Press release: Local COVID alert level update for South Yorkshire

first_img Barnsley Doncaster Rotherham the City of Sheffield people must not socialise with anybody they do not live with, or have formed a support bubble with, in any indoor setting or in any private garden or at most outdoor hospitality venues and ticketed events people must not socialise in a group of more than 6 in an outdoor public space such as a park or beach, the countryside, a public garden or a sports venue all pubs and bars must close, unless they are serving substantial meals people should try to avoid travelling outside the very high alert level or entering a very high alert level area, other than for work, education or for caring responsibilities or to travel through as part of a longer journey residents should avoid staying overnight in another part of the UK, and others should avoid staying overnight in the very high alert area I would like to thank the Mayor of the Sheffield City Region Dan Jarvis and the leaders of the local councils of South Yorkshire for the constructive discussions we have had about how to get the virus under control in the region. Given rates are amongst the highest in the country I am pleased that we were able to reach an agreement that ensures swift action is taken in accordance with the public health advice. I fully recognise the huge impact this will have on communities in the area and the sacrifices people will be making. That’s why we have agreed an extensive package of support for local people, businesses and councils. The restrictions we have agreed together will only be in place for as long as they are absolutely necessary. They will be reviewed jointly in 28 days’ time. The government is totally committed to working with local leaders as we tackle this challenge, for the benefit of all the people of South Yorkshire. I’m very grateful to the local leadership in South Yorkshire who have worked together closely, cross party, on the need for additional measures to protect lives and livelihoods. A failure to act now would only lead to tougher and longer lasting restrictions later. I understand the sacrifice people in South Yorkshire have already made and the enormous impact further measures will have on people’s lives. That is why we are also providing support to businesses and contact tracing activity across South Yorkshire. Now is the time for us all to work together to get this virus under control. The rate of COVID-19 infections is rising rapidly across the UK.The case rate in England stood at 169 people per 100,000 from 9 October to 15 October, up from 100 people per 100,000 for the week 25 September to 1 October. Cases are not evenly spread, with infection rates rising more rapidly in some areas than others.In South Yorkshire rates are among the highest in the country and continuing to rise rapidly with case rates ranging from 285 people per 100,000 in Doncaster up to 402 people per 100,000 in Sheffield.Although originally focused on the younger population, we are seeing rises in the older population now as well. In order to reduce these numbers and ensure that the NHS isn’t overwhelmed and has capacity to treat other conditions we need to act now.To support the local authority during this period, the government will be providing a financial support package. In addition to the £ 1 billion of funding the Prime Minister set out on Monday 12 October. This includes additional funding of £11.2 million for local enforcement and contact tracing activity.Additional financial support will also be provided for local companies – recognising the additional strain these measures will place on businesses.Local COVID alert level very high will take effect across all parts of South Yorkshire. It will cover: Following close discussions with local leaders, South Yorkshire will move from local COVID alert level high to very high from 00.01 on Saturday 24 October. This means that new measures will come into place including: Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said: Sheffield: 402 Barnsley: 367 Rotherham: 341 Doncaster: 285 In addition, following discussions with local leaders it was agreed that from 00.01 on Saturday 24 October additional closures will include: Local Government Secretary Robert Jenrick said: All available data for the areas that will move to local COVID alert level very high at 00.01 on Saturday 24 October have been assessed by the government, including the Health and Social Care Secretary, NHS Test and Trace including the Joint Biosecurity Centre (JBC), Public Health England (PHE), the Chief Medical Officer and the Cabinet Office. Data assessed includes incidence, test positivity and the growth rate of the virus.It is essential that these outbreaks are contained to protect lives and our NHS, and prevent greater economic damage in the future. We face a new challenge as we head into the winter, and we know that even mild cases of COVID-19 can have devastating consequences for people in all age groups, along with the risk of Long COVID.Our strategy is to suppress the virus while supporting the economy, education and the NHS, until an effective vaccine is widely available. Local action is at the centre of our response, and engagement with local authorities is, and will continue to be, a key part of this process.Background informationThe 7-day case rates per 100,000 for South Yorkshire are as follows: betting shops adult gaming centres casinos soft play centres On 12 October, the government introduced a new, simplified framework for local interventions based around 3 new local COVID alert levels.The postcode checker shows which alert level applies in each area.The NHS COVID-19 app will also direct people to this information.We have provided £3.7 billion of funding to local authorities in England to respond to pressures in all their services.The Prime Minister also announced on Monday 12 October additional COVID funding of around £1billion which will provide Local Authorities with additional money to protect vital services. The Government will set out further information in due course on how this new funding will be allocated.See guidance on each local COVID alert level.Throughout the pandemic, the government has listened carefully to the views of the scientific community, in particular the information from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) and its sub-groups when taking decisions on the best way to tackle the pandemic.last_img read more

Contrasts between past and present

first_imgCambridge is half a world away from Iraq and Afghanistan for most Americans, but not for U.S. veterans of those long-running wars. As many as 150 veterans are now students at Harvard, where they have adjusted from combat zones to tidy classrooms, as they study business, government, and law. In a series of interviews, two dozen vets discussed the startling contrasts between past and present. A few shared perspectives from overseas.Oasis GarciaOasis Garcia, M.P.A./M.B.A. (HKS/Wharton) ’12 Captain, U.S. Army, IraqOut of high school, his first service was with the U.S. Marine Corps Band as a trumpet player. Later, as an Army officer, he was an embedded adviser to the Iraqi army and border patrol.“The military opens doors so long as you accept the responsibilities that lie on the other side.”Hagan Scotten, J.D. ’10Captain, U.S. Army, IraqAfter the rigors of training in Korea (“there are no distractions in Korea”), the Long Island native spent time as a platoon leader — “the plum job, in charge of 40 guys with rifles” — and then post-9/11 on the periphery of Afghanistan, where “I wanted to do more.” He spent three tours in Iraq as a Special Forces officer, conducting raids, collecting and analyzing intelligence, advising Iraqi counterterrorism forces, and managing logistics and convoys. The experience gave him pragmatism, a sense that intelligence is diverse, and insight into national security law. “Experience,” he said, “has some virtue.” After graduation, he will clerk for a year in the D.C. Circuit Court and then with Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts.Of combat veterans at Harvard, said Scotten: “We’re happy to be here.”Joe QuinnJoe Quinn, M.P.P. ’10Captain, U.S. Army, IraqA senior at West Point when his brother James Quinn was killed in the 9/11 attacks on Manhattan. Helped start the Sons of Iraq program, an expansion of the “Sunni Awakening” that reduced violence throughout Iraq.“It’s that experience you really can’t duplicate.”Jason Saunders, M.P.A.-ID/M.B.A. ’12Captain, U.S. Army, Afghanistan and IraqAbout a year and a half after graduating from West Point in 2003, he was a rifle platoon leader in Afghanistan. Redeployed to Iraq in July 2006, he was a logistics officer stationed near the Syrian border.Of youth and warfare, said Saunders: “Going to Afghanistan was my first real job.”Pete HegsethPete Hegseth, M.P.P. ’11Captain, U.S. Army, IraqHe is still in the military with a National Guard unit in Massachusetts and is chairman of VetsforFreedom.org and a frequent television commentator. Served with the 101st Airborne in Iraq and did liaison work with local governments.“Vets come into the classroom with their eyes wide open. Vets also say: I’ve seen the best and the worst.”Jared Esselman, M.P.P. ’11Staff Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, Iraq and AfghanistanAfter high school in Mooresville, N.C., and one desultory year in college, he worked as a ranch hand in Montana and Wyoming before taking a factory job. After the 9/11 attacks, he joined the Air Force, trained as a loadmaster on a C-17, and by February 2003 was flying missions into Afghanistan. While deployed to Iraq, he flew 300 combat sorties before returning to college and, in the summer of 2008, serving as a White House intern.“They say it’s not the years, it’s the mileage,” said the 29-year-old, who plans to return home and run for mayor. “I’ve done things in my lifetime that most people will never do. I’ve stood on almost every continent. I’ve swum in almost every ocean. I’ve seen things that people will never see or ever want to see.”David TierDavid Tier, M.P.A. ’10Major, U.S. Army, IraqStill on active duty. His first duty station was as a tank platoon commander in Korea, where he spent two and a half years. During the second of his three Iraq tours he was a cavalry troop commander and led tactical raids.Of vets in the classroom: “It’s a great thing for Harvard. One, you have perspective from a proven patriot. It’s very difficult to question someone’s motives or patriotism, having risked a certain level. It’s great for the vets too.”Seth Moulton ’01, M.P.A./M.B.A. ’11Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, IraqDeciding to join the Marines long before the 9/11 attacks, he gave the English Oration at his 2001 Harvard Commencement on the need for national service, and went on to serve four tours in Iraq. He was a rifle platoon commander at the beginning of the war, helped to establish free-speech media outlets in Iraq (including a twice-weekly television show with his translator called “Moulton and Mohammed”), served in a Marine unit that saw intense combat with Shiite insurgents in Najaf, and twice served on Team Phoenix, a small-scale group organized by Gen. David Petraeus to study and counter renegade militias.“One thing I certainly try to do in class is bring a little dose of reality to the discussion about what these wars mean in terms of the actual people on the ground. It’s so easy at a place like Harvard to discuss the grand strategies and the budgets and the politics — and forget that out in Afghanistan today there’s an 18-year-old kid fighting for his life.”Kurt White, J.D./M.B.A. ’11Captain, U.S. Army, IraqHe is a West Point graduate now serving an 18-month stint with the National Guard in Massachusetts. During the first of two Iraq tours, he was an infantry platoon leader starting a week after the fall of Baghdad — and “I still trust my experiences more than what I see in the news.”At Harvard, where there are so few veterans, other students meeting them “really want to know and learn, and ask.”Scott OsterlingScott Osterling, M.P.A./M.B.A. ’10Captain, U.S. Army, IraqHe was inspired to join the military by a high school teacher who was deployed in the first Gulf War. After 18 months in Korea as an infantry officer he did two tours in Iraq as a Green Beret — and today “it’s sometimes hard to be on the sidelines.”One impression from the Nov. 11, 2009 ceremony for Medal of Honor winners at the Memorial Church: “Harvard has a tremendous history of service to the country.”Nathaniel Davis, M.P.A. ’11Captain, U.S. Army, IraqStill on active duty, he said his next posting will be to teach at West Point. During 19 months in Iraq, he worked in an infantry unit trying to reduce sectarian violence — “cleansing” operations by Shiite factions against their Sunni neighbors. Abandoned Sunni houses were stripped of anything valuable, he said, and often only family photos were left. “You would see a family photo. You’d see father, mother, daughter, son, baby. You’d go in the front yard and start digging, and you’d find them a mass grave: father, mother, daughter, son, baby.”At Harvard, “We bring a current, realistic perspective on ongoing conflicts and the capabilities and limitations of Western powers to intervene in those conflicts.” It’s “where strategies meet resources.”Christopher Cannon (soldier on the left)Christopher Cannon, M.P.A. ’11Captain, U.S. Army, Iraq and AfghanistanIn April 2004, he was in Baghdad’s Sadr City, which was ground zero for the Shiite insurgency, when he was caught in an ambush. Cannon was wounded in one calf. “If there’s a good place to get shot, I got shot in that place.” His second combat tour was with a civil affairs team on a PRT (provincial reconstruction team) in Ghazni Province, Afghanistan, a unit that was “the eyes and ears of our commander.” He turned 26 in Iraq and 30 in Afghanistan.As for what’s next: “I still want to serve, just not necessarily at the tip of the spear of our foreign policy.”Jordan Brehove, M.P.A./M.B.A. (HKS/Wharton) ’11Captain, U.S. Army, IraqHe is still in the Reserves, where he has served in a drill sergeants’ training company and as an assistant professor of military science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. During his second tour in Iraq, his convoy vehicle was hit 23 times by IEDs (improvised explosive devices).Of the hard work in school, he said, “It’s a great problem to have.”Thomas RubelThomas Rubel ’13Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, IraqHe joined the service right out of Phillips Exeter Academy, when colleges were recruiting him to play lacrosse. He did two tours in Iraq, starting the first as an 18-year-old lance corporal and ending the second on the day he turned 21.Why he joined: “I just decided I wanted to do something else. Kids my age were fighting overseas.”Jon Gensler, M.P.A./M.B.A. (HKS/Sloan) ’11Captain, U.S. Army, IraqA Russian and German major at West Point, he was assigned to a tank unit that at the start of the Iraq War penetrated nearly to the Iranian border. He helped to train Iraqi police and fought in the Sunni Triangle.“Military veterans have a strong sense of consequences for their actions, which is something we can share in the classroom.”last_img read more

MDI football comes up short in state championship game

first_img Latest posts by Taylor Bigler Mace (see all) Bio The Mount Desert Island football team lost the Class C state championship game, but for players, coaches, fans and the community as a whole, the entire season was a win.Wells defeated the Trojans 44-0 on Saturday at Fitzpatrick Stadium, but MDI’s first appearance in the championship game was a victory in and of itself.“We told the kids [Friday] before we came down here that the scoreboard would not be the most important thing on this field today, that it would be the players, and we believe that,” MDI head coach Mark Shields said.Wells a force to be reckoned with from the opening kick, scoring seven touchdowns and a safety while keeping MDI’s offense at bay.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textMDI, the top-seeded team from the North, had a promising start as the Trojans defense held Wells to zero points in the first quarter, but the second quarter started off poorly for them. Wells’ Evan Whitten ran the ball in for a touchdown to cap off a drive in which the Warriors moved the ball with ease, and the extra point was good.The Trojans’ first offensive drive of the second quarter ended quickly as the Wells offense forced the Trojans to turn over on downs. The Warriors scored again on their second possession of the quarter with a touchdown run by Nolan Potter and another made extra point. MDI was again forced to turn the ball over on downs, but the Trojans defense was able to do the same to Wells on the Warriors’ next offensive drive.With just 29 seconds left in the half, MDI’s goal was to hold onto the ball, run out the clock and focus on getting a good start in the second half. Although MDI had the ball as time was running down, the Trojans ended up digging themselves into an an even bigger hole when Wells’ Michael Wrigley intercepted an Andrew Phelps pass and ran unhindered to the end zone to make it 21-0 going into halftime.Things got worse for MDI (9-2) early in the second half when Whitten broke out of the formation for a 40-yard touchdown run. Two series later, as MDI’s Colby Lee prepared to punt from the 7-yard line, Wells’ special teams unit pushed him into the end zone for a safety to make the game 30-0.Early into the fourth quarter, Brody Dempsey broke out for a 32-yard touchdown run and Reidy again knocked in an extra point for a 37-0 lead. Wells (11-1) scored one final time when Nick Hansen ran the ball in for a 45-yard touchdown with seven minutes remaining for the game’s last score.“We are disappointed with the score, the way it turned out,” Shields said. “We thought we could play with this team a little better. The reality is they are a big, fast, strong team and they pushed us around a little today, and we had troubles with that.”Regardless of the score, the Trojans have no reason to hang their heads after what they’ve accomplished this season. they won the Class C North title and made it to the Class C state championship game for the first time in program history.“I think they did an outstanding job. We are very, very proud to be here representing Class C North,” Athletic Director Bunky Dow said. “A lot of people didn’t pick us to go this far, and it’s unfortunate that we may be remembered for this last game, but that shouldn’t take away from what the young men and the coaching staff did all year. They represented the community and the school with pride, and I am very, very proud.”Correction: A photo caption in an earlier version of this article said the Class B title game was played Nov. 18. The game was played Nov. 19. MDI man reaches 41 straight years of daily runs – July 31, 2017 Latest Postscenter_img Taylor Bigler MaceReporter at Mount Desert IslanderTaylor covers sports and maritimes for the Islander. As a native of Texas, she is an unapologetic Dallas Cowboys fan. [email protected] Town Hill Takeout serves up inventive tacos – August 18, 2017 Sea urchin subject of aging research – July 30, 2017last_img read more

Renault launches protest against Racing Point

first_img(BBC) – RENAULT have launched a protest against Racing Point, accusing them of not designing their own car.The Racing Point has been dubbed the ‘Pink Mercedes’ for its likeness to last year’s world title-winning car.Racing Point have admitted the similarity and that they have copied the 2019 Mercedes but say they have done so in compliance with the rules.The rules dictate that teams must design specific parts of the car themselves.Teams can buy certain parts from other teams but the rules dictate that so-called ‘listed parts’ must be designed by each individual team.The listed parts effectively amount to the car’s aerodynamic surfaces and its monocoque or survival cell.The rules dictate that each team “retains the exclusive right to use listed parts” as long as it competes in F1.Racing Point finished seventh in last year’s championship but their competitiveness has taken a step forward this year and their driver Sergio Perez was one of the fastest on track in Sunday’s Styrian Grand Prix.The Mexican charged up from 17th on the grid and was challenging the Red Bull of Alexander Albon for fourth before the two collided in the closing stages and Perez fell back to sixth at the finish.His team-mate Lance Stroll, whose father Lawrence Stroll owns the team, finished seventh.Racing Point use Mercedes engines and have a contract by which they buy their gearbox and other parts from the world champions, as well as lease time in their wind tunnel.last_img read more