Peru Opens the First Military Base to Combat Narcotrafficking in VRAEM

first_imgBy Dialogo February 18, 2015 Colombian National Army scores victories against ELN, FARC Colombian National Army Soldiers dismantled a cocaine-producing laboratory operated by the National Liberation Army (ELN), and in another operation, seized a weapons cache belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the Army News Agency announced February 16. The FARC and the ELN are the nation’s largest guerrilla organizations. Both illegal groups engage in narcotrafficking to finance their terrorist activities. The Army did not immediately disclose whether Soldiers captured any suspects during the operations. Colombian National Army scores victories against ELN, FARC In the Department of Norte de Santander, Soldiers with the Vulcano Task Force seized about 200 gallons of coca syrup, 375 kilograms of chopped coca leaves – the main ingredient used to make cocaine – and 100 gallons of gasoline from a clandestine laboratory. And in the municipality of Rioblanco in the Department of Tolima, Troops with the Ground Combat No. 66 Unit of the Army’s Fifth Division found 300 ammunition cartridges for rifles belonging to the FARC’s Libardo Rojas Company. The FARC and the ELN are the nation’s largest guerrilla organizations. Both illegal groups engage in narcotrafficking to finance their terrorist activities. The Army did not immediately disclose whether Soldiers captured any suspects during the operations. About half of the cocaine produced illegally in Peru every year – about 450 tons in total – is flown to Bolivia by plane before being routed internationally. The government plans to build 12 bases this year in the VRAEM, the country’s largest cocaine-producing region encompassing four areas: Ayacucho, Cusco, Huancavelica, and Junín. Colombian National Army Soldiers dismantled a cocaine-producing laboratory operated by the National Liberation Army (ELN), and in another operation, seized a weapons cache belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the Army News Agency announced February 16. “We have enough Soldiers and officers to achieve territorial control in this area, where narcotrafficking is allied with terrorism,” Defense Minister Peter Cateriano Bellido said during the base’s opening ceremony. About half of the cocaine produced illegally in Peru every year – about 450 tons in total – is flown to Bolivia by plane before being routed internationally. The government plans to build 12 bases this year in the VRAEM, the country’s largest cocaine-producing region encompassing four areas: Ayacucho, Cusco, Huancavelica, and Junín. “We have enough Soldiers and officers to achieve territorial control in this area, where narcotrafficking is allied with terrorism,” Defense Minister Peter Cateriano Bellido said during the base’s opening ceremony. The Boca Anapati base has a heliport, which is important, since drug traffickers transport about 90 percent of all cocaine produced in the VRAEM by plane. It will also house Navy vessels that will patrol nearby waters. The Peruvian Armed Forces recently inaugurated the Boca Anapati base in the Province of Satipo in the Junín region to bolster the Military’s fight against narcotraffickers in the Apurimac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region. The Peruvian Armed Forces recently inaugurated the Boca Anapati base in the Province of Satipo in the Junín region to bolster the Military’s fight against narcotraffickers in the Apurimac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region. In the Department of Norte de Santander, Soldiers with the Vulcano Task Force seized about 200 gallons of coca syrup, 375 kilograms of chopped coca leaves – the main ingredient used to make cocaine – and 100 gallons of gasoline from a clandestine laboratory. And in the municipality of Rioblanco in the Department of Tolima, Troops with the Ground Combat No. 66 Unit of the Army’s Fifth Division found 300 ammunition cartridges for rifles belonging to the FARC’s Libardo Rojas Company. The Boca Anapati base has a heliport, which is important, since drug traffickers transport about 90 percent of all cocaine produced in the VRAEM by plane. It will also house Navy vessels that will patrol nearby waters. last_img read more

Annenberg, Unruh host inauguration viewing

first_imgStudents and faculty gathered in Wallis Annenberg Hall on Friday morning to watch Donald Trump be sworn in as the nation’s 45th president. The event, which analyzed the inauguration ceremony and featured live updates from Annenberg students in the Capitol, was co-hosted by the Annenberg Center on Communication Leadership & Policy and the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics. Unruh Director Bob Shrum and CCLP Director Geoffrey Cowan led a discussion with students, faculty and staff, as well as outside guests such as Probolsky Research Chief Operating Officer Justin Wallin, before and after the swearing-in. They discussed their predictions for Trump’s speech, the significance of the inaugural event and election as a whole and their impressions and analyses post-ceremony. Sarah Collins, a senior majoring in broadcast and digital journalism and political science — one of several Annenberg students who attended the inauguration in Washington, D.C. — was able to Skype into the event and share her experiences live. The discussion before the ceremony centered around Trump’s previous rhetoric, the importance of the tone he employs and what his election means for students.Shrum said that the most important thing to watch out for was the tone that Trump adopts in his speech, which could be a more accurate look at what he will actually be like as president. “I think one thing we have to be aware of as we get ready for this speech is the President-elect benefits from low expectations, and the last several weeks created an atmosphere in which people don’t necessarily expect a lot of this speech,” Shrum said. “I think this speech will be a really important clue to how he is actually going to behave as president.” Journalism professor Judy Muller said that she thinks it’s important to look at the protesters, as this is unlike any election she has seen before. “Everybody is always disappointed when their person doesn’t win,” Muller said. “It happened after Bush, it happened after Reagan, it happens every time [and] the losers go ‘oh, well’ and they shrug and move on. But this feels different. This feels like a resistance movement starting right off the bat.”    At the conclusion of the ceremony, both Shrum and Cowan offered their own insights. Shrum called Trump’s speech “startlingly angry.” “It was dark — it was more a campaign speech for his base than a traditional inaugural address,” Shrum said. “He mentioned ‘all Americans’ but in my view he didn’t say much of anything to the majority of Americans who didn’t vote for him. [It] is absolutely clear to me from his speech that he has a very definite program and he intends to pursue it.” Cowan added that it was interesting to him that Trump seemed to denounce everyone on the platform. “This wasn’t a Republican speech or a Democratic speech,” Cowan said. “It was something else.” Students contributed to the discussion and provided numerous viewpoints after being encouraged by Shrum and Cowan. Many students voiced concerns about what the next four years will be like, while a few defended Trump. Caroline Wohl, a freshman majoring in journalism who attended the event, said that it was difficult for her to know which sources to trust throughout the election cycle, and she appreciated being able to watch the ceremony without any commentary.“I couldn’t find a source that was unbiased, so coming here and being able to see it firsthand with my own eyes [and] not have any commentary during the actual event and talking about it after made me solidify my opinions and learn more about the whole subject,” Wohl said. Wohl said she thought students’ comments about Trump’s speech were very valid and that she values being at a school where students are able to speak their minds. She reiterated part of the discussion that journalists will continue to play a key role in politics. “As the professors were saying, journalists are so important right now because we don’t really know what’s going to happen,” Wohl said. “In the past there have been some attacks on journalists, especially in the past year, so I think now more than ever there’s a certain duty that we have to stay informed and report the truth.”last_img read more