Turfgrass Updates

first_imgMore than 800 people braved the hot August temperatures for a firsthand glimpse of the latest research by University of Georgia scientists at the Turfgrass Research Field Day held Thursday, Aug. 4, on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia.“UGA serves as the research and education arm for the green industry in this state,” said Clint Waltz, UGA Cooperative Extension turfgrass specialist and one of the organizers of the field day event. “This field day keeps those in the green industry current and provides the continued education they need to remain profitable and able to provide the best quality products for golf courses, commercial lawns, homeowners’ lawns, parks, recreational sports fields and professional sports fields.” In the morning, green industry professionals rotated through a series of 12-minute talks by scientists from the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Topics included the latest research on turfgrass weed management, cultivar development and the application of pesticides while protecting pollinating insects.Self-guided tours in the afternoon included a demonstration on proper pesticide storage and handling, advice on the best fungicides for turfgrass disease control and sessions led by CAES turfgrass graduate students. “This field day attracts the top professionals in the green industry,” Waltz said. “Just like doctors and accountants attend conferences to say current in their fields, industry professionals attend our field day to keep current on best management practices and trends. They saw the latest and greatest in turfgrass science, from pest management, to environmental stewardship, to water management and conservation, to new turfgrasses on the horizon from our UGA breeders.”Professionals from Georgia and the Southeast also met several new UGA employees, including Assistant Dean for Extension and Agriculture and Natural Resources Program Leader Mark McCann and newly appointed UGA turfgrass physiologist David Jespersen.“We have a lot of new personnel who benefited from meeting turfgrass industry contacts, and it was exciting for everyone to see our new turfgrass research facility being constructed in the background,” Waltz said. “Two years ago, we talked about our new facility; this year, everyone saw it being built; and in two years, when the next field day is held, we’ll be in our new building.”For more information on turfgrass research at UGA, go to GeorgiaTurf.com.last_img read more

PhilHealth owes Bacolod hospital P134 million

first_imgGasataya said CLMMRH “badly” need the money to sustain the hospital’s daily expenses amid the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. He wrote a letter for this call dated July 27 to PhilHealth president and chief executive officer Ricardo Morales government.According to Gasataya, CLMMRH medical chief Julius Drilon told him that PhilHealth’s unpaid claims as of June 30 were supposedly intended for the procurement of supplies, like extraction kits, test kits, personal protective equipment, which will be used in the hospital’s molecular laboratory. “If (the reimbursements are) left unsettled, the operations of the hospital would be hampered as expenses for the laboratory consumables per month amount to approximately P7 million,” Gasataya said. BACOLOD City – Lone District Rep. Greg Gasataya is urging the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) to settle the P134,607,154.94 unpaid claims of Corazon Locsin Montelibano Memorial Regional Hospital (CLMMRH).center_img CLMMRH is the only tertiary government hospital in Negros Occidental. The CLMMRH has become the leading institution in the testing and treatment of COVID-19 patients in this province, Gatasaya pointed out./PNlast_img read more

Brittney Sykes is more than a mentor to freshman Gabby Cooper

first_imgTheir relationship started when Sykes was picked to host Cooper on her official visit last year. It wasn’t unusual, as Sykes had already hosted plenty of current SU player before, including the Day sisters, Davida Dale and Abby Grant.But something about her connection with Cooper was different with the two immediately bonding. They had a shared high school experience, Sykes said, of coming close to, but never winning a state championship. The mutual understanding helped make that initial visit a success.Cooper, who’s from a suburb of Chicago, then came to watch Syracuse play in last year’s Final Four in Indianapolis. There, Sykes told her that she needed to come to SU to help them make it back there this year.She stepped into the role vacated by Brianna Butler last year as a 3-point shooter who had a constant green light. But she struggled with her shot, hitting just 25 percent from deep on nearly 70 attempts through the first six games.As the season nears its conclusion, Cooper’s level of play has elevated. Up until the Notre Dame game, she was averaging eight points per game. Over the last six games she’s bumped that to 14.7.“She’s had some games where she’s missed a lot of shots,” head coach Quentin Hillsman said. “But she’s really stayed with it and she’s been very consistent in her effort.”In the season opener against Rhode Island, Cooper became the first freshman to start for Syracuse since Alexis Peterson started halfway through her freshman year in February 2014.Sykes also had experienced being thrust into a big role as a freshman. She knew the pressure of having to take on a large scoring role for her team, and of having to play at a level that isn’t asked from most freshman.Ally Moreo | Photo EditorExcept when she was a freshman, Sykes said she didn’t have somebody who had her experience, somebody to teach her how to navigate the newness with a need for results. She’s trying to be that person for Cooper, and in return is getting something too.“She doesn’t know this, but she taught me a lot this year that she won’t ever understand,” Sykes said. “She has helped me to grow as a person, she’s helped me to grow as a player.”Cooper and Sykes laughed when describing their relationship in the postgame press conference, especially when Cooper called it “weird.” Sykes said that she calls Cooper her kid.The two don’t have much time left together as teammates. At most, they’ll have five games. They could also have just one more if they don’t find a way around four-time defending national champions Connecticut.Sykes has prepped Cooper to take over her role next year after she’s gone. And in taking Cooper under her wing, she gained a new experience she hadn’t had in her basketball career before.“Haven’t really met a freshman like her before,” Sykes said. “It’s just one of those things where you see something in somebody and you just want to grab a hold of it.” Comments STORRS, Conn. — Brittney Sykes and Gabby Cooper have a tradition of touching foreheads before every game. The Syracuse starters stare at each other, getting into game mode by pumping each other up and offering words of encouragement.Usually, Sykes said, it’s just little words of encouragement and reminders to play strong defense. Before Saturday’s game against Iowa State, Sykes had something else to say.“Today I just told her,” Sykes said. “… ‘I need you to break the single-game record for 3s.’”The duo led eighth-seeded Syracuse (22-10, 11-5 Atlantic Coast) on Saturday in a dominating victory over ninth-seeded Iowa State (18-13, 9-9 Big 12). Cooper fulfilled Sykes request, setting the SU program record for 3s made in an NCAA Tournament game by knocking down eight, including five in the first quarter. Sykes followed up Cooper’s hot first quarter with 21 first-half points in the Orange’s 85-65 victory.The relationship between Sykes and Cooper — the former a fifth-year senior whose name is plastered in the SU record book, the latter a freshman who has started every game this year — goes past that of just a mentor and a mentee.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“She’s been amazing. She’s my best friend,” Cooper said. “She leads me in ways that I can’t even describe.” Published on March 18, 2017 at 8:01 pm Contact Tomer: [email protected] | @tomer_langercenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Stampede kills 15 Congolese fans

first_imgThe end of the domestic league season was marred by tragedy when a wall and a gate collapsed at the Tata Raphael Stadium in KinshasaThe head of African football has offered his condolences to the families of 15 fans killed on Sunday amid a stampede during AS Vita’s season-ending match against TP Mazembe in the Democratic Republic of Congo.Confederation of African Football (CAF) president Issa Hayatou expressed the continental governing body’s “deep sadness” at the events at the Tata Raphael Stadium in Kinshasa and has called upon the Congolese football federation to give a full report on the incident.”I would like to express my deepest sympathy on hearing of the untimely deaths of at least 15 people during the match of AS Vita and TP Mazembe,” Hayatou told CAFOnline. “Personally, and on behalf of the members of the African football community, I should be grateful if you could extend our deepest condolences to their families, friends and loved ones.”Further, we wish those that have been reported injured and receiving medical assistance a full recovery.” The stampede took place during injury-time with Mazembe leading 1-0, with a wall and gate collapsing under the weight of bodies. Fans of AS Vita had earlier launched objects onto the field of play, with police responding by releasing tear gas into the stands.The governor of Kinshasa has moved quickly to set up a commission looking into the tragedy, but Hayatou has taken the opportunity to speak of Caf’s resistance to violence in the game.”I wish to re-emphasise that any acts of violence have no place in football. They must be condemned in the strongest possible terms and I urge the Fecofa (Congolese FA) and authorities in the DRC to thoroughly investigate this matter.”last_img read more