Acoustic sounding of the atmospheric boundary layer at Halley, Antarctica

first_imgThe records obtained from a monostatic acoustic sounder run at Halley, Antarctica, have been analysed with the use of data from instruments on a 32 m mast and from radiosonde ascents. Echoes representing ground-based layers, waves, and shallow gravity currents are discussed. The spiky ground-based echo is related to a westerly surface wind, whilst a layered wavy flow is related to surface easterlies. Such relationships are consistent with the sloped inversion wind regime at Halley.last_img

An avionics platform for multi-instrument survey navigation

first_imgThe British Antarctic Survey regularly conducts airborne surveys with Twin Otter aircraft equipped with a variety of instruments. Each instrument captures its specific navigation requirements in a dedicated cockpit display that is unique and incompatible with that of other instruments. This creates unwanted logistical problems and training requirements, and necessitates extra air safety certification. In this paper we describe a new avionics display that is sufficiently flexible to capture the requirements of all of our instruments, as well as all of the preferences of our pilots. This Airborne Survey Navigation Device (ASCEND) dynamically routes aircraft within the constraints of the survey and features flexible and intuitive planning and navigation interfaces. ASCEND has been tested and compared to the instrument specific displays and is preferred, both for its ease of use and also for the effective accuracy of the pilot following a survey line.last_img read more

Nursing Adjunct Faculty

first_imgDescriptionOlympic College is continuously seeking qualified part time nursingfaculty to begin teaching each quarter.The Nursing Faculty at Olympic College are a motivated, caring,enthusiastic and unique team of individuals who continually strivefor personal and professional excellence. Our goal is to provide anenvironment that fosters growth and maximizes the potential ofindividual students, empowering them to contribute to the healthand wellness of the greater community.The base salary for Nursing Faculty will now include anadditional 26.5% pay adjustment to meet industrystandards.Click the “How to Apply” button for more information.last_img read more

Influential Jazz Pianist Mose Allison Has Passed Away At Age 89

first_imgWe’re sad to report that the beloved jazz and blues pianist Mose Allison has passed away today, at the age of 89. A force of smooth jazz shuffles since the 1950’s, Allison’s death was confirmed by his daughter, singer/songwriter Amy Allison.Mose Allison is perhaps best known for his smooth vocal approach and doo-wop influenced piano playing. He collaborated with many jazz greats of his day, including Stan Getz and Gerry Mulligan, but gained most fame from his performances as a trio. His casual style was best suited in an intimate setting, mixeing conversation with the crowd.While Allison’s music may not be popular among today’s listeners, his sound came at a pivotal time in rock history. His work directly influenced the likes of Jimi Hendrix, The Who, The Rolling Stones, The Yardbirds and countless others in the British blues revival of the early 1960’s.In honor of the late Mose Allison, listen to his original song “Young Man Blues” as well as The Who’s iconic rock n’ roll version of it.last_img read more

Nobel physics laureate Roy Glauber dies at 93

first_imgRoy J. Glauber ’46, the pioneering theoretical physicist who received the Nobel Prize in 2005 and was one of the last living scientists to have been present for the dawn of the atomic age, died on Dec. 26, 2018. He was 93.The research that set Glauber on the path to a Nobel began with his interest in a groundbreaking 1956 experiment that confirmed a key concept of quantum physics — that light was both a particle and a wave — and laid the groundwork for the field. His landmark 1963 paper, “The Quantum Theory of Optical Coherence,” used quantum mechanical tools to transform science’s understanding of light, which previously had only been studied using classical techniques.“We really did not have a complete understanding of the quantum properties of light, and what Roy’s work laid out was a framework for thinking about that,” said Mikhail Lukin, the George Vasmer Leverett Professor of Physics and co-director of the Quantum Science and Engineering Initiative. “It allowed us to think about these types of questions quantitatively … so I would argue that his work very much laid the groundwork for the field of quantum science and technology that people are talking about right now.”Lukin said the theories outlined by Glauber opened the door for many scientific discoveries as well as next-generation technologies, including quantum computers and networks and the use of quantum cryptography, which relies on quantum mechanics to create impossible-to-crack codes.“Those ideas all grow out of this framework that he developed,” Lukin said. “Some people refer to these new developments as the second quantum revolution — the first was about understanding the laws of quantum mechanics. But in this second revolution … the idea is that now that we understand the quantum world and we can actually control it, let’s see what we can use it for. Can we build materials with properties which you design on demand? Can we build quantum computers? Can we build quantum networks where we can send information with absolute security from one side of the country to the other? These types of ideas very much depend on understanding where the classical world ends and the quantum world starts, and that’s where these ideas Roy pioneered and developed become absolutely critical.”Glauber graduated from the Bronx High School of Science and entered Harvard as a 16-year-old freshman, but left as a sophomore when he was recruited to join the Manhattan Project, where he worked with future Nobel-winning physicist Richard Feynman to calculate the critical mass of the first atomic bomb. Glauber was later present at the first tests of the bomb.Following World War II, he returned to Harvard to finish his undergraduate studies and later earn a Ph.D. After receiving his doctorate he was recruited to a position at the Institute for Advanced Study by Robert Oppenheimer, and worked there before returning to Harvard in 1952, where he spent the remainder of his career.Though he was known for taking his scientific work seriously, friends said Glauber wasn’t without a lighter side. For years, he was “keeper of the broom,” clearing the stage of paper airplanes thrown during the annual Ig Nobel Prize ceremony recognizing unusual or trivial scientific achievements.One of the few years Glauber missed the Ig Nobel ceremony was in 2005 — because he was in Stockholm collecting his real Nobel.“I think he took real glee in his role at the Ig Noble ceremony,” said Arthur Jaffe, the Landon T. Clay Professor of Mathematics and Theoretical Science. “He loved to describe with a smile his role as the janitor, sweeping the stage at the end of the performance.”In his spare time, Jaffe said, Glauber had great interest in classical music. He and his partner, Atholie Rosett, occasionally hosted events for one local performing group in their home.“People consider him a father of … a huge area of physics that has been very prolific in modern life,” Jaffe said. “He always had a very clear opinion about his evaluation of other scientists. Personally he remained modest; his character did not change at all after the Nobel Prize.”Irwin Shapiro, the Timken University Professor, knew Glauber for more than six decades, first as a student and later as his colleague. He credits Glauber with ensuring that he got his first job after receiving his Ph.D.“He was only four years older than I, and he called the head of the MIT Lincoln Laboratory who was thinking of hiring me and suggested, with no uncertainty, that he do so,” Shapiro said.Though both had grown up in New York, they had never met before Shapiro became Glauber’s first doctoral student.“One anecdote that made him laugh when I told him was, when I first became his advisee in 1952, I told my mother about it and mentioned Roy’s name as my adviser,” Shapiro recalled. “She somehow mentioned it to her younger sister, who piped up and said, ‘Oh, Felicia’s little boy, Roy!’ I don’t know how my aunt knew Roy’s mother, but somehow they had been friends.”Glauber is survived by his son, Jeffrey, a daughter, Valerie Glauber Fleishman; a sister, Jacqueline Gordon; Rosett, his companion of 13 years; and five grandchildren.last_img read more

Insurance next big hurdle for Adani’s proposed Carmichael coal mine in Australia

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Global Mining Review:The Indian conglomerate Adani Group is trying to move forward with plans to build a massive coal mine in the Galilee Basin in Queensland (Australia). This project has been the object of years-long controversy in Australia and around the world. The toxicity of Adani’s proposed Carmichael coal mine – not just environmentally and socially, but reputationally as well – has made the project a base test of credibility for any global financial institution wanting to be taken seriously as a climate change risk manager.To date, over three dozen financial institutions have made commitments to not finance the project, and after spending nearly a decade in search of the funds, Adani finally announced in November 2018 that it had secured the billions of dollars necessary to build the mine. Who was the mysterious investor? Turns out it was the Adani Group itself. You can only imagine how desperate a company would need to be before committing to fund a project requiring billions of dollars off its own balance sheet after a years-long search for an investor.But the campaign over Adani’s Carmichael mine is far from over. Insurance is one area where Adani also needs financial support. In fact, insurance is a critical piece required to obtain government permits and start construction, and a growing campaign targeting insurers to accelerate the transition to a clean energy future has taken note.In December 2018, the Global Unfriend Coal campaign and allies – representing 73 organisations and a combined membership of more than 76 million people – sent a letter calling on 35 major global insurers to not insure the proposed Carmichael coal mine and associated infrastructure. Given the number of responses that were received within two weeks of sending the letter, the insurance industry is clearly feeling the pressure to avoid highly controversial coal projects.10 companies immediately responded to Unfriend Coal’s call to not insure the project, either explicitly stating their refusal to be involved or referencing existing coal restriction policies that applied in this case. These included the world’s biggest insurers and reinsurers, Allianz, AXA, Swiss Re and Munich Re; two of Australia’s largest infrastructure insurers, QBE and Suncorp; the first major US insurer to publicly rule out a coal project, FM Global; as well as major European insurers Generali, Zurich and SCOR. Since then, two additional companies have announced restrictions on coal underwriting that would rule out involvement with the mine: Mapfre and Uniqa.For the insurers that have not yet ruled out supporting Adani, the pressure is now building. Last month, lawyers at ClientEarth wrote to Lloyd’s warning them of the financial risks surrounding the project and warning: “Should you or your syndicates fail to take these factors into account as part of your risk management processes, this may constitute a breach of your legal duties.”More: Insurers shun Adani’s Carmichael mine, reflecting the industry’s retreat from coal Insurance next big hurdle for Adani’s proposed Carmichael coal mine in Australialast_img read more

Israel to add 15GW of solar capacity by 2030

first_imgIsrael to add 15GW of solar capacity by 2030 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Magazine:Israel’s cabinet has approved a plan submitted by energy minister Yuval Steinitz to deploy around 15 GW more solar capacity to help raise the 2030 target for the proportion of national electricity drawn from renewables from 17% to 30%.An intermediate target of 20% has been set for 2025, and by the end of 2024 the overall target may be updated.“This decision will radically change the energy mix of the Israeli economy and position the country as one of the leading Western countries in solar energy production, at the expense of power plants operating on natural gas and diesel,” the Ministry of Energy stated.The plan will be financed through a slight increase in power tariffs, which the government estimates between 2 and 3%. “The plan will in the future lead to a reduction in energy costs, while promoting a reliable, efficient and sustainable energy economy,” it further explained.Israel had around 1.19 GW of solar capacity at the end of last year, according to International Renewable Energy Agency figures. Developers deployed around 120 MW of solar in Israel last year.[Emiliano Bellini]More: Israeli government greenlights plan to add 15 GW of solar by 2030last_img read more

What is your credit union event strategy?

first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Matt Ward Matt is the founder of Breakthrough Champion…In 2002 Matt began working with business owners through his website agency, inConcert Web Solutions, to improve their bottom line, gain more clients, … Web: www.Breakthrough-Champion.com Details When you go to events and represent your credit union what is your strategy?  Specifically, I’m talking about local events like Chamber Business Expos and the like.I went to a tradeshow once and was walking down the center aisle. There were booths on both sides. Lots of chamber members were exhibiting, conversing, and networking.  They had well-decorated booths and many of them sat comfortably behind their respective tabled between the pipe and drape booths of the expo. But then there was Sam.Sam was a rather tall, slender man, who was very outgoing. I knew that because he was engaged in a conversation with someone out in front of his booth. He was animated and talking with his hands. His head was on a swivel, constantly looking over the shoulder of the person he was speaking with. He’d look left, and then right, always trying to be sure not to miss a single person walking down the aisle.See…Sam saw each person as an opportunity.  An opportunity to give his contact information to them in the form of a card. I’m sure Sam thought “Heck, I’ve paid good money for this expo booth, and I need to get some leads!” As I approached Sam’s booth, he broke conversation with the person he was speaking with and extended his hand with a huge smile, followed by a “Hello, I’m Sam, what’s your name?”  My initial thought was, wow, he’s pleasant, then the look from the other person was clear. She was rather miffed as to why Sam just stopped speaking with her to talk to me.As I progressed down the aisle, Sam wanted to be sure I didn’t pass his booth without getting his contact info, so when I shook his hand in passing, he offered me a business card. At this time I had already determined that Sam has a Website Agency. Sam was in the business of creating websites for companies.  When he offered his card, I politely put my hand up and said: “I’m all set, but thanks”.Sam responded with “You don’t want my card?” at which I replied with “Why would I want your card?”Sam then stated, in a rather pleading way…”Surely you know someone who needs a website!”This is when I stopped cold in my tracks, turned directly to Sam and pointed at the shirt I was wearing that clearly indicated I owned a website agency myself!  I then pointed directly at the logo and said: “why would I want your card, my company does websites”.What Sam missed here was a connection. His strategy was to focus on the numbers. At the time, I recall thinking that Sam appeared to be much more like a live human PEZ dispenser! If Sam had approached this situation differently, I think we could have found a way to partner together between our agencies. Instead, he chose this route, and his agency was out of business within 5 years, and I sold mine!Think about the numbers strategy and how that appears to the public, for your credit union. What’s the goal of the event? Is it to collect cards? Give out cards? Give out promo items? Or is it much more about finding one really good referral partner or potential customer? Keep in mind with the approach to find one, often comes a few more because the strategy of going for just one works really well and is viewed by others as being much more caring.Here’s to your success at your next credit union event!Feel free to bring along some PEZ Dispenser and see who knows what they are!last_img read more

Gold standard

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Pile of bodies linked to coronavirus found at US nursing home

first_imgThe cause of death of the 17 has not been confirmed but 68 people have recently died at the facility, and 26 of those tested positive for COVID-19, the Times reported.Police did not confirm the number of bodies found. But in a statement posted on the Andover police Facebook page, one of the home’s owners, Chaim Scheinbaum, said the morgue, which normally houses four bodies, “never had more than 15 present” on Monday.”The staff was clearly overwhelmed and probably short-staffed,” Andover Police Chief Eric Danielson told CNN. US police found 17 bodies piled up in a nursing home morgue in New Jersey, media reported Thursday, highlighting how the coronavirus outbreak is overwhelming long-term care facilities.Officers in the small locality of Andover, around 80 kilometers west of New York City, discovered the bodies following an anonymous tip-off, according to The New York Times.The discovery came on Monday at the Andover Subacute and Rehabilitation Unit — one of the largest care homes in New Jersey, a state badly hit by coronavirus. New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy said he was “outraged” that bodies had been allowed to pile up and ordered an investigation.COVID-19 has killed more than 32,000 people across the United States, according to Johns Hopkins University, with New Jersey the worst-hit state after New York.The outbreak has reportedly claimed thousands of lives in retirement homes, spotlighting how vulnerable the elderly are to the illness.center_img Topics :last_img read more