Press release: Local COVID alert level update for South Yorkshire

first_img Barnsley Doncaster Rotherham the City of Sheffield people must not socialise with anybody they do not live with, or have formed a support bubble with, in any indoor setting or in any private garden or at most outdoor hospitality venues and ticketed events people must not socialise in a group of more than 6 in an outdoor public space such as a park or beach, the countryside, a public garden or a sports venue all pubs and bars must close, unless they are serving substantial meals people should try to avoid travelling outside the very high alert level or entering a very high alert level area, other than for work, education or for caring responsibilities or to travel through as part of a longer journey residents should avoid staying overnight in another part of the UK, and others should avoid staying overnight in the very high alert area I would like to thank the Mayor of the Sheffield City Region Dan Jarvis and the leaders of the local councils of South Yorkshire for the constructive discussions we have had about how to get the virus under control in the region. Given rates are amongst the highest in the country I am pleased that we were able to reach an agreement that ensures swift action is taken in accordance with the public health advice. I fully recognise the huge impact this will have on communities in the area and the sacrifices people will be making. That’s why we have agreed an extensive package of support for local people, businesses and councils. The restrictions we have agreed together will only be in place for as long as they are absolutely necessary. They will be reviewed jointly in 28 days’ time. The government is totally committed to working with local leaders as we tackle this challenge, for the benefit of all the people of South Yorkshire. I’m very grateful to the local leadership in South Yorkshire who have worked together closely, cross party, on the need for additional measures to protect lives and livelihoods. A failure to act now would only lead to tougher and longer lasting restrictions later. I understand the sacrifice people in South Yorkshire have already made and the enormous impact further measures will have on people’s lives. That is why we are also providing support to businesses and contact tracing activity across South Yorkshire. Now is the time for us all to work together to get this virus under control. The rate of COVID-19 infections is rising rapidly across the UK.The case rate in England stood at 169 people per 100,000 from 9 October to 15 October, up from 100 people per 100,000 for the week 25 September to 1 October. Cases are not evenly spread, with infection rates rising more rapidly in some areas than others.In South Yorkshire rates are among the highest in the country and continuing to rise rapidly with case rates ranging from 285 people per 100,000 in Doncaster up to 402 people per 100,000 in Sheffield.Although originally focused on the younger population, we are seeing rises in the older population now as well. In order to reduce these numbers and ensure that the NHS isn’t overwhelmed and has capacity to treat other conditions we need to act now.To support the local authority during this period, the government will be providing a financial support package. In addition to the £ 1 billion of funding the Prime Minister set out on Monday 12 October. This includes additional funding of £11.2 million for local enforcement and contact tracing activity.Additional financial support will also be provided for local companies – recognising the additional strain these measures will place on businesses.Local COVID alert level very high will take effect across all parts of South Yorkshire. It will cover: Following close discussions with local leaders, South Yorkshire will move from local COVID alert level high to very high from 00.01 on Saturday 24 October. This means that new measures will come into place including: Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said: Sheffield: 402 Barnsley: 367 Rotherham: 341 Doncaster: 285 In addition, following discussions with local leaders it was agreed that from 00.01 on Saturday 24 October additional closures will include: Local Government Secretary Robert Jenrick said: All available data for the areas that will move to local COVID alert level very high at 00.01 on Saturday 24 October have been assessed by the government, including the Health and Social Care Secretary, NHS Test and Trace including the Joint Biosecurity Centre (JBC), Public Health England (PHE), the Chief Medical Officer and the Cabinet Office. Data assessed includes incidence, test positivity and the growth rate of the virus.It is essential that these outbreaks are contained to protect lives and our NHS, and prevent greater economic damage in the future. We face a new challenge as we head into the winter, and we know that even mild cases of COVID-19 can have devastating consequences for people in all age groups, along with the risk of Long COVID.Our strategy is to suppress the virus while supporting the economy, education and the NHS, until an effective vaccine is widely available. Local action is at the centre of our response, and engagement with local authorities is, and will continue to be, a key part of this process.Background informationThe 7-day case rates per 100,000 for South Yorkshire are as follows: betting shops adult gaming centres casinos soft play centres On 12 October, the government introduced a new, simplified framework for local interventions based around 3 new local COVID alert levels.The postcode checker shows which alert level applies in each area.The NHS COVID-19 app will also direct people to this information.We have provided £3.7 billion of funding to local authorities in England to respond to pressures in all their services.The Prime Minister also announced on Monday 12 October additional COVID funding of around £1billion which will provide Local Authorities with additional money to protect vital services. The Government will set out further information in due course on how this new funding will be allocated.See guidance on each local COVID alert level.Throughout the pandemic, the government has listened carefully to the views of the scientific community, in particular the information from the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) and its sub-groups when taking decisions on the best way to tackle the pandemic.last_img read more

Bootsy Collins Explains How LSD Played A Role In His Split With James Brown’s Band

first_imgBootsy Collins is one of the more colorful personalities in the history of funk. Collins is known for his star-shaped sunglasses (and bass) and glittery stage outfits, in addition to playing in bands like Parliament-Funkadelic and alongside George Clinton. Some fans, however, may not know that Bootsy and his brother, Phelps “Catfish” Collins, were once hired by James Brown to be his new backing back beginning in 1970. The professional relationship lasted for less than a year, although part of Collins’ departure was more about the wonders of psychedelic drugs than the actual music itself.In a 2017 interview with British publication The Guardian, Collins explained that LSD, the same driving force behind some of the early evolution of the Grateful Dead, caused some friction between the funk bassist and the “Godfather of Soul.”“LSD was a big part of why I left James Brown’s band,” Collins admits. “I promised myself I’d never do it during a show, but we had a father-son relationship, and he pestered me so much not to do it that one day I just did. My bass turned into a snake and I can’t even remember playing. After, he called me in the back room, as he always did, and was explaining how terrible I was – even when I wasn’t taking LSD. I laughed so hard I was on the floor. To him, that was very disrespectful. He had his bodyguard throw me out.”Related: George Clinton & Parliament-Funkadelic Join Red Hot Chili Peppers In BrisbaneCollins also went on to share some of the wild stories from his years in Parliament-Funkadelic, adding, “My time in Funkadelic was about creativity. I was 21 and there were no rules. The best time was when we crossed the border to Canada in cars filled with smoke – George [Clinton] had rented a big place on a lake and there were about 20 of us and we recorded ‘America Eats Its Young.’”[H/T – The Guardian]last_img read more

Courts brace for funding shift

first_imgCourts brace for funding shift Courts brace for funding shift Amy K. Brown Assistant Editor July 1, 2004, may seem like a long way off, but for Florida State Courts Administrator Rob Lubitz, the day is rapidly approaching.Lubitz told members of the Bar’s Family Law Section Executive Council in September that everyone involved in the courts should be aware that this day — the official date the state will assume the lion’s share of funding for Florida’s state court system — is looming on the horizon.“Chief Justice [Harry Lee] Anstead has called this ‘the major challenge to the courts of our time,’ and I don’t think that’s an understatement,” Lubitz said. “This move to state assumption of funding of the court system really has the potential to change how we do business in the courts and really put in jeopardy many of the innovative, progressive things this state has done.”Currently, more than half of the funding for the court system comes from the counties, Lubitz said, but it varies from circuit to circuit.In larger areas like Dade County, it’s a much higher percentage, while in smaller counties, the state already picks up the majority of the tab, he said. However, the courts currently operate on less than 1 percent of the state budget — 0.58 percent, to be exact.“Most of the new programs, most of the innovative programs are funded by the counties,” he said.And those programs face the greatest risk of getting short-changed in the funding process, he said.In 1998, a constitutional amendment known as “Revision 7” was passed that said the state will assume responsibility for the essential elements of the court system. Follow-up legislation was passed in 2000 that defined from a legislative perspective what constituted an essential element — judges and essential staff, juror compensation, reasonable court reporting, services for the disabled, construction of facilities for the Supreme Court and appellate courts, and foreign language interpreters.“If you look at that as the essential elements of the court system, that’s a pretty bare bones court system,” Lubitz said. “If that’s all we get, the court system will look very different July 1, 2004, when this is implemented.”In response, the Supreme Court formed the Trial Court Budget Committee and tasked the 21 members, including representatives from each of the circuits, with formulating a plan to deal with Revision 7. Their first move was to take inventory of all the functions of the courts that were funded by the counties, which they separated into four categories.“The Trial Court Budget Committee feels that we have a great court system, and pretty much everything we have now needs to be funded in some way or another,” Lubitz said. “Everything’s important. . . and ultimately, we want to fund everything. The reality is that might not be the case. You have to set some priorities.“The first priority in the system in the constitution was to determine what the central element in the court system ought to be — what legally and constitutionally we absolutely have to have in order to run a court system. Without funding in these areas, our court system would ostensibly have to shut down. This is the minimum.”The TCBC set out 10 things they felt were absolutely essential: judges and judicial assistants, court administration, case management, court reporting, court interpreting, mediation and alternative dispute resolution, legal aid and legal services to the court, psychological evaluations and expert witnesses ordered by the court, masters/hearing officers, and auxiliary aids and services.“Those are the core things we call essential,” he said. “I think you’ll recognize that a lot of those are specifically related to the work in family court. They have to continue to be in the state court budget and. . . that’s really where we would make our first stand to the legislature that these things have to be done.”The second category the TCBC addressed was “due process elements” — areas not defined as constitutional elements, but areas that are necessary. These include conflict counsel and psychological evaluations ordered by state attorneys and public defenders.“That leaves pretty much everything else,” Lubitz said. “Everything else, the TCBC defined as integrated functions. These are functions that we believe are necessary for providing a modern, responsive, efficient court system, but they don’t rise to the level of essential.”Lubitz said there are four options for dealing with the integrated functions: advocate for them to continue in the court budget; try to move them to another area of the state budget; make them local requirements; or make them local options.The third option — local requirements — is what Lubitz called “the crux of the matter.” Some have argued that everything nonessential can be a requirement, but, constitutionally, local requirements are those functions unique to a particular circuit or locality that meet local demands.The last category of court functions, local obligations, encompasses those few functions counties will be required to maintain funding for — local facilities, technology, and information systems. Uphill Battle At a recent meeting of district court judges, Senate President-designate Jim King, R-Jacksonville, and Rep. Dudley Goodlette, R-Naples, on behalf of House Speaker-elect Johnnie Byrd, R-Plant City, gave their perspectives on how the legislature plans to face Revision 7.Sen. King “gave a little bit of a bleak message,” Lubitz said. “Sen. King said that he felt he was facing, in his terms, approximately a $4 billion budget deficit. He indicated that, although he would like to be able to give the courts everything that they want, likely, they’d only be able to fund the essential elements from a state perspective, and that would be a very literal definition of what are essential elements.“He indicated there would probably be lost positions and the hope was that the courts wouldn’t be seriously short-sheeted.”But, Lubitz added, some better news came from Rep. Goodlette.“He basically said we have a great court system, and we don’t want to do anything that harms the court system. We want to continue it,” Lubitz said. “He implied that they were really going to lean on the counties to continue funding, or take funds from the counties to continue funding, the court system.” Getting the Message Out One of the most important duties of the courts this year and next is to formulate and implement a communications and education plan to educate legislators about the implications of Revision 7, Lubitz said. Earlier this year, Chief Justice Anstead formed a communications advisory group made up of court and Bar leaders, including Bar President Tod Aronovitz, former President Terry Russell, and President-elect Miles McGrane, and led by Ninth Circuit Chief Judge Belvin Perry, to formulate just such a plan.On September 22 (after this News went to press), in conjunction with a business meeting of the state’s chief judges at the College of Advanced Judicial Studies in St. Petersburg Beach, Perry and Chief Justice Anstead were set to task the chief judges to form Revision 7 communications committees in their home circuits.“The concept of these committees is to bring together key members of the Bar and the community, key business leaders, key criminal justice people, whoever they identify are the real decisionmakers, the movers and shakers in the community, to talk about the importance of the court system,” Lubitz said. “The idea is to energize these people to go out and talk to the legislators about what the courts do in the community.”Evan Marks, treasurer of the Family Law Section Executive Council, asked what the section could do to protect services specific to the family court system.“While I applaud the effort on a global scale to try to get funded, our section and the people we represent don’t want to lose their services,” he said. “I imagine there are similar people in the criminal section, in the probate section, in other sections, that are saying, ‘How do we hold on to our services?’”Lubitz answered that individual advocacy for specific services with the legislature could be effective, but the entire system should be the priority.“I think that if each of the various groups fights for just their piece, then I think we’re in trouble,” he added. “If we get case management in the family area, but we don’t have court administration. . . then the system won’t work. I think if we break into various groups, each clawing for their own piece of it, that could unravel the system.”Bar President Aronovitz, who attended the executive council meeting to make a Dignity in Law presentation, added, “This is such a critically important issue.. . . We need to get excited about this.. . . “We need to get the message out to the legislature that banks aren’t going to be able to go to court to prosecute foreclosures. Landlord/tenant evictions aren’t going to take place. The criminal court justice system is going to really be hindered in its ability to prosecute cases. It’s a very, very frustrating situation.“We all know in our communities members of the House and Senate. It’s really important now, more than ever, that you pick up the phone and call somebody you know. Go have a cup of coffee with them. Explain to them your practice and how you practice law, how you move your cases through the family courts and how our judicial system works, and how vitally important what Rob is talking about is.“If we don’t do it, nobody’s going to do it.” October 1, 2002 Assistant Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

Best Practices: Community involvement with Denver Community Credit Union

first_imgAs financial institutions look to better-implement their brand footprint in the communities they serve, increasing importance is placed on community involvement. This isn’t old-school community involvement where you could get away with having a table or booth at an event with a couple of passive employees handing out flyers. Community involvement that works well in 2017 is defined much more by proactive, deeper-level meaningful interaction between bank or credit union staff and the populations they serve.A terrific example of this comes from Denver Community Credit Union (Denver, CO; $315 million assets; 25,000 members). In its quest for community involvement, Denver Community focuses on a number of key areas including financial education and a heightened awareness of the brand.“Since Denver Community implemented a financial education program in 2005, it has reached tens of thousands of people with the message of financial empowerment,” said Helen Gibson, VP of Marketing and Education. “In 2016, 2,395 people attended classes at the credit union, listened to podcasts, or participated in financial coaching.” continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

NextGen Know-How: A framework for better, shorter meetings

first_img continue reading » I work with many organizations, and a common complaint from leaders is that they have to attend too many meetings. They often say that they can’t get their real work done because there is no space in the day to actually think and execute. But what if you could make your meetings much more effective and productive while also reducing the number of unnecessary and ineffective meetings? There is a way!Regular meetings (whether in person or by conference call) can be very effective for reinforcing goals, keeping employees on track, asking questions and removing obstacles. They’re also a great opportunity to coach your team. In my experience, leaders who don’t have a regular forum to discuss the progress of goals quickly lose track of what their team is doing. Employees can become disconnected, overwhelmed and confused.However, not all meetings are useful, and poor planning, poor facilitation and lack of follow-up cause most meetings to be a waste of time. To make the most of meetings, you need to have clarity around what you want to accomplish.One of the most important responsibilities of a leader is to create clarity. Your job is to communicate the larger purpose and goals of the organization in a way that clearly connects your team to that vision. Clarity allows people to take action. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

The state is selling the island of Smokvica, the hotel Hrvatska in Baška voda, the Perna Tourist Board in Orebić and the Uvala Slana camp

first_img Lease of the tourist resort Perna with the hotel Komodor and the camp Orebić Today, the Ministry of State Property announced a public call for bids for the lease and purchase of real estate owned by the Republic of Croatia. The deadline for submission of bids is June 20, 2018 by 14.00:XNUMX p.m. These are a public call for the lease of real estate on the island of Smokvica in Šibenik-Knin County, the purchase of the Hotel Hrvatska in Baška Voda, the lease of the tourist resort Perna with Hotel Komodor and Camp Orebić and the lease of Camp Uvala Slana with Apart Hotel Club Vala in Selce.The most attractive is the island of Smokvica, which is leased for 30 years, and the annual price is 4 million and 910 thousand kuna. The Perna tourist resort with the Komodor hotel and the Orebić camp is also leased for five years, with a starting price of 8 million and 40 thousand kuna. Camp Uvala Slana with the hotel Club Vala is also leased at a price of 943 thousand kuna per year. For sale is Hotel Hrvatska in Baška Voda with a starting price of 42 million 392 thousand and 625 kuna.Public invitation for submission of bids for lease and purchase of real estate owned by the Republic of Croatia 4/18  Purchase of hotel Hrvatska in Baška voda  Lease of real estate on the island of Smokvica in Šibenik-Knin County  Lease of the Uvala Slana camp with the Club Vala apart hotel in Selcelast_img read more

PREMIUMMusic from graveyard annoys Depok residents

first_imgLOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Facebook Linkedin Google Topics : Log in with your social account For almost a year, residents of community unit (RW) 18 of Pancoran Mas district, Depok, have been annoyed by loud dangdut music blasting from a cemetery located on Jl. Swadaya, a street in neighborhood unit (RT) 5. The residents…center_img Heli, a 30-year-old resident of Pancoran Mas, Depok, West Java, recalled attending a tahlilan (prayer gathering) last Saturday afternoon after one of his neighbors passed away and had just been buried earlier that morning at a cemetery located right in front of his house. Forgot Password ? The tahlilan went fine as attendees fervently prayed while some wiped away tears as they mourned their loss. However, the mournful atmosphere swiftly changed as loud dangdut music suddenly blared from the middle of the cemetery.  “I couldn’t focus on praying as the sound was very disturbing,” Heli told The Jakarta Post on Friday. graveyard music cemetery dangdut scavenger street-musician Depok West-Javalast_img read more

Real Madrid set £44m asking price for Arsenal to seal Dani Ceballos transfer

first_imgCeballos played his way back into Arteta’s plans (Picture: Getty)That salary reduction is set to last for the next 12 months and the Gunners have even shelved contract renewal talks with Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Mesut Ozil due to the ongoing health crisis.Ceballos is likely to have his loan deal extended if the Premier League are permitted to finish the 2019/20 season this summer.The Spaniard spoke out about his future this week and revealed he still expects to be given a chance to prove himself at Real.‘I haven’t spoken to Zidane since I left,’ Ceballos told Movistar. More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘It has to be difficult to have a dressing room with so many players. I don’t think Zidane talks to the loan players. ‘Hopefully [I will play for Real Madrid again]. I now have a contract with Arsenal. ‘At the moment in Madrid it is difficult to play with the players that are there. ‘Now I am focused on being important at a club.’MORE: Jack Wilshere explains why Arsenal never won Premier League with Mesut Ozil and Alexis SanchezMORE: Dani Ceballos hoping for Real Madrid return after Arsenal loan but has had no contact with Zinedine ZidaneFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page. Comment Real Madrid set £44m asking price for Arsenal to seal Dani Ceballos transfer Advertisement Coral BarryTuesday 28 Apr 2020 11:03 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link345Shares Advertisement Ceballos is on loan at Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Arsenal will have to pay £44million to seal the permanent transfer of Dani Ceballos, according to reports in Spain.Real Madrid expect the midfielder to return to the club at the end of his loan spell and have not ruled out the possibility of promoting Ceballos to the first-team.Eager to keep hold of his place in the Spain national side, Ceballos has prioritised regular football ahead of next season and managed to win the trust of Mikel Arteta after initially falling down the pecking order at the Emirates.Read the latest updates: Coronavirus news liveADVERTISEMENTArsenal are keen to sign Ceballos permanently or bring him back to the club on another season-long loan following his performances this term.AdvertisementAdvertisementAS claim Real are only prepared to sell the 23-year-old if a club offers £44m (€50m) for Ceballos.Due the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, such a bid would be difficult for Real to turn down.Arsenal, however, are not expected to have a big transfer kitty to spend this summer after asking their first-team players and Arteta to take a 12.5 per cent pay cut.last_img read more

BLOG: Combating Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemic a Top Priority for Governor Wolf (Round-up)

first_imgLike Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf BLOG: Combating Pennsylvania’s Opioid Epidemic a Top Priority for Governor Wolf (Round-up) May 03, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Round-Up,  Substance Use Disorder,  The Blog Governor Tom Wolf has hosted a series of roundtables across the state to address and discuss the current opioid epidemic in Pennsylvania. The roundtables were attended by state legislators, local officials, healthcare professionals, and law enforcement who shared their experiences and recommendations on how best to combat the crisis. Governor Wolf has announced that fighting opioid abuse is a top priority for his administration. The Governor is proud of the work that has been done by his administration so far, but stresses that there more work to do and he is reaching out to legislators, law enforcement, stakeholders, advocates, and local officials to solicit the best ideas to fight this crisis.“The magnitude of the addiction and overdose death epidemic in Pennsylvania is shocking: at least seven Pennsylvanians die every day from a drug overdose. With nearly 2,500 overdose deaths in Pennsylvania in 2014 and estimates that the 2015 total will be higher, a collaborative effort on the federal, state, and local levels is crucial in combating this crisis,” said the Governor.“These local roundtables give us the opportunity to discuss real solutions that will help Pennsylvania tackle this problem and ultimately save lives. It is my goal to make Pennsylvania an example for the rest of the nation for our work in this epidemic.”The Governor hopes that the bi-partisan effort of these roundtables is the beginning of a larger conversation regarding opioid abuse in Pennsylvania and will encourage state lawmakers and community leaders to work toward finding solution to ending this epidemic.Take a look at the additional coverage below:The Bradford Era: Wolf administration says heroin epidemic ‘a top priority’“Governor Wolf’s proposed 2016-17 budget provides more than $34 million to treat more than 11,250 new individuals with substance use disorder,” reads a release from Wolf’s office. “The Department of Human Services will provide 50 new Centers for Excellence for individuals with substance use disorder, providing medication-assisted treatment and appropriate wrap-around services, such as cognitive based therapies.”PA Homepage: Fighting Opioid Abuse[Early] education is on the mind of Governor Tom Wolf who met with some of those educators and law enforcement officials in Williamsport. Wolf wants kids to be talking about opioid abuse and heroin. Governor Wolf said, “Children are very potent disseminators of information and I think that suggestion the Superintendent made is a good one”.Daily Item: Doctor: Too few providers for expanded drug treatmentThe governor intends to use the $34 million to establish 50 Centers of Excellence to treat Medicaid recipients with opioid addictions — an estimated 11,250 additional addicted Pennsylvanians and 22,500 total…Wolf acknowledged the lack of available providers will be a challenge. “That’s a big debate within our administration,” Wolf said after the event. However, the governor stressed the proposal is but one method and that the state won’t be singular in its approach.Sun Gazette: Joining Forces“This is something that people take seriously, and it’s not a money thing,” [Governor Wolf] said. “No one wants to look at this problem and say it’s going to grow because we aren’t devoting adequate resources to it.” Wolf and state Sen. Gene Yaw, R-Loyalsock Township, agreed the opioid issue is a nonpartisan problem, and legislators, citizens and community leaders are all “concerned about what is happening throughout Pennsylvania,” Wolf said.Central Penn Business Journal: State roundtable highlights opioid epidemicEarlier this week Gov. Tom Wolf and state Senator Gene Yaw hosted a roundtable in Williamsport to discuss the state’s opioid epidemic. The goal of the discussion was to combat opioid abuse and heroin use epidemic. The governor is conducting roundtables statewideABC 27: Gov. Wolf talks about state’s opioid, heroin crisisWolf said taking care of the problem could save the state money. He said he has already taken steps that include proposing more money to fight the crisis in the next budget. “If we actually come up with a good effective answer, we’re going to save money,” Wolf told ABC27 News. “Think about how many dollars we’re going to save if we get back to $400 million rather than $2 billion in incarceration costs.”FOX 43: The cost of heroin addiction hits everyone in PennsylvaniaGovernor Wolf said the cost of heroin addiction to the community is not the only concern. “I think the ratios are pretty big, and so there might be some specific costs to programs that we want to put into place, but if we want to do it right, we’re going to be saving money and we’re saving lives,” Wolf said.WITF: Leaders plead for more treatment beds to help people addicted to opioidsLeaders at a roundtable with Governor Tom Wolf delivered a clear and consistent message: treatment programs aren’t keeping up with demand. On a day when President Barack Obama welcomed 10 “Champions of Change” to the White House in praise of their efforts to fight the opioid crisis, Governor Tom Wolf and others gathered for the roundtable in Lancaster.Lancaster Online: Pa. Gov. Wolf in Lancaster for Opioid RoundtableThe governor said the epidemic was one of the first — and biggest — problems he faced when he took office in January 2015. More people died of opioid overdoses in the United States last year than in car accidents; in Lancaster County, 80 people died of overdoses in 2015, and 52 died in car crashes. “What can we do?” Wolf asked a panel of more than 20 addiction counselors, service providers and elected officials Friday morning.Times Herald: Pa. Gov. Wolf visits Coatesville to discuss opioid crisis“We have an epidemic that is not focused in certain areas, it’s all over the state,” Wolf said. “Everyone is facing it.” According to statistics, nearly 2,500 people died of overdoses in Pennsylvania in 2014, Wolf noted, more than those killed in car accidents. “It destroys lives,” Wolf said. “It destroys the families.”WGAL: Wolf weighs in on PA heroin epidemic (video) By: Eryn Spangler, Press Assistantlast_img read more

8 Street founder lists Feng Shui house

first_imgMr Wu said another key design focus was ensuring that all four bedrooms had ensuites, and that an open floor plan and high ceilings were featured thought the Sunnybank build.He said he had already had “a fair bit of interest” from Asian buyers. “I am now working on another project in Holland Park West, but that’s being targeted at both western and Asian buyers,” he said.“It will have some of the same design concepts but with more of a western feel.”The Sunnybank property is being marketed by Owen Chen and John Heng of Place Sunnybank. 7 ALDERSHOT ST SUNNYBANKBRISBANE entrepreneur David Wu, who founded the hugely popular 8 Street, is selling his Sunnybank investment property.8 Street is an Asian hawkers market-style food precinct which now has four locations in Australia – Westfield Garden City, Mount Ommaney, Harbour Town on the Gold Coast and Docklands in Melbourne. MORE NEWS: Renewed push to sell fitness queen Ashy Bines’ Gold Coast home Richlister reveals the best property advice he was ever given Mr Wu said property development was “my hobby”.He said he targeted the southside as he could see a need for housing that suited the Asian buyer, focusing his design concepts on open plan layouts and Feng Shui.“I have done some renovations on investment properties but this is my first new build,” he said.“Although I did build our family home in Camp Hill.”center_img Mr Wu said he wanted the Sunnybank house to be a modern build with unique features and have a focus on using all spaces. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus10 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market10 hours agoHe said Feng Shui was important consideration for Asian buyers.Realestate.com.au notes that Feng Shui is all about the balance of energies, also known as Qi, with a focus on “positive energy” to ensure health and good fortune. 8 Street founder David Wu (right) in Surfers ParadiseMr Wu confirmed they were also investigating options to open a new precinct in the Brisbane CBD.But it is not just food and hospitality that keeps Mr Wu busy, with another of his companies Wu Property XT Pty Ltd buying up a number of investment opportunities on Brisbane’s southside and the northern Gold Coast. Property records show that Wu Property XT Pty Ltd bought a large vacant block of land at Sunnybank in 2018, and split the block in to three parcels.Two of those blocks were sold off, with one at 7 Aldershot Street now home to a brand-new, modern build now listed for offers over $1.29 million. Neale Whitaker rescues home stuck in reno limbolast_img read more