Hedwig Star Darren Criss on Where His Heart Is

first_img Hedwig and the Angry Inch Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 13, 2015 Darren Criss Darren Criss stopped by TODAY on May 20 to chat about returning to the Great White Way in Hedwig and the Angry Inch. The former Glee star, who won a Broadway.com Audience Choice Award for his portrayal of our favorite internationally ignored song stylist, is already “so sad at the idea of it ever being over.” However we can all take heart, as although Criss will depart the Belasco Theatre on July 19, it sounds like he won’t be away from the Main Stem for too long. “I come from the theater, my heart will always be in the theater, there’s nothing like it,” he told Kathie Lee and Hoda. Check out the interview with the adorable Criss below. View Comments Related Showslast_img read more

IPE Views: Beware the stimulus hype

first_imgIn that respect Philip Hammond, the Chancellor of the Exchequer (finance minister), was right to identify the UK’s weak productivity as a key problem to address. In his official speech he noted that: “We lag the US and Germany by some 30 percentage points. But we also lag France by over 20 and Italy by eight.”He went on to spell out what this means in practice: “It takes a German worker four days to produce what we make in five; which means, in turn, that too many British workers work longer hours for lower pay than their counterparts.”The subsequent news that real wages look likely to be lower in 2021 than they were in 2008 underlined the scale of the problem. If productivity does not increase then wages will continue to stagnate.Hammond’s proposed solution is the creation of a National Productivity Investment Fund that will provide £23bn of additional spending over five years. Its focus will be on transport, digital communications, research and development (R&D), and housing.The most striking thing about this proposal is how small the planned spending is relative to the scale of the problem. The UK’s GDP is about £1.9trn so an extra £4.6bn a year is a tiny amount in contrast.In addition, £7.2bn of the proposed new fund will go to housing. There is nothing wrong with that in principle – on the contrary, the UK’s decaying housing stock could do with much more investment – but it will not raise productivity. Investment in housing is essential to improving living standards, which is welcome, but it does not contribute to making future production more efficient.Increasing productivity cannot be achieved simply by spending more money. Another key requirement is a willingness to stop state support for unproductive or “zombie” companies. In the authorities’ desperation to keep the economy ticking over, for instance by allowing the provision of cheap credit, otherwise defunct firms are often allowed to survive. Such action hinders the economic process of creative destruction that is essential to dynamic growth in any market economy. This problem is apparent in Japan where economic growth has remained weak despite several attempt at fiscal stimulus.From this perspective the two common reactions to the Autumn Statement can be put into context. For a start, the scale of the fiscal boost, at least on the spending side, is tiny relative to the huge task of bolstering productivity.In addition, the discussion of Brexit in this context is a diversion. It is hard to make any meaningful estimate of its likely cost when the form it will take remains so uncertain. Meanwhile, the preoccupation with the subject obscures the fact that Britain’s weak productivity record long predates the Brexit referendum. The problem would exist whether or not the UK was in the European Union.Although the UK’s circumstances are unique, there are broader international lessons to be learnt. The widely anticipated fiscal stimulus from the incoming Trump administration in the US could also be on a smaller scale than much of the discussion suggests. Talking about improving infrastructure is much easier than doing it. Ensuring it bolsters innovation and economic growth is particularly tough.With the global pendulum swinging towards fiscal stimulus it is more important than ever to separate the reality from the hype. The UK seems to have fallen in line with a growing international consensus on the need for fiscal stimulus. Central banks seem to be “running out of ammo”, to use the favoured expression, so higher public spending and tax cuts are gaining political support.Infrastructure spending in particular is coming into favour. Not only does infrastructure across the developed economies need more investment, but such spending could bolster economic activity more widely. Its advocates contend that improving infrastructure makes economies more efficient and so helps generate future growth. Better roads, railways and telecommunications are all welcomed in this respect.The UK’s plans were announced on Wednesday in what is known as the Autumn Statement (one of two annual sets of parliamentary proclamations on the government’s fiscal plans). In broad terms there were two reactions to it. First, it was hailed as a dramatic break from the harsh austerity of the previous government. Second, there was a lot of excitement about its implicit estimate of the likely cost of Brexit to the British economy (£58.7bn (€69bn) judging by additional borrowing costs).But a closer examination shows that, at best, these points are secondary. The plans should be judged in relation to their stated goals.last_img read more

Cilic beats Muller to set up quarterfinal against Querrey at Queen’s Club

first_imgThe big-serving American won in just under two hours against Wawrinka, a three-time Grand Slam singles champion.The first two sets were even, but Querrey ran away with the decider to set up a meeting with Cilic at the Wimbledon warmup tournament.Wawrinka is yet to find his top form after a double knee operation but said he must be patient.“For sure, I’m sad and frustrated because I need to win matches, I want to win matches and I want more. That’s for sure,” the Swiss said.“But there is a lot to take in the right way, and I’m sure if I can, as I say, keep doing the right things day by day, building on this and keep trying to improve, the results will come. I need to be patient with that.”ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Professional wrestler ‘Vader’ passes away at 63 Also, Frances Tiafoe beat Leonardo Mayer 6-4, 2-6, 6-4 to set up a last-eight clash with Jeremy Chardy. The Frenchman beat Russian Daniil Medvedev 7-6 (6), 6-3.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Bicol riders extend help to Taal evacuees Christopher Tolkien, son of Lord of the Rings author, dies aged 95 Taal victims get help from Kalayaan town Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina “It was not easy, he (Muller) broke me in the beginning of the match and served out the first set,” said Cilic, who is a genuine threat on grass.“I managed to keep my composure and managed to serve well … It’s last year’s form, it continued this year, grass suits me greatly for my game, my shots hitting flat and deep through the court and serving well.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownCilic was champion in 2012 at Queen’s Club and runner-up also in 2013. He came close at Wimbledon last year, losing to Roger Federer after suffering from bad blisters in the final.Fifth-seeded Querrey, the winner here in 2010, beat Stan Wawrinka 7-5, 6-7 (3), 6-1. Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Harvey Weinstein rape trial LATEST STORIES In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Marin Cilic of Croatia celebrates winning his singles tennis match against Gilles Muller of Luxembourg at the Queen’s Club tennis tournament in London, Wednesday, June 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)LONDON — Top-seeded Marin Cilic set up a quarterfinal with Sam Querrey after coming from a set down to beat Gilles Muller 4-6, 6-3, 6-3 at Queen’s Club on Wednesday.Cilic was the losing finalist in the grass-court tournament and at Wimbledon in 2017.ADVERTISEMENT Cloudy skies over Luzon due to amihanlast_img read more