Statoil gets green light to use Gina Krog FSO

first_imgNorway’s Statoil has received consent from the Petroleum Safety Authority (PSA) to use the Gina Krog FSO on the namesake field offshore Norway. The Gina Krog floating storage and offloading (FSO) is a converted shuttle tanker destined for use as a storage vessel on the Gina Krog oil and gas field, which is located 250 kilometers west of Stavanger and 30 kilometers north-west of the Sleipner A platform in the North Sea.The field has been developed using a fixed steel platform and a storage vessel (FSO) for oil, and started production in June 2017.The Gina Krog platform is tied in to Sleipner A and uses both processing capacity on the platform and existing pipelines for sending the gas to the market in Europe.Oil from the field is set to be transported by the Gina Krog FSO unit, which was converted from the former shuttle tanker Randgrid from the Heidrun field by Sembcorp Marine’s subsidiary Sembawang shipyard. The unit headed from Singapore to Norway in July.According to the latest AIS data, the FSO is currently moored in Randaberg at the northern end of Stavanger.Statoil is the operator of the Gina Krog field with an interest of 58.7 percent. French oil major Total recently sold its 15% stake in the field to KUFPEC which will upon completion of transaction have 30% interest. The remaining interest is held by PGNiG Upstream Norway (8%) and Aker BP (3.3%).The consent for the use of the Gina Krog FSO has been granted by the offshore safety regulator in accordance with Statoil’s application.Teekay owns and operates the FSO. No Acknowledgement of Compliance (AoC) will be issued, since this is a facility that will only be used for storage.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

CYF admits mistakes made in neglect case

first_imgRadio NZ News 1 July 2013Welfare agency Child, Youth and Family admits mistakes were made in its management of a couple found guilty of the serious neglect of their children. The 23-year-old woman and 25-year-old man, whose names are permanently suppressed to protect the four children, were sentenced in the District Court in Wellington on Monday. When police went to the Lower Hutt home in January this year they found the couple intoxicated and their children, then aged four, three, two and seven months, in a distressed state and in need of medical attention.….Child, Youth and Family’s general manager of operations Paula Attrill says the case highlights the need for better coordination of services for children. Ms Attrill says that at times social workers were overly optimistic about the parents’ progress and compliance with plans to address the children’s care. She says the focus was on getting the parents to make changes and at times the needs of the children did not receive the level of response that, in hindsight, should have occurred.http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/213370/cyf-admits-mistakes-made-in-neglect-caseChild neglect happening under CYF’s noseNZ City 1 July 2013…The department was notified on multiple occasions, over several years, about the parenting of the mother and father, who were sentenced on four charges of neglecting their children on Monday…Hutt Valley Inspector Mike Hill said the local community was appalled by the behaviour of the parents. “This was not an issue of poverty for this family, these parents simply prioritised alcohol, drugs and parties ahead of the needs of their children,” he said.http://home.nzcity.co.nz/news/article.aspx?id=169428&cat=1005&fm=newsmain%2Cnartslast_img read more