvard he led in the development of the first central labs for producing materials on a nanoscopic level.  He and his group studied submicron tunnel junctions capacitively coupled to minute islands, the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in arrays of Josephson junctions, and tiny metallic whiskers grown on carbon nanotubes.Until his retirement Mike maintained a large active research group.  Graduate students were attracted to him for his ability to make complex ideas seem simple and to offer thesis problems on the leading edge of the field.  He encouraged his students to explore new directions, giving them full freedom to follow their own ideas and develop as creative scientists.  He hungered for data from his labs and had an uncanny talent for transforming scraps of experimental data into an ever-deeper understanding of superconductivity.  Over 45 students received their Ph.D.s under Mike’s tutelage.  His well-trained students and postdocs easily found positions at leading universities and research laboratories.Mike loved good food, good wine, and special desserts, sampling them all over the world.  His students were devoted and had an annual “Tinkham Dinner” at the March meeting of the American Physical Society.  Throughout most of his career he was quite formal and wore a coat and tie for most occasions, sometimes with a funny cap for the Boston weather.  But this attire did not hinder his fun with his students.  A special Science Center lecture to the interested public was advertised by a large colorful sign titled “Superconductivity” only to be doctored by his students on the night of the presentation to read “Sex and Superconductivity.”  He once walked into his lab where some of his students were having lunch and was upset to find that none of the homemade electronics were labeled. He demanded that everything in the lab be labeled for the next generation. The next day he found all the equipment duly labeled and his students sitting with bowed heads.  When they were asked to look up, Mike saw five foreheads labeled “Graduate Student.”Mike is survived by his wife, Mary Tinkham, his sons, Jeff and Chris, and two grandchildren, all now living in Portland, Oregon.  His colleagues and students, deeply saddened by his passing, will always remember his warmth, friendliness, and enthusiasm, as well as the depth of understanding and insights he brought to physics.Respectfully submitted,Venkatesh NarayanamurtiRobert M. WesterveltIsaac F. Silvera, Chairlast_img read more

Kambi powers JSC Bulgaria’s Molodovan adventure

first_img Kambi and DraftKings agree on final closure terms July 24, 2020 Kambi takes full control of LeoVegas sportsbook portfolio August 26, 2020 Share Stockholm-listed sports betting platform supplier Kambi Group Plc has strengthened its partnership with Bulgarian National Lottery operator JSC securing an ‘extended sportsbook agreement’.The enhanced partnership will see Kambi continue to act as lead sportsbook supplier of JSC’s flagship 7777.bg brand within the Bulgarian market, a contract Kambi has maintained since 2017.  In addition, JSC has commissioned Kambi to support its planned entry into the Moldovan market this summer, providing its multi-channel sportsbook products and systems.Updating stakeholders, Milen Ganev, Managing Partner of National Lottery JSC commented: “When replacing our previous sports betting supplier with Kambi, we did so with the goal of becoming a market leader in Bulgaria, a position we’ve achieved well ahead of time.“This triumph, coupled with Kambi’s scalable technology, gives us the freedom to expand into new markets, beginning with Moldova and the Moldovan National Lottery monopoly later this year. We therefore decided to extend our contract with Kambi, enabling us to enter the next chapter of our exciting growth story with confidence.”In 2016, Molodova’s government passed legislation regulating gambling activities under a national monopoly framework.JSC, a syndicated member of the World Lottery Association, would win a 15-year tender  commissioned by  Moldova’s Public Property Agency to run both its national lottery product and a brand new online and retail sportsbook, as part of a public-private partnership.Moving forward, Kambi will support National Lottery JSC by providing its multi-channel Sportsbook product, with plans to go live online in the next few months, followed by a retail rollout where the Kambi Sportsbook will be available to players in local stores and soon-to-be developed sports betting shops.Kristian Nylén – KambiBacking JSC plans, Kristian Nylén, CEO of Kambi, said: “Kambi’s track record of springboarding partners to the next level of their sportsbook journey is unrivalled, and in National Lottery JSC we have yet another example of how operators can grow using our Sportsbook.“For the 7777.bg brand to be among the market leaders in Bulgaria within 18 months of partnership is testament to the quality of the Kambi Sportsbook, as well as the National Lottery’s marketing expertise.“I’m delighted we’ve agreed to take the partnership to Moldova, where I’m confident players will enjoy our exciting sports betting experiences in both the online and retail environments.” StumbleUpon Related Articles Share Submit Kambi takes control of Churchill Downs BetAmerica sportsbook August 28, 2020last_img read more

Steve Rowan, 54, Wellington: Dec. 17, 1959 – April 8, 2014

first_imgSteve RowanSteve Rowan, 54, of Wellington, died Tuesday, April 8, 2014, at the Golden Living Center in Wellington.Funeral Services will be held at 2 p.m., Friday, April 11, 2014 at the St. John’s Lutheran Church in Wellington. Visitation will be Thursday, April 10, 2014 from 9 a.m., until 8 p.m. Burial will be at the Sumner Memorial Gardens Cemetery in Wellington. A memorial has been established with the St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital and may be left with the Shelley Family Funeral Home. For further information please visit www.shelleyfamilyfh.com.Steve was born December 17, 1959 the son of Eugene and Dorothy (Bunch) Rowan in Wellington, Kansas. He graduated from Wellington High School in 1977 and was a Wichita State University Graduate. Steve was a pharmaceutical sales rep working for GlaxcoSmithKline, he enjoyed his work. Steve’s hobbies included, golfing and Wichita State Sports. Steve also enjoyed watching both of his children’s sporting activities.Steve is survived by his mother, Dorothy Rowan of Wellington; a son, Samuel Rowan of Ellicott City, MD and a daughter, Gabrielle Rowan of Ellicott City, MD; aunts, Lela Fowler of Blackwell, OK, Betty Day of Braman, OK, and his uncle, Alan Rowan of Wichita, KS; cousins, Fred Fowler of Houston, Texas, Rick Rowan of Oklahoma City, Okla., Dwight Rowan of Wellington, Craig Day of Braman, OK, and Mindy Evans of Clearwater.He is preceded in death by his father, Eugene Rowan in 1994.last_img read more

Track & Field Readies For MVC Championship

first_img ESPN3 – Saturday MVC Championship Schedule The Bulldogs travel to Wichita following a strong outdoor season with successive improvements each competition. Currently, the Bulldogs have recorded 25 performances this season that rank in the top-10 in the MVC this season. Live Results In the MVC’s annual pre-championship poll, Drake’s men’s team was projected for finish seventh as was the women’s team. Wichita State was the near unanimous choice to sweep the men’s and women’s titles.   Action for the Bulldogs begins Friday at 2 p.m. with the men’s hammer throw and continues on the track with events starting at 6 p.m. at Cessna Stadium. Field events begin Saturday at 3 p.m. for the teams with track events starting at 5 p.m. The final day of action on Sunday starts at 11:30 a.m. The Drake University men’s and women’s track and field teams begin the championship portion of their season this weekend with the annual Missouri Valley Conference Championship in Wichita, Kan. Heat Sheets  Print Friendly Version Portions of each day’s action will be broadcast on The Valley on ESPN3. Friday’s broadcast begins at 7:50 p.m., Saturday at 4:45 p.m. and Sunday at 12:55 p.m. ESPN3 – Sunday The hurdles again look to be a strong area for the Bulldogs with four men ranking in the top eight in the MVC in the 400-meter hurdles with senior and defending MVC Champion Bas Van Leersum (Zaandam, The Netherlands) leading the way with his time of 51.35 set last weekend at Nebraska. In the women’s 100-meter hurdles, Mary Young (Urbandale, Iowa) owns the top time in the league at 13.30 set at the Drake Relays. Senior Reed Fischer (Minnetonka, Minn.) is entered in both the 5,000 and 10,000 meters, two events in which he owns the top time in the MVC. His time of 13:48.22 set at the Drake Relays shattered the 30-year-old Drake school record in the event. The women’s distance crew is led by Bailee Cofer (Overland Park, Kan.) who owns the seventh-fastest 10,000-meter time in the league. Story Links ESPN3 – Friday last_img read more