Nobel physics laureate Roy Glauber dies at 93

first_imgRoy J. Glauber ’46, the pioneering theoretical physicist who received the Nobel Prize in 2005 and was one of the last living scientists to have been present for the dawn of the atomic age, died on Dec. 26, 2018. He was 93.The research that set Glauber on the path to a Nobel began with his interest in a groundbreaking 1956 experiment that confirmed a key concept of quantum physics — that light was both a particle and a wave — and laid the groundwork for the field. His landmark 1963 paper, “The Quantum Theory of Optical Coherence,” used quantum mechanical tools to transform science’s understanding of light, which previously had only been studied using classical techniques.“We really did not have a complete understanding of the quantum properties of light, and what Roy’s work laid out was a framework for thinking about that,” said Mikhail Lukin, the George Vasmer Leverett Professor of Physics and co-director of the Quantum Science and Engineering Initiative. “It allowed us to think about these types of questions quantitatively … so I would argue that his work very much laid the groundwork for the field of quantum science and technology that people are talking about right now.”Lukin said the theories outlined by Glauber opened the door for many scientific discoveries as well as next-generation technologies, including quantum computers and networks and the use of quantum cryptography, which relies on quantum mechanics to create impossible-to-crack codes.“Those ideas all grow out of this framework that he developed,” Lukin said. “Some people refer to these new developments as the second quantum revolution — the first was about understanding the laws of quantum mechanics. But in this second revolution … the idea is that now that we understand the quantum world and we can actually control it, let’s see what we can use it for. Can we build materials with properties which you design on demand? Can we build quantum computers? Can we build quantum networks where we can send information with absolute security from one side of the country to the other? These types of ideas very much depend on understanding where the classical world ends and the quantum world starts, and that’s where these ideas Roy pioneered and developed become absolutely critical.”Glauber graduated from the Bronx High School of Science and entered Harvard as a 16-year-old freshman, but left as a sophomore when he was recruited to join the Manhattan Project, where he worked with future Nobel-winning physicist Richard Feynman to calculate the critical mass of the first atomic bomb. Glauber was later present at the first tests of the bomb.Following World War II, he returned to Harvard to finish his undergraduate studies and later earn a Ph.D. After receiving his doctorate he was recruited to a position at the Institute for Advanced Study by Robert Oppenheimer, and worked there before returning to Harvard in 1952, where he spent the remainder of his career.Though he was known for taking his scientific work seriously, friends said Glauber wasn’t without a lighter side. For years, he was “keeper of the broom,” clearing the stage of paper airplanes thrown during the annual Ig Nobel Prize ceremony recognizing unusual or trivial scientific achievements.One of the few years Glauber missed the Ig Nobel ceremony was in 2005 — because he was in Stockholm collecting his real Nobel.“I think he took real glee in his role at the Ig Noble ceremony,” said Arthur Jaffe, the Landon T. Clay Professor of Mathematics and Theoretical Science. “He loved to describe with a smile his role as the janitor, sweeping the stage at the end of the performance.”In his spare time, Jaffe said, Glauber had great interest in classical music. He and his partner, Atholie Rosett, occasionally hosted events for one local performing group in their home.“People consider him a father of … a huge area of physics that has been very prolific in modern life,” Jaffe said. “He always had a very clear opinion about his evaluation of other scientists. Personally he remained modest; his character did not change at all after the Nobel Prize.”Irwin Shapiro, the Timken University Professor, knew Glauber for more than six decades, first as a student and later as his colleague. He credits Glauber with ensuring that he got his first job after receiving his Ph.D.“He was only four years older than I, and he called the head of the MIT Lincoln Laboratory who was thinking of hiring me and suggested, with no uncertainty, that he do so,” Shapiro said.Though both had grown up in New York, they had never met before Shapiro became Glauber’s first doctoral student.“One anecdote that made him laugh when I told him was, when I first became his advisee in 1952, I told my mother about it and mentioned Roy’s name as my adviser,” Shapiro recalled. “She somehow mentioned it to her younger sister, who piped up and said, ‘Oh, Felicia’s little boy, Roy!’ I don’t know how my aunt knew Roy’s mother, but somehow they had been friends.”Glauber is survived by his son, Jeffrey, a daughter, Valerie Glauber Fleishman; a sister, Jacqueline Gordon; Rosett, his companion of 13 years; and five grandchildren.last_img read more

Ploče, Pojezerje and Vrgorac signed an agreement: Polje Jezero as a micro-cycling tourist destination

first_imgLandscape and climatological features of this locality Polje Jezero are especially suitable for the development of trekking or gravel cycling. The area is extremely favorable as a destination for the so-called. agency cycling tourism or as one of the destinations of cyclists from other nearby destinations (Makarska Riviera, Dalmatian hinterland and the Neretva Valley). The agreement between the City of Vrgorac, the City of Ploče and the Municipality of Pojezerje o launched a joint project to develop the locality of Vrgorsko polje (Polje Jezero) into a sustainable micro-cycling destination called Polje Jezero. The project will result in designing, tracing and marking trekking (gravel) cycling routes on existing local roads and unclassified macadam roads in Vrgorsko polje, and branding the Polje Jezero cycling offer and creating a marketing and promotion plan, as well as developing services and accompanying offers for cyclot. Tourist valorization of this valuable agricultural area is possible only through sustainable forms of tourism, and cycling is one of the most sustainable segments of the tourism industry because cyclists are looking for preserved areas and authentic local cultures such as Polje Jezero, whose development is particularly suitable for creating added value to rural areas. .center_img Source: Facebook City of PločePhoto: Pixabay Due to the fact that cyclists use the local trade and catering offer to a greater extent than other tourists, often travel in groups or whole families, and cultural and natural attractions and thematic events are important to them, this joint project of three neighboring local governments only is a logical reflex to the requirements and needs of tourist branding of this area.last_img read more

Iran backs European plan to bolster nuclear deal

first_imgIranian President Hassan Rouhani attends the Eurasian Economic Council in Yerevan, Armenia on Oct. 1, 2019. TEHRAN –President Hassan Rouhani said Wednesday that Iran supports a plan by Europeancountries to bolster a nuclear deal that Tehran reached with the West in 2015and from which the United States withdrew last year. Rouhani saidthe plan included preventing Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons, securing itssupport for regional peace, lifting U.S. sanctions and the immediate resumptionof Iranian oil exports. center_img Speaking duringa weekly cabinet meeting, Rouhani said: “We agree with the general framework bythe Europeans.” France, Britain and Germany had urged Tehran to enter talksabout a new arrangement on the nuclear deal. (AP)last_img read more