BLOG: Combating Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemic a Top Priority for Governor Wolf (Round-up)

first_imgLike Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf BLOG: Combating Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemic a Top Priority for Governor Wolf (Round-up) May 03, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Round-Up,  Substance Use Disorder,  The Blog Governor Tom Wolf has hosted a series of roundtables across the state to address and discuss the current opioid epidemic in Pennsylvania. The roundtables were attended by state legislators, local officials, healthcare professionals, and law enforcement who shared their experiences and recommendations on how best to combat the crisis. Governor Wolf has announced that fighting opioid abuse is a top priority for his administration. The Governor is proud of the work that has been done by his administration so far, but stresses that there more work to do and he is reaching out to legislators, law enforcement, stakeholders, advocates, and local officials to solicit the best ideas to fight this crisis.“The magnitude of the addiction and overdose death epidemic in Pennsylvania is shocking: at least seven Pennsylvanians die every day from a drug overdose. With nearly 2,500 overdose deaths in Pennsylvania in 2014 and estimates that the 2015 total will be higher, a collaborative effort on the federal, state, and local levels is crucial in combating this crisis,” said the Governor.“These local roundtables give us the opportunity to discuss real solutions that will help Pennsylvania tackle this problem and ultimately save lives. It is my goal to make Pennsylvania an example for the rest of the nation for our work in this epidemic.”The Governor hopes that the bi-partisan effort of these roundtables is the beginning of a larger conversation regarding opioid abuse in Pennsylvania and will encourage state lawmakers and community leaders to work toward finding solution to ending this epidemic.Take a look at the additional coverage below:The Bradford Era: Wolf administration says heroin epidemic ‘a top priority’“Governor Wolf’s proposed 2016-17 budget provides more than $34 million to treat more than 11,250 new individuals with substance use disorder,” reads a release from Wolf’s office. “The Department of Human Services will provide 50 new Centers for Excellence for individuals with substance use disorder, providing medication-assisted treatment and appropriate wrap-around services, such as cognitive based therapies.”PA Homepage: Fighting Opioid Abuse[Early] education is on the mind of Governor Tom Wolf who met with some of those educators and law enforcement officials in Williamsport. Wolf wants kids to be talking about opioid abuse and heroin. Governor Wolf said, “Children are very potent disseminators of information and I think that suggestion the Superintendent made is a good one”.Daily Item: Doctor: Too few providers for expanded drug treatmentThe governor intends to use the $34 million to establish 50 Centers of Excellence to treat Medicaid recipients with opioid addictions — an estimated 11,250 additional addicted Pennsylvanians and 22,500 total…Wolf acknowledged the lack of available providers will be a challenge. “That’s a big debate within our administration,” Wolf said after the event. However, the governor stressed the proposal is but one method and that the state won’t be singular in its approach.Sun Gazette: Joining Forces“This is something that people take seriously, and it’s not a money thing,” [Governor Wolf] said. “No one wants to look at this problem and say it’s going to grow because we aren’t devoting adequate resources to it.” Wolf and state Sen. Gene Yaw, R-Loyalsock Township, agreed the opioid issue is a nonpartisan problem, and legislators, citizens and community leaders are all “concerned about what is happening throughout Pennsylvania,” Wolf said.Central Penn Business Journal: State roundtable highlights opioid epidemicEarlier this week Gov. Tom Wolf and state Senator Gene Yaw hosted a roundtable in Williamsport to discuss the state’s opioid epidemic. The goal of the discussion was to combat opioid abuse and heroin use epidemic. The governor is conducting roundtables statewideABC 27: Gov. Wolf talks about state’s opioid, heroin crisisWolf said taking care of the problem could save the state money. He said he has already taken steps that include proposing more money to fight the crisis in the next budget. “If we actually come up with a good effective answer, we’re going to save money,” Wolf told ABC27 News. “Think about how many dollars we’re going to save if we get back to $400 million rather than $2 billion in incarceration costs.”FOX 43: The cost of heroin addiction hits everyone in PennsylvaniaGovernor Wolf said the cost of heroin addiction to the community is not the only concern. “I think the ratios are pretty big, and so there might be some specific costs to programs that we want to put into place, but if we want to do it right, we’re going to be saving money and we’re saving lives,” Wolf said.WITF: Leaders plead for more treatment beds to help people addicted to opioidsLeaders at a roundtable with Governor Tom Wolf delivered a clear and consistent message: treatment programs aren’t keeping up with demand. On a day when President Barack Obama welcomed 10 “Champions of Change” to the White House in praise of their efforts to fight the opioid crisis, Governor Tom Wolf and others gathered for the roundtable in Lancaster.Lancaster Online: Pa. Gov. Wolf in Lancaster for Opioid RoundtableThe governor said the epidemic was one of the first — and biggest — problems he faced when he took office in January 2015. More people died of opioid overdoses in the United States last year than in car accidents; in Lancaster County, 80 people died of overdoses in 2015, and 52 died in car crashes. “What can we do?” Wolf asked a panel of more than 20 addiction counselors, service providers and elected officials Friday morning.Times Herald: Pa. Gov. Wolf visits Coatesville to discuss opioid crisis“We have an epidemic that is not focused in certain areas, it’s all over the state,” Wolf said. “Everyone is facing it.” According to statistics, nearly 2,500 people died of overdoses in Pennsylvania in 2014, Wolf noted, more than those killed in car accidents. “It destroys lives,” Wolf said. “It destroys the families.”WGAL: Wolf weighs in on PA heroin epidemic (video) By: Eryn Spangler, Press Assistantlast_img read more

Flood recovery process continues

first_imgAt this time, individuals with questions or concerns do not need to reach out to federal partners directly. Any questions should be directed to the Joint Information Center at 317-238-1784 or [email protected] Indianapolis, In. — Officials in Indiana counties are finalizing damage assessments and the State has requested a federal review, which is the next step in the process for requesting federal assistance. No federal assistance has been granted for Indiana residents. Below are steps citizens should take while the review process continues:Document all aspects of damage, as well as any cleanup process that occursKeep receipts, and document any funds received through insuranceIf assistance is needed in the meantime, reach out to 211 or the Red Cross at 888-684-1441Pay attention to local media about local resources availableThe Indiana Department of Homeland Security is also encouraging those interested Indiana residents to sign up for February Flood email updates through the agency. If assistance becomes available within the state, more information will be provided to that list. Individuals can sign up here. at http://bit.ly/FloodUpdateIN or find the link through the Disaster Recovery Resources page.last_img read more

Jonathan Hagman steps up as leading scorer in junior year

first_img Published on October 4, 2017 at 9:22 pm Contact Charlie: [email protected] | @charliedisturco Entering the season, Syracuse needed to replace 64 percent of its offensive production after losing three of its top four scorers. Kenny Lassiter, a forward expected to expand his role, transferred to La Salle.The Orange looked toward midfielder Jonathan Hagman. In a season filled with slow offensive starts and just one clean sheet defensively, Hagman has been a bright spot for a Syracuse (5-5-2, 0-3-1 Atlantic Coast) team that looks to win its first ACC game on Friday night against North Carolina State. The junior has already tied his goal total from a season ago with five, and in eight fewer games. Hagman’s often found offensive success with his ability to find open space in the penalty area and finish near the net.“We always know he’s going to be at the right place at the right moment,” midfielder Hugo Delhommelle said. “… He’s not a creative player and people won’t talk about him a lot. He does a lot of work behind the scene.”Unlike most players, Hagman’s goals have not come shooting off the dribble. He “outsmarts” opposing defenders, junior defender Kamal Miller said, finding open space and wriggling away from defenders with his off-ball. That intelligence off-ball is the main reason for his increase in productivity, Miller added.Down a goal against Virginia, Delhommelle took possession and pushed upfield. He passed to Johannes Pieles, who after a few touches fired a through ball that split two UVA defenders and found Hagman in stride inside the penalty area. With a defender draped over his back, Hagman one-touched and fired past the goalkeeper. Hagman’s 83rd-minute goal gave SU a tie, its only point in conference play to date.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textJosh Shub-Seltzer | Staff PhotographerHagman’s knack for finding open space provides his teammates with extra time to settle the ball and look toward the penalty area. When players try to cross the ball in front of the net, normally a forward is the lone player in the box, sophomore defender John Austin-Ricks said. But the team can count on Hagman to push upfield, find a spot and be on the receiving end on those crosses. All five of Hagman’s goals have been assisted.“You know (Hagman’s) going to be around no matter what,” junior forward Adnan Bakalovic said. “It’s just his ability to read the game and get into those areas to get easy tap ins.“His awareness of the game is world class.”Hagman’s goals often come in big-time moments for Syracuse. In the team’s season opener, he tied the game in the 80th minute before a Tajon Buchanan game winner. He added the second and third goals against Northwestern in what became a 3-1 win. He’s the only player with more than three goals and is tied for the team lead with 10 points.“From a productivity perspective,” SU head coach Ian McIntyre said, “he’s scored some important goals for us. … It becomes a natural habit of finding your way into the box at the right time.”In Hagman’s freshman season, he went scoreless in 11 games. The following year he scored four games in, but after back-to-back goals midway through the year, he was held scoreless in 11 of Syracuse’s last 12. This year, his longest goal-scoring drought has been three games.Syracuse’s offensive productivity is 0.15 goals per game less than the year prior. That’s without three of the top goal scorers from last season. A large factor in SU maintaining a similar mark comes from Hagman’s offensive prowess and ability to find the ball in front of the goal.“If you’re not fast,” Hagman said, “you have to figure out something else to do well on the pitch.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more